Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features ancient mountain resting in Yosemite National Park, California. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo Mountain

"A man must be big enough to admit his mistakes, smart enough to profit from them, and strong enough to correct them."

John C. Maxwell

Keeping Seniors Heart-Healthy

Senior caregivers list heart disease as one of the major concerns for their senior clients and loved ones. Heart disease is the leading cause of death among the elderly, and it affects both men and women. Looking at the statistics, it’s easy to see why many of us know someone in our lives that has been affected by heart disease.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), every year about 715,000 Americans have a heart attack, and about 600,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year–that’s 1 in every 4 deaths.

February is, not surprisingly, American Heart Health Month. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes heart disease, strokes and high blood pressure. Although some factors can put you at higher risk, such as race and ethnicity, family medical history, and even geographical area, many CVD deaths could be prevented with lifestyle changes such as eating a healthier diet, exercising, and not smoking. Medication may also be necessary to manage conditions like high blood pressure and diabetes.

Healthy habits and a healthy lifestyle can go a long way toward preventing heart disease. Here are some tips from the CDC:

Get a check-up once a year, even if you feel healthy. You know the adage: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Have your blood pressure and cholesterol numbers checked regularly. If you have diabetes, talk to your health-care team about how to best manage it. If you need medication, remember to take it.

Eat a healthy diet. Eat lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. Limit your fats and sodium. Whole foods are better than processed. Good nutrition is key.

Exercise regularly. Incorporate exercise into your everyday life. Shoot for 30 minutes of exercise every day.

Don't smoke. If you don't smoke, don't start. If you do smoke, quit as soon as possible.

Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight or obese can increase your risk for CVD. Know your body mass index (BMI) and maintain the optimal weight for your height.

Limit alcohol use. Alcohol can increase your blood pressure. Men should stick to no more than two drinks per day, and women to no more than one.

Seniors living even the healthiest of lifestyles can still fall victim to cardiovascular disease. The elderly and their caregivers should be aware of the following warning signs that necessitate immediate intervention (courtesy of the American Heart Association):

HEART ATTACK WARNING SIGNS

  • Chest discomfort
  • Discomfort in other parts of the upper body
  • Shortness of breath
  • Cold sweat, nausea, lightheadedness

STROKE WARNING SIGNS Spot a stroke F.A.S.T.:

  • Face Drooping: Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile.
  • Arm Weakness: Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?
  • Speech Difficulty: Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, like "the sky is blue." Is the sentence repeated correctly?
  • Time to call 9-1-1: If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get them to the hospital immediately.

CARDIAC ARREST WARNING SIGNS

  • Sudden loss of responsiveness: no response to tapping on shoulders.
  • No normal breathing

If you think you or someone you know is experiencing any of the symptoms above, call 9-1-1 or your emergency response number immediately. Heart attack and stroke are life-and-death emergencies — every second counts. Senior caregivers can receive additional Caregiverlist Basic Training, powered by Caregiver Training University. The 8-hour training course meets senior caregiver orientation training requirements for many states and provides information on how to best care for your senior client or loved one.

Orlando, Florida Certified Nursing Assistant Wins Refer-a-Friend Weekly Prize

Congratulations to the February weekly winner of Caregiverlist Refer-a-Friend and Win program - caregiver Melissa Diaz from Orlando, FL.

Melissa, certified nursing aide, referred her friends and family for caregiving jobs that are available on Caregiverlist.com, and she won basic senior caregiver training and certification from Caregiverlist. Read Melissa's and other caregivers' stories on Refer-a-Friend page, and refer your caregiving friends and family for senior care employment.

 

Senior care companies hire Professional Caregivers, C.N.A.’s, & C.H.H.A.’s weekly from Caregiverlist, the only Caregiver Career Center customized for the senior care industry.  Apply for multiple caregiving positions near you online by visiting Caregiverlist Caregiver Career Center.

 

As more senior caregivers are needed, refer friends to caregiving jobs at the Caregiverlist Career center and anyone considering a career in senior care can also visit the C.N.A. and C.H.H.A. school directories, C.N.A. sample and practice tests, and other up to date information for senior caregivers.

Refer-a-friend to Caregiverlist and get entered to win a free 8-hour online caregiver training program certification for senior caregivers. A new winner is drawn weekly. One monthly GRAND PRIZE WINNER receives a Scrub of the Month (top, bottoms and pair of shoes), courtesy of Scrubs Magazine.

El Paso, Texas Caregiver Wins Refer-a-Friend Weekly Prize for Referring Her Family and Friends to Caregiverlist Job Application

Congratulations to the January weekly winner of Caregiverlist Refer-a-Friend and Win program - caregiver Breyanna from El Paso, TX.

 

Breyanna referred her friends and family for caregiving jobs that are available on Caregiverlist.com, and she won basic senior caregiver training and certification from Caregiverlist. Read Breyanna's caregiver story on Refer-a-Friend page, and refer your caregiving friends and family.

