Virginia Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

“Virginia is for lovers”, so say the ads, and it’s a beautiful state -- from the Appalachian Mountains to Chesapeake Bay. Virginia has a rich history, of course, and Jamestown, founded in 1607, was the first permanent English settlement in North America. It’s the birthplace of many U.S. founding fathers and home to Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello. Colonial Williamsburg is still the vacation place of choice if you want to see what life was like during the Revolution.

It is estimated that by 2030, Virginians ages 65 and older will grow to about 1.8 million. Many of those seniors and their families will begin to look ahead to needed nursing home care for themselves or for their loved ones.

Right now, the average annual price of a semi-private room in a Virginia nursing home is $70,080 or $5,840 per month. The average daily price of a private nursing home in a Virginia is $217, or $6,600 per month and $79,205 annually. While Virginia’s nursing home are the 27th costliest in the nation, they are more expensive than the nursing homes in their neighboring states of Tennessee, Kentucky, and North Carolina but less expensive than the neighboring Maryland, West Virginia, and District of Columbia nursing home averages.

Below is a snapshot of Virginia nursing home costs and ratings. You can also see our findings on our Virginia nursing home cost infographic.

Total Number of Nursing Homes: 301
Average Single Price: $217
Average Double Price: $192
Average Star Rating: 2.7 (out of 5)

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 10
4-Star: 75
3-Star: 159
2-Star: 41
1-Star: 16

The nursing home talk is a difficult one and most families avoid the discussion until the need is imminent. Caregiverlist believes and informed consumer is in the best position to make those critical long-term care choices. We are always updating our nursing home cost database and have released the latest costs and ratings for nursing homes nationwide.

Virginia seniors and their families should understand the costs of nursing homes in their chosen area, along with their overall ratings. Hospitals often discharge the senior to a nursing home for post-hospital stay rehabilitation after a stroke or major surgery. If the senior’s stay is longer than the Medicare-covered 100 days, those costs becomes out-of-pocket.

In-home caregiving can be an attractive option if 24-hour care is not needed. Many families will work with a quality home care agency for their senior care needs. The hourly rate for senior home care in Virginia can range from $14 to $28 per hour, depending on the location and level of care required, with the added benefit of one-on-one assistance. In home care agency caregivers are also fully vetted, insured, and taxed, per federal requirements.

Every family has to determine their own breaking point between cost and level of care. We recommend you consult with a professional who can come up with a financial action plan to anticipate future long-term care costs. They will help assess your future spending needs. Seniors and their family caregivers can research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.


Virginia Nursing Home Cost Infographic for October 2016

Caregiverlist has released the updated daily costs of nursing homes in Virginia. We found 301 nursing homes in Virginia; the average rate for a shared room is about $192 per day. Virginia nursing homes have an average Caregiverlist Star Rating of 2.7 out of 5 stars. Virginia's nursing homes are now the 27th costliest in the nation. Neighboring areas are both more expensive (West Virginia, Maryland, District of Columbia) and less expensive (Kentucky, Tennessee, North Carolina.) 


West Virginia Nursing Home Cost Infographic for September 2016

Caregiverlist has released the daily rates of nursing homes in West Virginia. With 133 nursing homes, the average cost for a shared room is about $245 per day. West Virginia nursing homes hold an average Caregiverlist Star Rating of 2.5 out of 5 stars. West Virginia's nursing homes are now the 12th costliest in the nation, and more expensive than the nursing homes found in any of its neighboring states.


Rhode Island Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

Rhode Island is The Ocean State. And although it’s a beautiful state, with hundreds of miles of coastline, picture-perfect New England towns, and home to venerable ivy league Brown University, Wallethub recently cited the state of Rhode Island dead-last in the nation if you’re looking for a permanent and affordable place to retire.

Rhode Island doesn’t have the most expensive nursing homes in New England; that title goes to neighboring Connecticut. Rhode Island is the 10th costliest state in the nation for nursing home costs. The average annual price of a double room is $94,170 or $7,847 per month. However, you’ll find many quality nursing homes in Rhode Island. Over half of the state’s 87 nursing homes are rated 4 stars or better (out of 5 stars.)

