Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Senior Caregiver Jobs with Part-Time, Full-Time, and Live-in Job Openings

Caregiverlist's Samantha Franklin explains that Professional Senior Caregivers in Philadelphia, PA, are always in demand. Philadelphia senior caregiving jobs are available for full-time, part-time, and live-in caregiving and certified nursing aide positions, as senior care companies hire from 3 to 6 new caregivers each week. Apply for Caregiver, Certified Nursing Assistant, Certified Home Health Aide, and Companion job openings near you on www.caregiverlist.com. Do you know someone who is looking for caregiver employment? Refer-a-Friend for caregiving jobs and enter for a chance to win Scrub of the Month , courtesy of Scrubs Magazine. 

 

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How Do I Apply for a Senior Care Job? and Other Caregiver Job Questions

At Caregiverlist, we monitor the questions we get from our community of caregivers. One of the most frequently asked questions has to do with the application and hiring process for home caregivers through our site. Here’s our caregiver job FAQ:

I am interested in a job as a caregiver. Do you hire me directly?
No, we don’t hire caregivers directly. We work with quality home care agencies in your area who will have access to your application, resume and certification information. If you fit their needed caregiver criteria, they will contact you directly. They hire for part-time, full-time and live-in caregivers.

I’m unclear about how to apply for a senior care job on Caregiverlist. Can you walk me through the process?
Yes! Our application takes about 5 minutes to fill out and, once submitted, gets pushed out to all the home care agencies in your area with whom we work — one application, lots of potential employers! Watch the video below and see just how simple the application process is:

How can I stand out in a sea of applicants?
Good question! It’s true that senior caregivers are in great demand and the need for great caregivers growing. However, the best caregivers get the best jobs and we’ve made it our mission to help you in the process.

If you are new to the caregiver field, we recommend you start with our basic, online non-medical caregiver training. It satisfies many states’ minimum 10-hour training requirements. Some states require more, so be sure to check out your state’s requirements. Once you’ve passed training, you can indicate your certification on your application.

Next, we suggest you fill out a resume and attach it to your application. We’ve found that it really helps your application stand out.

Third, while it’s not absolutely necessary, you can purchase a background check to see what other employers will be seeing and what it says about you. There’s no getting it — anyone who works in the caregiving field will be subject to a thorough background check. Home care agencies agree that background checks are a vital part of the hiring process and if you walk in with your own, verifiable background check, it really shows your initiative.

Once you are on your way in the caregiving field, you may decide to go further and become a Certified Nursing Aide. We provide a free Sample Certified Nursing Aide Test to see if you have what it takes to become a C.N.A. If it’s something you are interested in pursuing, we can provide you with C.N.A. and C.H.H.A school directories. Caregiving is a challenging and fulfilling job. We at Caregiverlist are dedicated to help you get started on this important career path and make a difference in a senior’s life.

Caregiver Training and Certification

Caregiverlist's Samantha Franklin explains how  to become a Professional Senior Caregiver with 10-hour training course and certification from Caregiverlist.  Caregiverlist provides online training for professional senior caregivers. Once you complete the caregiver training, then apply for Caregiver, Certified Nursing Assistant, Certified Home Health Aide, and Companion job openings near you on www.caregiverlist.com.

 

 

 

Certified Nursing Aide Salary Advice — by C.N.A.s

Senior caregivers, especially C.N.A.s, have a lot of love for their profession. They have to — the hours are long, the work is tough, and the money...well, we all agree that there are better-paying jobs out there. And while there are few professions that affect so many lives in so many ways, let’s face it, a gal (or guy) has got to eat.

While scouting C.N.A. salaries across the country, our friends at Scrubs Magazine found that the highest paid spots tend to be big cities like NYC, Los Angeles and DC, while smaller cities (especially in the South) offer lower hourly rates. So they posed this question: As a C.N.A., how do you feel about the pay where you live? Do you think the pay would be better if you moved to a different region? What tips do you have for a C.N.A. looking to make some extra money?