 

Senior care companies hire Professional Caregivers, C.N.A.’s, & C.H.H.A.’s weekly from Caregiverlist, the only Caregiver Career Center customized for the senior care industry.  Apply for multiple caregiving positions near you online by visiting Caregiverlist Caregiver Career Center. Caregiver Career Center has caregiver and certified nursing assistant employment tools such as free resume writer, caregiving jobs, C.N.A. and C.H.H.A. school directories, C.N.A. sample and practice tests, and other up to date information for senior caregivers.

 

Refer-a-friend to Caregiverlist and get entered to win a free 10-hour online caregiver training program certification for senior caregivers. A new winner is drawn weekly. One monthly GRAND PRIZE WINNER receives a Scrub of the Month (top, bottoms and pair of shoes), courtesy of Scrubs Magazine.

Caregiverlist Refer-a-Friend and Win

Gilmer, Texas Caregiver Wins Refer-a-Friend Weekly Prize for Referring Her Family and Friends to Caregiverlist Job Application

Congratulations to the January weekly winner of Caregiverlist Refer-a-Friend and Win program - caregiver Mary Abrahamson from Gilmer, TX.

 

Mary referred her friends and family for caregiving jobs that are available on Caregiverlist.com, and she won basic senior caregiver training and certification from Caregiverlist. Senior caregivers may work for a senior home care agency, assisted living community, hospice or nursing home. Training requirements and caregiver pay vary based on the employer and the job position. Pay will be more than minimum wage in each state.

 

Senior care companies hire Professional Caregivers, C.N.A.’s, & C.H.H.A.’s weekly from Caregiverlist, the only Caregiver Career Center customized for the senior care industry.  Apply for multiple caregiving positions near you online.

 

Refer-a-friend to Caregiverlist and get entered to win a free 10-hour online caregiver training program certification for senior caregivers. A new winner is drawn weekly. One monthly GRAND PRIZE WINNER receives a Scrub of the Month (top, bottoms and pair of shoes), courtesy of Scrubs Magazine.

Scrub of the Month Monthly Prize

Senior Care Considerations During Polar Vortex

Since most of the United States is locked in the grip of a fierce “polar vortex”, or sub-zero temperatures, I thought it might be a good time to revisit special considerations of elderly care during this time of extreme weather. Here in Chicago, yesterday’s low temperature was -16F, with a windchill of -50F. Elsewhere in the Midwest and Plain states, all-time low temperature records were broken. Exposure to the elements could result in frostbite or hypothermia in just a few minutes.

The elderly are vulnerable during extreme weather, especially those with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia who are prone to wandering. In New York state, an elderly woman suffering from Alzheimer’s disease left her home and was found dead in the snow, not more than 100 yards from her door. So as the frigid temperatures make their way east and south, all the way down to Florida, be on guard for the special needs associated with the aged.

Older adults lose body heat more quickly than the young, and hypothermia can set in fast. According to Stay Safe in Cold Weather, by the National Institute on Aging, “for an older person, a body temperature colder than 95 degrees can cause many health problems such as a heart attack, kidney problems, liver damage, or worse.”

Certain medications can make it easier for the elderly to get hypothermia, so check with a physician if that’s a concern.

Keep the house warm by restricting open rooms. Shut their vents and doors to maximize heat in the living and sleeping areas. Close blinds and curtains to help eliminate drafts.

Food is fuel, so make sure the senior eats enough. Also, cold air is drier, so make sure they keep hydrated. Caregiver training recommends a senior drink 64oz. of liquid (preferably water) daily.

If space heaters are used for supplemental heat, be sure they are turned off before bed and when unattended and make sure a smoke alarm and carbon monoxide detector are nearby, as these are common concerns.

If your senior family member or client shows the following signs, call 911 immediately, as these are signs of advanced hypothermia:

  • moving slowly, trouble walking, or being clumsy
  • stiff and jerky arm or leg movements
  • slow heartbeat
  • slow, shallow breathing
  • blacking out or losing consciousness

As always, if you or a senior in your care needs special help, contact your state's Area Agency on Aging. Until this arctic weather passes (and it shall, just not soon enough!), Caregiverlist wishes all seniors and their caregivers to stay warm and safe.

 

Fort Knox, Kentucky and Jacksonville, North Carolina Caregivers Win Refer-a-Friend Prize for Referring Their friends to Caregiverlist Job Application

Congratulations to the winners of Caregiverlist Refer-a-Friend for Caregiving Job and Win program - senior caregiver Rebecca Bise from Fort Knox, Kentucky, and caregiver Tiffany Clervil from Jacksonville, North Carolina!

 

Rebecca and Tiffany referred their friends, family and caregiving coworkers for caregiving jobs that are available on Caregiverlist.com, and they won free senior caregiver 10 hour training course, lapel pin, and Caregiverlist t-shirt.

 

Caregiving provides fulfillment beyond a paycheck and offers the benefits of flexible work schedules as part-time and full-time caregivers are always needed.