Here’s a snapshot of the Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Index for Rhode Island for August 2016

Total Number of Nursing Homes: 87
Average Single Price: $288
Average Double Price: $258

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 7
4-Star: 47
3-Star: 27
2-Star: 3
1-Star: 3
Average Rating: 3.2

You can also see Rhode Island nursing home costs at-a-glance with our Rhode Island Nursing Home Cost infographic.

Which is the Rhode Island nursing home with the highest overall Caregiverlist star rating? The Rhode Island nursing home with the highest Caregiverlist® rating is privately-owned Briarcliffe Manor in Johnston, Rhode Island, which scores 4.6 out of 5 stars, no mean feat for a facility with 122 beds. The cost of rooms at Briarcliffe are slightly higher than the average Rhode Island nursing home — $325 and $300 for single and double rooms respectively (and certainly not the costliest in the state) but in this case, you may get what you pay for. And what is it that you get? I spoke with owner/administrator Akshay Talwar JD, CPA, LLM, who lives on the campus alongside his senior residents. “I think much of our success is due to ownership presence,” says Mr. Talwar. “We are deeply vested in the quality of care and we have a personal connection with those for whom we provide long-term care.” Another factor in the success of Briarcliffe Manor, according to Mr. Talwar, is his staff. Some key supervisors and managers have been at Briarcliffe for as long as 20 years.

Senior care costs, especially those incurred by long-term nursing home stay, is something most people don’t think about until it’s too late, usually after the Medicare-paid first 100 days of post-hospital rehabilitation. A good place for families to begin anticipating future costs is by talking to a professional and coming up with a financial action plan. Seniors and their family caregivers can also research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.

Rhode Island Nursing Home Cost Infographic for August 2016

Caregiverlist has released the daily rates of nursing homes in Rhode Island. With 87 nursing homes, the average cost for a shared room is about $258 per day. Rhode Island nursing homes hold an average Caregiverlist Star Rating of 3.2 out of 5 stars. Rhode Island's nursing homes are now the 10th costliest in the nation, but less expensive than its neighboring states.

Maine Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

I’d like to retire to Maine — and that’s not just my love of lobster talking. I’d If I do retire there, I won’t be alone. Maine has one of the highest percentage of senior populations in the U.S., second only to Florida, according to the World Atlas. Unfortunately, Maine seniors are experiencing a housing crisis, with limited access to affordable, quality homes. The situation is so dire that many Maine seniors are forced into institutional housing before they really need to be there. A situation like this is why it is so important to be aware of the costs of long-term care near you.

The average annual price of a semi-private room in a Maine nursing home is $91,980, or $7,665 per month, according to our July 2016 database update. The average annual price of a private nursing home in a Maine is $99,280, or $8,273 per month. While Maine’s nursing home are the 10th costliest in the nation, they are less expensive than the nursing homes in their neighboring states, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts. The average Caregiverlist Star Rating is higher as well — 3.3 out of 5, compared to New Hampshire and Vermont, who each score an average of 3.1 out of 5 stars, and Massachusetts, whose average Caregiverlist Star Rating is 2.9.

Below is a snapshot of Maine nursing home costs and ratings. You can also see our findings on our Maine nursing home cost infographic.

Snapshot
Total Number of Nursing Homes: 110
Average Single Price: $276
Average Double Price: $252

Caregiverlist Nursing Home Star Rating
5-Star: 15
4-Star: 62
3-Star: 27
2-Star: 1
1-Star: 5
Average : 3.3 (out of 5) stars

Maine seniors and their families should understand the costs of nursing homes in their area, along with their overall ratings. Hospitals often discharge the senior to a nursing home for post-hospital stay rehabilitation after a stroke or major surgery. If the senior’s stay is longer than the Medicare-covered 100 days, those costs becomes out-of-pocket. The nursing home talk is a difficult one and most families avoid the discussion until the need is imminent. Caregiverlist believes and informed consumer is in the best position to make those critical long-term care choices. We are always updating our nursing home database to provide the latest costs and ratings for nursing homes nationwide.