C.N.A.s across the country chimed in and have this to say about pay:

Portland, ME:
“I worked at a nursing home right outside Portland, Maine for a few years while living up there and I made $17.50. That was weekend pay but I also was per diem so that bumped me up a few bucks and I was ALWAYS looking for extra shifts that were posted because they were either double time, +$10 or +$6 an hour. C.N.A.s have to be crafty! Always keep your eyes out for how to make THE MOST money because we work very hard and do hard work! Companies will always try to screw you so you have to be on top it!”
-SassyCathy

Burlington, VT:
“I kept on applying for jobs in hospitals and was offered one six months later in Vermont. I worked as a C.N.A./PCT for two years in LTC and at a large hospital in Boston. I have a BSN and a BS in biology. The job market in Mass. is horrible, for both new grads and experienced nurses. Vermont, on the other hand, has a great need for nurses. It’s still competitive to get a job as a new grad, but once your foot is in the door you can move about to any specialty you desire.” -Yllomia

Boston, MA:
“I made around $14/hr as a tech at Tufts. However, working there (or any hospital) in nursing school is no guarantee of a position there as an RN. I graduated last year, and they were unable to give me (or any other graduating techs) anything. Having a C.N.A. position is a leg up, but is by no means a guaranteed in, so please consider that before signing yourself up for a long commute and expensive parking.” -NurseKatie08

New York City, NY:
“Here in Long Island, NY you can make up to $18.75 an hour. That’s what my friend is making at a nursing home. Definitely don’t rule them out.” -*Miss*

Albany, NY:
“In NY, it’s $14-$17 to start. Plus shift differential. Usually 3-11 p.m. is $1.50 extra, and 11-7 a.m. is $2.00 extra. Of course, this is evened out by the cost of living being so high here, but if you have the same benefits in a cheaper living situation, this could make all the difference!”
  -Paws2people

“I’m in NY and started at $15, I’m at almost $16 now. Evenings are 10% diff and overnights are 15% diff. Every little bit!” -peppercat21

“I live in upstate NY. I commute 45 minutes away to a large hospital in Sayre, PA. I was offered 3 positions immediately after graduation. I work on a step-down cardiac floor (yes, it is a specialty). I have 2 bachelor’s, one is a BSN another in psychology. We do hire new grads, they hire I’d say at least 20-30 a year, hospital wide. I’ve almost completed my first year. It has been a whirlwind; school does not teach you half of what the “real world” is going to teach you, it is so completely different! I plan on becoming a Nurse Practitioner.” 
-cardiacrocks

Newark, NJ:
“Mountainside Hospital School of Nursing requires nursing assistant skills before you begin their program. They give the course for the month of July before the program begins in August. You can work across the street at the hospital while you continue on to get your RN. The cost of the nursing assistant course is only $500. It is in Montclair/Glen Ridge. It is not a certification course, but you will still be able to work for the same pay as a C.N.A. The hospital starts you off with almost $13 for the first 3 months, and then you get your eval.” -Hydakins

Philadelphia, PA:
“I live in Southeastern PA. When I first started back in 2004-2005, I was paid $9.72 an hour. The pay was a bit low, but they offered a full benefit package as well as paid vacation/sick time. My last position at an LTC in 2008 I was as a pool/floater and was paid $13 an hour during the week and $14 an hour for weekends. No medical benefits or I would have had to take a $3 pay cut! Pay attention to those sorts of details and decide what’s best for you.”  -asun21ta

Baltimore, MD:
“I am a tech at GBMC. I’m also a junior year nursing student. When I started working there almost 4 years ago the starting pay for techs/nursing students was $10.50 an hour. Now I believe it’s between $11.50 – $12 an hour. I just want to let you know that without patient care experience you can’t expect to start off making a lot of money. When I finished the C.N.A./G.N.A. course I was working in a nursing home making $8 an hour.” -jenawade25

