Minnesota Leads the Way in Senior Care

Minnesota’s comprehensive senior care programs may well become the nation’s standard. In addition to scoring a first-place position in AARP’s 2014 State Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) Scorecard (also in 2011), Minnesota’s Department of Human Services announced in a July 1 press release a plan to award $3.5 million to providers of services to older Minnesotans, as well as for people with disabilities. The money is specifically earmarked for innovative projects designed to improve quality for home and community-based services.

The program comes on the heels of the state’s successful 2006 Performance-based Incentive Payment Program (PIPP) that provides nursing homes with additional funds for proven quality improvement projects. In 2013, an article published in the journal Health Affairs determined that PIPP facilities showed significantly increased quality after PIPP funding and continued to have higher overall quality scores than nursing homes not in the program.

In fact, Good Samaritan Society - Albert Lea (Private), which rates over 4 stars in Caregiverlist's® Nursing Home Star Ratings, used its PIPP money to implement a nursing assistant mentorship program to increase its C.N.A. retention rate with great success.
 
The Minnesota Department of Health and Human Services is hoping to see a similar outcome by funding 27 projects in 39 Minnesota counties. Recipients must put policies in place to improve quality of life or deliver better service more efficiently.

For example, Knute Nelson Home Care will receive funding to implement GrandCare technology, an interactive touchscreen used as a communication portal between the older person and family caregivers. The Lutheran Home Association will use funds to decrease staff turnover in its in-home services, and the grant will help Tealwood Senior Living to develop and apply dementia care culture change in its assisted living facilities.

“Home and community-based service providers are key to helping people with disabilities and olderadults live independently, which is what most people prefer,” Human Services Commissioner Lucinda Jesson said in a written statement. “We have found that initiatives like this promote greater, lasting quality and efficiency and a better overall experience for people being served.”

Caregiverlist salutes Minnesota for taking a proactive approach to improving the quality of care for its elderly citizens. Minnesota’s initiatives are proving to set the bar for the best senior care in the U.S.  Now if they could just do something about those winters!

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