In-home caregiving can be an attractive option if 24-hour care is not needed. Many families will work with a quality home care agency for their senior care needs. The hourly rate for senior home care in Maine can range from $16 to $34 per hour, depending on the location and level of care required, with the added benefit of one-on-one assistance. “We have been able to help families stretch their savings to cover elder care costs and at the same time provide compassionate care that goes above and beyond in the home,” says Sonia Garcia of FirstLight Home Care of Southern Maine. “We become part of the family and offer a safe, engaging and nurturing care that lessens the worry for families.” A quality home care agency will also conduct the necessary background check and provide all liability and worker's compensation insurance protections and payroll taxes as required by law.

Each family has to determine their own breaking point between cost and level of care. We recommend you consult with a professional who can come up with a financial action plan to anticipate future long-term care costs. They will help assess your future spending needs.

Caregiverlist can also provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in Maine and help you learn about the costs for senior care. Seniors and their family caregivers can research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.

Maine Nursing Home Cost Infographic for July 2016

Caregiverlist has released the daily rates of nursing homes in Maine. With 110 nursing homes, the average cost for a shared room is about $252 per day. Maine nursing homes hold an average Caregiverlist Star Rating of 3.3 out of 5 stars. Maine's nursing homes are the 10th costliest in the nation, but the least expensive of the Northeastern states.

Discounts for Seniors

The poverty rate among seniors in America is already high and growing. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that the poverty rate for Americans 65 and older rose (albeit slightly) from 8.9 percent in 2009 to 9.0 percent in 2010. The growing cost of food, housing, and especially medical care, which tends to increase as we age, adds to economic instability for many of our elderly.

Sure, Social Security is a net to help prevent seniors from abject poverty, but recent economic recessions have forced many older Americans, those without employment income, to live hand-to-mouth. In many instances, seniors deplete their savings to a point that they are outliving their money.

Former Caregiverlist Sherpa Vera Perekoteyeva, who is always on the lookout for ways to help seniors and their caregivers, passed along this link from MOGUL that lists discounts available for older consumers; some discounts apply for those as young as 50 years old.

While senior discounts won’t cure the ill of elderly poverty, every dollar saved is a win. Discounts can be had across the board of consumer goods and services. Many times the only prerequisite for savings (besides age) is you have to ASK for the senior discount.

Senior discounts for restaurants tend to be found in fast-food and chain establishments. Caregiverlist is a great proponent of aging well which includes nutritious eating. Remember  that you can find healthy dining options, even at fast-food restaurants.

Here are the top senior discounts for 2015 making their rounds on the web (caveat — this list is found on many sites all over the web; I have not verified these discounts, if you ask for them and are met with a blank stare, don’t shoot the messenger!):

RESTAURANTS:

  • Applebee’s: 15% off with Golden Apple Card (60+)
  • Arby’s: 10% off (55+)
  • Ben & Jerry’s: 10% off (60+)
  • Bennigan’s: discount varies by location (60+)
  • Bob’s Big Boy: discount varies by location (60+)
  • Boston Market: 10% off (65+)
  • Burger King: 10% off (60+)
  • Chick-Fil-A: 10% off or free small drink or coffee (55+)
  • Chili’s: 10% off (55+)
  • CiCi’s Pizza: 10% off (60+)
  • Denny’s: 10% off, 20% off for AARP members (55+)
  • Dunkin’ Donuts: 10% off or free coffee (55+)
  • Einstein’s Bagels: 10% off baker’s dozen of bagels (60+)
  • Fuddrucker’s: 10% off any senior platter (55+)
  • Gatti’s Pizza: 10% off (60+)
  • Golden Corral: 10% off (60+)
  • Hardee’s: $0.33 beverages everyday (65+)
  • IHOP: 10% off (55+)
  • Jack in the Box: up to 20% off (55+)
  • KFC: free small drink with any meal (55+)
  • Long John Silver’s: various discounts at locations (55+)
  • McDonald’s: discounts on coffee everyday (55+)
  • Mrs. Fields: 10% off at participating locations (60+)
  • Shoney’s: 10% off Sonic: 10% off or free beverage (60+)
  • Steak ‘n Shake: 10% off every Monday & Tuesday (50+)
  • Subway: 10% off (60+)
  • Sweet Tomatoes: 10% off (62+)
  • Taco Bell: 5% off; free beverages for seniors (65+)
  • TCBY: 10% off (55+)
  • Tea Room Cafe: 10% off (50+)
  • Village Inn: 10% off (60+)
  • Waffle House: 10% off every Monday (60+)
  • Wendy’s: 10% off (55+)
  • White Castle: 10% off (62+)