Wilmington, DE:
“Christiana Care is a great place to work. There are endless options as to what you may want to do there. I worked at Wilmington Hospital for 7 years and left for 3 to work for private practice. I went back to Wilmington because I missed the bedside. I’m now a PCC at Christiana. They do own everything and they are lacking in the HR dept. I’ve seen a few horror stories from people who have gotten injured. However, there is some pride in working for the biggest healthcare organization in Delaware. Even the change from Wilmington to Christiana has been huge. I used to say “Wilmington Hospital” and people would say, “Where, St. Francis?” No one had any clue that Wilmington was part of Christiana. I swore I’d never go to Christiana, but I took the chance and I’m there now and I am pretty happy. Things could always be better. One hospital versus another? They all have their good and bad sides.”  -GreenEyedNurse

Washington, D.C.:
“Children’s in DC, Washing Hospital Center, GW all hire CNAs. At Children’s they are called PCTs, Patient Care Technicians. If you are a nursing student and have already had your first clinical there are other types of opportunities in the role of the CNA, one-on-one with a nurse, but still a C.N.A.” -RNNPICU

Providence, RI:
“I JUST got hired at hospital for my first C.N.A. job on a med/surg floor. With no experience, it’s $12.49/hr. It’s 3rd shift though, so I get a $2.50 differential and on weekends I get an extra $1.50. With experience it’s more like $14 and change an hour, plus any differentials. Low, yes, but higher than most nursing homes. I’ve interviewed at places that were barely $10/hr!” -kelsey.kristine

“I work at a hospital in RI and with no experience, I make $12.49 an hour, plus differential. 3rd shift(what I was hired for) is an extra $2.50/hour, weekends are $1.75 and I believe evenings are $1.50. If I work my regularly scheduled hours any 3rd shift I pick up is time 1/2 which is very, very nice! Most nursing homes I interviewed at were under $10/hour. I made more working at a coffee shop!” -kelsey.kristine

When you apply for a C.N.A. or C.H.H.A job through Caregiverlist, your caregiver resume is seen by the top quality Home Care Agencies. It only takes 5 minutes to fill out our application. Senior care companies nationwide hire new Part-time, Full-time and Live-in staff weekly from Caregiverlist.

Caregiver Winners of the Summer Photo Contest Announced

Certified Nursing Aides, CHHAs, professional and family caregivers entered Caregiverlist’s first-ever Summer Photo Contest for Senior Caregivers. We counted the votes were and the winners were announced this morning. The top 3 voted photos submitted of caregivers with the seniors in their care win Amazon gift cards. Runner-ups receive free t-shirts. The contest was conducted on Facebook and ran from Monday, July 8, 2013 until voting closed on August 31, 2013. You can see the results of the voting here.

First prize of a $100 Amazon gift card is awarded to Christi M., whose submission “Clary and I” received 877 votes.

Here's a little bit about her:

I am a 29 year old caregiver in more ways than one. I am a daughter, a wife, a Mom, a Granddaughter, a transporter and a friend of the elderly. During the day my job is to transport the elderly. I am responsible for 6 people at a time. I am responsible for keeping them safe and making sure they arrive to their destination without any trouble. I make sure they trust and know me so they feel safe in my care. I have to admit some days are harder than others since you never know if the patient had their medication or if they are just not in the mood. I always put their needs first and approach everything with a smile. A smile is the best cure and is highly contagious. I transport a gentleman who loves to sing. It is the same song "Take me out to the ballgame" over and over, but it seems to make everyone's day. When I see him sad, I start to sing and he perks right up and starts signing. I believe it reminds him of his childhood.

My day does not end there. I also care for my husband and two children, which is a 24/7 365 days a year job. There is no sick days or vacation days. There is no paychecks or breaks, but I wouldn't give it up for all the money in the world. I also helped take care of my Grandmother, which consisted of changing sheets, cleaning bed pans, sponge baths, dressing, giving medicine, feeding, transporting, long sleepless nights, all while still working. She passed away and if I had it all to do over, I wouldn't change a thing. I would empty a thousand bed pans as long as I knew it was helping someone. To me, being a caregiver is about passion, love, caring, and being selfless. Above all the needs of everyone I care for comes before my own. I remember everyone I have ever cared for and each and everyone of them have touched my heart in one way or another. They have helped mold me into the wonderful caregiver I am today. Caregiving can be both rewarding and challenging at the same time but I wouldn't change it for anything.