 

Refer-a-friend to Caregiverlist and get entered to win a free t-shirt, lapel pin and 10-hour online caregiver training program as a member of the Professional Association of Caregivers. A new winner is drawn weekly. One monthly GRAND PRIZE WINNER receives a free and fashionable Scrub of the Month (top, bottoms and pair of shoes), courtesy of Scrubs Magazine.

Senior Caregiver Training

Taking the Certified Nursing Aide Exam: A Story

Senior care is more than just a job, it’s a calling. It’s what we at Caregiverlist truly believe and the staff at Caregiverlist proves the point. Many come from eldercare backgrounds and feel very strongly about our mission, “Caring for the Caregiver” because we’ve lived it.

Caregiverlist account manager Patrick Welch began his career as a C.N.A. at age 16. In a previous post, Patrick shared his story about becoming a C.N.A. and working as a C.N.A. during his clinical trials training. Here he talks specifically about taking his C.N.A. exam.

After my interesting and memorable experience taking the 120 hour Wisconsin C.N.A. class and having my first resident pass away during my 32 hours of clinical training in a rather abrupt and unconventional manner, it was time for me to take the official C.N.A. exam. There are a few different companies who administer the Nurse Aide exam. I took the sample exam through Headmaster as a refresher and passed with a 93%. The official Wisconsin exam I needed to pass was through Pearson Vue, includes a written and evaluation portion of the exam. The two-part exam takes approximately 3 hours and is comprised of approximately 60 multiple choice and 10 reading comprehension questions, in addition to 5 randomly selected skills to be performed during the evaluation portion.

After my class, I registered to take the official Wisconsin Nurse Aide exam and paid my $115 exam fee. In a letter I received shortly after, I was notified I would be taking my exam in Wausau, Wisconsin at a semi-monthly testing facility, which happened to be located on the same technical college campus where I took my nurse aide class.

I came in early to sign-in, and was asked to provide a valid ID. This is important — make sure you have a valid form of identification or they will not let you take the exam. As all the students trickled into the waiting room, we waited to be called into the classroom to start their exams.

I finished the written portion of my exam with plenty of time to spare, flipped it over and waited to be called for my turn to complete the evaluation portion. I felt that the written portion was a breeze, but I was slightly anxious about the evaluation portion. What if I had to perform female peri-care in front of an instructor, would I get it right? As a male C.N.A., you always have a little push back and this was certainly on my mind. However, growing up around a mother who was a nurse and having an excellent instructor throughout my 120 hour C.N.A. course, I figured that no matter what they throw at me I could handle it.

When they finally called my name, I walked into the next room where the skills evaluation takes place and was given five random tasks. “You need to demonstrate proper hand washing techniques, female peri-care, feeding a diabetic patient, dental care, and recording vital signs” stated my instructor. I knew that I could handle all of these tasks, the only one I was slightly anxious on was female peri-care, but my instructor had taught me a way to remember how to properly handle this skill, with a simple rhyme; majora majora, minora minora, down the middle, obviously this is very basic on how to handle this task, but it provided me with a guide to properly perform this skill.

Proper handwashing techniques are vital to remember before performing any task, and depending on the skill may require you to wash your hands more than once. Make sure that you always listen to exactly what your instructor tells you and remember to perform the task exactly as you learned it. I left the testing facility feeling pretty good about myself — all that was left was to wait for the results to be mailed to me, which can take up to 2 weeks. When the letter finally came, I was relieved to see that I had successfully passed my nurse aide exam and was an official Wisconsin Certified Nursing Aide.

Are you compassionate? A team player with a positive attitude, well sounds like you’re ready to become a C.N.A.. Look up a C.N.A. school in your area and get enrolled today. Listen to Patrick discuss becoming a C.N.A. in Part One of this BlogTalkRadio series: Becoming a Certified Nursing Aide.

Current Caregiving Podcasts at Blog Talk Radio with Caregiverlist on BlogTalkRadio

Tampa, Florida Caregiver Wins Refer-a-Friend Prize for Referring Her Friends to Caregivelist Job Application

Congratulations to this week's winner of Caregiverlist Refer-a-Friend for Caregiving Job and Win program - senior caregiver Katrina Myrick from Tampa, FL!

 

Katrina referred her friends and family for caregiving jobs that are available on Caregiverlist.com, and she won free senior caregiver 10 hour training course, lapel pin, and Caregiverlist t-shirt.

 

Caregiving provides fulfillment beyond a paycheck and offers the benefits of flexible work schedules as part-time and full-time caregivers are always needed.

 

Refer-a-friend to Caregiverlist and get entered to win a free t-shirt, lapel pin and 10-hour online caregiver training program as a member of the Professional Association of Caregivers. A new winner is drawn weekly. One monthly GRAND PRIZE WINNER receives a Scrub of the Month (top, bottoms and pair of shoes), courtesy of Scrubs Magazine.

Caregiverlist Refer-a-Friend Job Application Winner

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features one of a kind sunset with clouds,  for caregivers and nurse aides to relax. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo Sunset

"The only source of knowledge is experience." 

Albert Einstein

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