RETAIL & APPAREL:

  • Banana Republic: 10% off (50+)
  • Bealls: 20% off first Tuesday of each month (55+)
  • Belk’s: 15% off first Tuesday of every month (55+)
  • Bon-Ton Department Stores: 15% off on senior discount days (55+)
  • C.J. Banks: 10% off every Wednesday (60+)
  • Clarks: 10% off (62+)
  • Dress Barn: 10% off (55+)
  • Goodwill: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)
  • Hallmark: 10% off one day a week (date varies by location)
  • Kohl’s: 15% off (60+)
  • Marshall’s: 20% off every Tuesday (55+)
  • Modell’s Sporting Goods: 10% off
  • Rite Aid: 10% off on Tuesdays & 10% off prescriptions
  • Ross Stores: 10% off every Tuesday (55+)
  • TJ Maxx: 10% off every Tuesday (55+)
  • The Salvation Army Thrift Stores: up to 50% off (55+)
  • Stein Mart: 20% off red dot/clearance items first Monday of every month (55+)

GROCERY:

  • Albertson’s: 10% off first Wednesday of each month (55+)
  • American Discount Stores: 10% off every Monday (50+)
  • Compare Foods Supermarket: 10% off every Wednesday (60+)
  • DeCicco Family Markets: 5% off every Wednesday (60+)
  • Fry’s Supermarket: free Fry’s VIP Club Membership & 10% off every Monday (55+)
  • Great Valu Food Store: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
  • Gristedes Supermarket: 10% off every Tuesday (60+)
  • Harris Teeter: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
  • Hy-Vee: 5% off one day a week (date varies by location)
  • Kroger: 10% off (date varies by location)
  • Morton Williams Supermarket: 5% off every Tuesday (60+)
  • The Plant Shed: 10% off every Tuesday (50+)
  • Publix: 5% off every Wednesday (55+)
  • Rogers Marketplace: 5% off every Thursday (60+)
  • Uncle Guiseppe’s Marketplace: 5% off (62+)

TRAVEL:
Airlines:

  • Alaska Airlines: 10% off (65+)
  • American Airlines: various discounts for 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
  • Continental Airlines: no initiation fee for Continental Presidents Club & special fares for select destinations
  • Southwest Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
  • United Airlines: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
  • U.S. Airways: various discounts for ages 65 and up (call before booking for discount)
  • Amtrak: 15% off (62+)
  • Greyhound: 5% off (62+)
  • Trailways Transportation System: various discounts for ages 50+

Car Rental:

  • Alamo Car Rental: up to 25% off for AARP members
  • Avis: up to 25% off for AARP members Best Western: 10% off (55+)
  • Budget Rental Cars: 10% off; up to 20% off for AARP members (50+)
  • Dollar Rent-A-Car: 10% off (50+)
  • Enterprise Rent-A-Car: 5% off for AARP members
  • Hertz: up to 25% off for AARP members
  • National Rent-A-Car: up to 30% off for AARP members

Hotels:

  • Cambria Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Clarion Motels: 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Comfort Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Comfort Suites: 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Econo Lodge: 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Hampton Inns & Suites: 10% off when booked 72 hours in advance
  • Holiday Inn: 10%-30% off depending on location (62+)
  • Hyatt Hotels: 25%-50% off (62+)
  • InterContinental Hotels Group: various discounts at all hotels (65+)
  • Mainstay Suites: 10% off with Mature Traveler’s Discount (50+); 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Marriott Hotels: 15% off (62+)
  • Motel 6: 10% off (60+)
  • Myrtle Beach Resort: 10% off (55+)
  • Quality Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Rodeway Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)
  • Sleep Inn: 20%-30% off (60+)

ACTIVITIES & ENTERTAINMENT:

  • AMC Theaters: up to 30% off (55+)
  • Bally Total Fitness: up to $100 off memberships (62+)
  • Busch Gardens Tampa, FL: $3 off one-day tickets (50+)
  • Carmike Cinemas: 35% off (65+)
  • Cinemark/Century Theaters: up to 35% off
  • U.S. National Parks: $10 lifetime pass; 50% off additional services including camping (62+)
  • Regal Cinemas: 30% off Ripley’s Believe it or Not: @ off one-day ticket (55+)
  • SeaWorld Orlando, FL: $3 off one-day tickets (50+)

CELL PHONE DISCOUNTS:

  • AT&T: Special Senior Nation 200 Plan $29.99/month (65+)
  • Jitterbug: $10/month cell phone service (50+)
  • Verizon Wireless: Verizon Nationwide 65 Plus Plan $29.99/month (65+)

MISCELLANEOUS:

  • Great Clips: $3 off hair cuts (60+)
  • Super Cuts: $2 off haircuts (60+)

The serious issue of senior poverty won’t be resolved with 10 percent discounts. If you are in or near Chicago over the next few days, The Aging in America Conference will be held from March 23-27 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago, where over 2,500 attendees from across the nation and abroad will discuss issues of aging and quality of life for older adults. On Thursday, March 26, from 9-10am, Paul Nathanson, JD, Special Counsel, National Senior Citizens Law Center will present Let’s Talk Senior Poverty: What Are We Doing About It? Learn more about ASA’s Aging in America Conference here.

Cruise Ship Retirement: Assisted Living on the High Seas?

Last month I read the USA Today story about Lee Wachtstetter, an 86-year-old Florida widow who sold her Fort Lauderdale home (and acreage) and to live a “stress-free, fairy-tale life” aboard Crystal Cruise Line's 11-year-old ship, Crystal Serenity.

Retiring as a permanent resident on a luxury cruise ship isn’t cheap. “Mama Lee” estimates she pays $164,000 per year, or about $450 per day, for her lifestyle. That cost includes her single occupancy stateroom, all meals (and the ubiquitous buffets,) beverages, gratuities, housekeeping, cocktail parties, movies, lectures, Broadway-type shows, and her favorite, nightly ballroom dancing — not to mention travelling to every city around the world that has a port. As long as Ms. Lee doesn’t become acutely ill or need special medical attention, which can get pricey on-board, cruise ship retirement seems like a pretty glamorous and exotic way to live out one’s golden years.

Or is it?

The Straight Dope’s Cecil Adams tackled this topic in a June 2012 article and compares cruise ship retirement with luxury hotel retirement, except the retiree gets to travel the world instead of being stuck in one place. Temperate climates and nightly sunsets on a vast horizon make cruise ship retirement sound like a better alternative to staid assisted living, but only if the senior is in the best of health and doesn’t mind traveling light. Ship staterooms can be cramped, especially when one is on a budget. Sleeping quarters aside, the entire ship and all its amenities are at your service.

While the employee-to-guest ratio is generally higher on a ship than the staff-to-resident ratio in most assisted living communities, those employees aren’t as likely to be trained for the special needs presented by older adults. And sure, the amenities are great, but if the ship breaks out in norovirus, as happened twice recently on Royal Caribbean's cruise line, those with compromised immune systems, such as the elderly, would be hardest hit. And there’s nowhere to run (no pun intended.)

While a long-term passenger might miss family and friends, how many receive sporadic visits, at best, when they reside in assisted living facilities? As seniors become more comfortable with technology, they can keep in touch through Facebook and email. Right now, video bandwidth is limited; most ships block or limit Skype. For face-to-face visits, onshore connections using free Wi-Fi in port with a smartphone may be the best route.

But what about the actual dollar cost? In 2004, geriatrics doctors Lee Lindquist and Robert Golub published an article in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society which showed that cruises were priced similarly to assisted living centers could accommodate the needs of seniors and possibly provide a more desirable option to seniors for retirement. In their hypothetical, an 80-year old woman, for example would pay $228,075 in an assisted-living facility compared to $230,497 on a cruise ship over a 20-year time span.