Edward Hatfield was a close second with 848 votes for his photo submission, “Our Wedding Day.” Edward will receive a $50 Amazon gift certificate.

Caitlin Villasenor, is the third prize winner of a $25 Amazon gift card. Her untitled photo shows multi-generational caregiving and received 420 votes.

We'll be featuring each of them in upcoming posts.

Senior caregivers provide emotional support and socialization for seniors, enabling many families to continue to support grandparents and parents with quality care in their home. Adult children often do not live in the same city as their aging parents which means caregiving often becomes much more than a job for senior caregivers.

Caregivers perform the essential job functions for their senior clients—from seniors who need 24-hour care to those in nursing facilities. Working as a professional caregiver provides employee benefits along with a fulfilling career. Caregiver Training is crucial to providing professional care. Caregiverlist offers a 10-hour online orientation training course that meets most states' requirements and was created by members of the senior care industry's national association. 

Caregiverlist continues to show the love to caregivers with our Refer-a-Friend program. If you know someone who would make a great caregiver, refer them to Caregiverlist and be entered to win a free t-shirt or $50 gift card.

Caregiverlist congratulates all those who submitted photos of themselves with the seniors in their care.

Should Caregivers Wear Scrubs?

Caregiver scrubs as uniforms are clear indications of professionals on the job. Your elderly client can more easily identify you as a caregiver if you present yourself in a caregiver uniform. We think scrubs are ideal for the senior caregiver because they are comfortable, allow for a range of motion and are easily cleaned. And scrubs are a universal symbol identifying the wearer as a member of the healthcare profession.

CNAs and healthcare professionals are in the business of providing care. A set of stylish scrubs can also provide comfort for your senior client by distracting them from any unpleasantness by giving them something else to focus on.

Caregiverlist has partnered with Scrubs Magazine, the nurse’s guide to good living, to offer a Scrub of the Month as a Grand Prize in our Refer-A-Friend program. If you know someone who has what it takes to be a great caregiver (you know the type — good work ethic, reliable, and above all, empathetic), fill out the form and we'll be happy to set them on a career path that offers the ability to make a huge difference in someone's life.

This month’s scrubs are from Cherokee Uniforms. As you can see, they are smart, chic, comfortable, professional and FUN! They are easy to clean and they let the world know that you are skilled and ready to work. You could win the whole outfit — top, bottoms and shoes, when you refer a friend to Caregiverlist.

What do you think? Do you wear scrubs in your daily work as a senior caregiver? If you don’t, what is stopping you?

Nursing Home Dental Care May Be Lacking Report Shows

Nursing homes care for senior residents who have a wide variety of care needs.  However, the level of staffing of Certified Nursing Aides to the number of senior residents they are caring for directly impacts the quality of care. You can review the C.N.A. to resident staffing levels in Caregiverlist's easy-to-use Nursing Home Star-Ratings directory.

Dental care for nursing home residents can impact their overall health.  This sort of makes sense, because everything needs more attention as we age and our new cells stop regenerating quickly to replace the old cells. And now we have a little research to back this up.

This means a new question to ask nursing homes when you are considering moving a senior into one for rehabilitation, should be:  "how often do you assist residents to brush their teeth?  And, "what do you do if they are resistance to dental care?"

A survey by the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors says seven states have evaluated nursing home residents since 2011.  The findings show that there may be a growing epidemic in cavities, cracked teeth and gum disease in nursing home residents due to a lack of oral hygiene.

The association report gives the example of Kansas state, where nearly 30% of 540 older residents in 20 long-term-care facilities (that means nursing homes), had substantial oral debris on at least 2/3rds of their teeth and that regular oral care had become scarce.  

In Wisconsin, the report shows that about 31% of 1,100 nursing home residents from 24 different homes had teeth broken to the gums with visible roots, while about 35% had substantial oral debris.

Nursing home care includes dental care and the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 requires brushing the teeth of nursing home residents who cannot do it themselves.  However, this is easier said than done.  As Certified Nursing Aides, or C.N.A.'s, know, if a senior is resistant to assistance, it can be very difficult to brush their teeth for them.  C.N.A.'s are required by law to be staffed at nursing homes to assist with the daily hands-on care.  

Seniors who have neglected their dental care for years prior to be admitted to a nursing home present an additional challenge.  Medicare does not pay for routine dental care.  Perhaps new technology can assist with finding a better way to assist C.N.A.'s to perform dental care in nursing homes.  The family members of seniors should be aware that they may have to step in to assist if the senior does not want to cooperate with the brushing of teeth and oral hygiene.

As assisting senior can be a challenging job, although always fulfilling, there is an ongoing demand for more Certified Nursing Aides - apply for a companion caregiving job in your area (Part-time and Full-time positions are available) and learn about becoming a C.N.A.

 

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features purple violets that are bright and blooming. Thank you for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the week Violets

"There are no menial jobs, only menial attitudes."

William J. Bennett

Dementia (Memory Loss) May Show Early Signs

Memory loss actually may be first noticed by the person with the condition - meaning the person who is losing their memory realizes they are forgetting things and that something has changed even before anyone else does.  But as this is a confusing process, most people find it difficult to identify exactly what is happening.  This is why it usually is not until memory loss has escalated that it truly is identified.  Many seniors have needed senior caregivers for ten or more years as their memory loss has progressed.

The Alzheimer's Association conference in Boston this week presented studies which show that some types of cognitive concerns were more likely to have Alzheimer's pathology in the brain although dementia would only fully develop later.  People with more concerns about memory and organizing ability were more likely to have amyloid, a key Alzheimer's-related protein, in their brains.

As millions of dollars are poured into Alzheimer's research, in order to prepare for caring for what will become 5 million seniors with the disease, it still is not known exactly how the amyloid protein escalates in some individuals and causes the "tangles" that seem to be present when Alzheimer's disease is present.

Dr. Rebecca Amariglio, a neuropsychologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, presented the research which shows there are people who have their own sense that their memory and thinking skills are slipping.  This is being called the "subjective cognitive decline".

Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's center presented a similar preliminary study result.  However, the problem remains that even early testing for amyloid in the brain does not necessarily help as we still do not know exactly who will have this condition escalate into Alzheimer's disease and why.

Perhaps as technology advances, all the research along with the caregiving for seniors with memory loss can collide to help move us closer to identifying a cure for this disease.  The federal government's National Alzheimer's Project is a step in this direction.

 

 

Senior Caregiver Training

Senior caregivers assist seniors to remain independent in their own homes and sometimes also assist seniors living in assisted living communities and nursing homes.  This is because often nursing homes staff 1 Certified Nursing Aide to care for as many as 10 to 15 residents. Because of this, most seniors prefer to have one-to-one caregiving services in their own home while needing rehabilitation care or on-going senior care services.

Senior care services cannot always be administered quickly - senior caregiving, as experienced caregivers know, requires all the extra attention to detail you receive when enjoying a meal at a fine dining restaurant.  It cannot be done in fast-food style. Senior care also requires a wide variety of skills in order to understand how to cope with the aging process and promote dignity while providing caregiving services.

Caregiver training enables senior caregivers to provide quality care to seniors while maintaining a safe environment for themselves and for the senior.  By following consistent systems for the care routine, each caregiver can know what to expect and also quickly document when a care condition changes.

Certified Caregiver training verifies a caregiver has been taught the basic caregiver training skills.

Understanding how to take proper Care Plan notes, how to make objective observations and how to safely assist with bathing, meals, maintaining a clean and safe environment and making sure germs and infections are not spread.  Even tasks such as hand-washing, which is the #1 way to stop infections, must be done correctly.  

Caregivers can learn the basic senior caregiver training skills (which includes how to safely wash your hands - did you know properly drying your hands is very important, for instance?), and be confident they will deliver quality care with an online training course meeting industry standards.

Begin a career in senior care by purchasing an online certified training course and apply for a part-time or full-time caregiving job position to receive additional job training by a professional senior care company. Review the caregiver training requirements in your state as many states now do require basic training for professional senior caregivers and purchase the industry's approved certified caregiver training.

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