More recently, however, Genworth’s 2014 Cost of Care Survey listed Washington, D.C. as the most costly spot for assisted living, with an annual median cost of about  $82,600 for a single-occupancy unit. Assisted living costs usually cover room and board, basic utilities (electricity, heat, water, and garbage), basic housekeeping (fresh linens) and some meals, significantly less than the price tag for Ms. Wachtstetter's cruise ship retirement lifestyle. It’s difficult to compare apples-to-apples, but it seems only like the least expensive cruise costs might be similar to a highest-end assisted living community.

Have you or a family member ever thought of cruise ship retirement as a viable option? I’d love to hear from assisted living community and cruise ship directors alike as to why theirs is the best retirement option. Or if you happen to read this while on an extended cruise, let us know what that's like. As for me, I think I’d like to summer on land and winter at sea, as long as I can have access to the helipad for quick escapes from either.

Facts About Senior Care

So few of us plan for our long term care, yet the majority of us will need to avail ourselves of professional senior care at some point in our lives. By 2030, the U.S. population aged 65+ will exceed 70 million. According to the American Geriatrics Society, the vast majority of these older persons will have at least one chronic disease, and substantial numbers need assistance in performing basic and more advanced activities of daily living

There are a variety of professional senior care options to choose from, based on need and cost. Most seniors prefer to age-in-place, at home. If there is no family member to care for them, many times professional in-home care, provided by a trusted Home Care Agency is the go-to option. Residential options include Independent and Assisted Living Communities, and nursing homes. Nursing home costs vary widely based upon the state in which you live.

Our good friend, colleague, and elder law expert Ben Neiburger writes about the five key facts of long-term care.

1. Statistics
Nearly 41% of people under 65 and approximately 70% of people who live to age 65 will need some type of long-term care.
2. Medicare
Medicare covers skilled short-term medical care as well as short-term assistance with nursing home costs, but only if the circumstances meet strict requirements. However in most situations, this is simply not a viable long-term care option for most people.
3. Medicaid
Medicaid is a state-based program supplemented by Federal funds that provide health services to the poor and impoverished. Medicaid might cover your loved one, if he or she meets your state’s poverty criteria.
Many people attempt to spend down their assets to state-required levels or transfer their assets to family members to become eligible for Medicaid, but the state has the right to look back into your finances for 5 years before the date you apply for coverage, and may refuse to pay for your long-term care if you don’t handle your money “appropriately” during those 5 years.
4. Nursing Homes and other Long Term Care
Both Medicare and health insurance are intended to cover skilled, short-term medical care as you recover from an illness or injury—NOT long-term care. That means a health insurance policy rarely covers ongoing long-term care, especially if one is over 65.
5. Private Pay
Personal savings are one way to cover long-term care expenses. Keep in mind however, that in 2011, the national average annual cost of long-term care services in a semi-private nursing home room was $75,555. Since the average length of stay in a nursing home is 2.4 years, that would come to approximately $181,000 out of your savings.

We now know that, due to the longevity of our nation’s population, most of us will indeed need long-term care. Seniors once relied upon family members for elder care, and while there are many, many family caregivers (43.5 million of adult family caregivers care for someone 50+ years of age), many seniors will need to look to professional caregivers for their senior care needs.

Ways to pay for care that don’t include Medicare, Medicaid, or private pay includes long-term care insurance and reverse mortgages. Be vigilant in your research, however. Some long-term care insurance pays only for nursing homes and not for in-home senior care.
A reverse mortgage has its own pitfalls, making it an option of last resort.

U.S. veterans may be eligible for Veteran’s Aid & Attendance Benefit. For this benefit, you’ll need to apply and be persistent and patient. Those wheels tend to grind slowly.

Caregiverlist® understands the process involved in finding the right senior care can be arduous. Estate planning can assist you in determining your best options in how to pay for professional senior care for you or your senior family member.  

Ben Neiburger is an active member of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) and a member of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors for the Illinois Institute of Continuing Legal Education and through frequent speaking engagements and ongoing course work both locally and nationally, is in continuous pursuit of knowledge and insight to the laws and finances that affect our families and senior citizens. He brings this wealth of knowledge, his clear and common sense explanations, his patience, gentle humor and sensitivity to each of his legal consultations.To learn more about Elder Law, visit generationlaw.com.

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