Digital Alternative Medicine to Hit Market in 2014

New technology continues to change our lives. Today almost everyone has a smartphone or knows someone who does. And now, technology will soon remind us when to take our medicines as well as eliminating lapses between refills, as missed pills and improper doses is one of the major causes of more health complications. To solve this problem, advances in medicine can eliminate harmful side effects that come with people misusing their medication. Digital drugs and digital bottles are expected to hit the market in 2014 or early 2015.

Pills with sensors, the size of a grain of sand, are in the process of development by Proteus Digital Health.  The sensor in the pill track who is taking the medicine.  The data transfers to a one-use strip worn on the taker’s skin and then sent to a mobile application.  At the user’s consent, their caregiver, doctor or family can access this information.

Seniors are a target market for the pills designed by Proteus Digital Health, notes chief executive Andrew Thompson.  Because older patients take multiple medications, these technologically advanced pills can help seniors stay organized and on schedule and avoid serious health consequences.

Digital medicine is the up and coming technology that will help caregivers juggle all their other tasks at hand.  With this help, no confusion will face the caregiver whether or not their senior has taken their medication.  For those that may be concerned about a digitalized pill, there are other options that help caregivers and seniors with notifications via bottle.

Medicine bottles that glow different colors have been created by AdhereTech Inc. When it’s time to take a dose, the bottle glows blue. When the user has missed a dose, the bottle glows red.  The company’s server can also remind the consumer via text.

Medication past the expiration date can be clearly indicated by bottles generated by the product-design firm IDEO.  When the pills are expired, the bottle starts to spot like an overripe banana.  This idea is still in the concept stage, but will surely help people know their medication is no longer safe to take.

Nursing homes can also take notice to all these developments in medicine. With aid by technology, nursing homes and assisted living staff members can easily keep track of who took their medication and whose medication has expired.  For those who are seeking assistance in nursing homes, Caregiverlist.com has a database of over 18,000 nursing homes with options to filter by Caregiverlist’s Star Rating system. Finding the right nursing home for your loved one can be made efficiently and very quickly.

 

-Kristin Kruk

 

Registered Nurse Safe Staffing Act of 2013 Endorsed by American Nurses Association

Family caregivers for seniors and professional caregivers truly know the challenges of caring for a senior while they are in a hospital or nursing home which include pitching in to assist the staff.  Many times a Registered Nurse of Certified Nursing Aide simply cannot keep up with all of their patient's needs because they have too many patients or residents to care for during their shift.  Many time nursing homes will even tell families they must bring in their own paid senior caregiver if they want certain tasks managed.

As the owner of a senior home care agency in Chicago, we often had nursing homes such as Warren-Barr, in downtown Chicago, introduce our services at the same time they did the intake with a family for a new senior resident.  They were upfront about the fact that they staffed one Certified Nursing Aide for every 12 or more residents.  We had senior clients in the nursing home who would not be taken for a shower if they did not have a private caregiver.  

Staffing challenges are very real for Registered Nurses who must manage all of the nursing aides and caregivers and often pitch in to perform hands-on care themselves when they do not have adequate staffing.  This is part of the reason for high-turnover in the industry for C.N.A.'s and R.N.'s working at hospitals and nursing homes.

The American Nurses Association has endorsed the bi-partisan Registered Nurse Safe Staffing Act of 2013 which would make hospitals who receive Medicare funding accountable for providing adequate nursing staff to deliver better care and improve patient safety.  The ANA says ongoing research continues to show that higher staffing levels by experienced RN's are linked to lower rates of patient falls, infections, medications errors and even death.

Similar legislation has been introduced previously in at least 5 sessions of Congress. Some have included protection for nurse whistle-blowers and restrictions on mandatory overtime.  All bills have died in committee.

The current Registered Nurse Safe Staffing Act of 2013 includes:

  • Requiring hospitals to establish committees that would create unit-by-unit nurse staffing plans based on multiple factors, including the number of patients, severity of the patient's conditions, experience and skill level of the RN's, and the availability of support staff and technological resources.
  • Require hospitals that participate in Medicare to publicly report nurse staffing plans for each unit.
  • Limit the practice of "floating" nurses by ensuring "that RN's are not forced to work on units if they lack the education and experience in that specialty.
  • Allow imposition of civil monetary penalites for knowing violations
  • Provide whistle-blower protections for those who file a complaint about staffing.

Nurse staffing levels and fatigue are repeatedly cited as the primary or secondary factor for accidental events every year.  One of the licensing requirements for hospitals and nursing homes is to have "the necessary staff to support the care, treatment and services it provide" to patients or residents.

Caregiverlist's Nursing Home Directory includes the C.N.A.-to-resident staffing ratio at nursing homes which is often just 1 C.N.A. to every 12 o 15 residents.  Burnout occurs and then what follows is high turnover of C.N.A. employees.  However, some facilities do not experience the 50% or higher turnover because they provide adequate staffing levels, support and benefits to the Certified Nursing Assistants.

C.N.A.'s often will migrate to working for professional senior home care agencies, simply because they enjoy the benefit of providing one-on-one care to just one senior.  Many C.N.A.'s tell us they prefer senior home care because of the quality care they can deliver when just caring for one person at a time. Caregiverlist's Career Center provides information on working as a professional senior caregiver which may require formal training and certification in some states.

Senior home care agencies hire 3 to 6 new caregivers or C.N.A.'s each week, as the industry has grown by more than 40% since 2008.  You may apply for a companion caregiver position on Caregiverlist, reaching multiple companies with just one application.  You may also research Certified Nursing Aide programs and refer-a-friend to a senior caregiver job as the industry is constantly looking for more quality caregivers.

 

 

 

 

Happy Mother's Day to Our Caregivers and Today's Babies Who Will Live to be age 110+

Today we celebrate Mother's Day and those caregivers who are finding themselves caring for their Mothers and dealing with the transition of perhaps now playing the role of Mother to their own Mom.  Happy Mother's Day to you, however you may have entered into the position!

Motherhood will continue to evolve as the latest news shows a baby born today will have a very good chance of living to be 110-years-old and more than half will surpass age 100.  Living for a century will no longer be rare.  Scientists at the University of California are studying how to prolong life and crossing the bridge into this new territory that ignites emotions and moral questions.

Peter Thiel, the PayPal co-founder, is one Venture Capitalist financing the research into how to prolong life.  He sees death as a problem we may be able to solve.  However, this type of scientific research is still considered on the fringe of science and includes growing new organs for human stem cells, creating body parts and using gene therapy to treat hereditary diseases.

Mothers may soon be able to know that they can easily give birth later in life......we are already accepting of surrogates for women who are unable to carry a baby and so it may not be too far off to accept a surrogate simply because a women in her 50's decides she is ready to be a Mother.  If you are going to live to be 150, which of those 18 years do you want to stay homebound while rearing a child? Do you want wisdom or physical energy for Motherhood?

There will be much to debate as our society confronts a longer lifespan. If my great-grandmother lived to be 101-years-old and was born before there were airplanes and automobiles, it is natural to accept that soon grandparents will be living past 110. We know how to eat a healthy diet and keep our minds and bodies active to enjoy healthy aging.  We have medications and surgeries such as hip-replacements to replace our worn out parts.  I could live to be 110 and so could all of my friends.  Which also means more years living in Assisted Living communities, most likely, and more years needing a senior caregiver.  

Back in the year 1850, the average human lifespan was 43 years.  Now the average lifespan is around age 80.  And that is "average".  More and more of our mothers will definitely be living past the 100-year mark.

One researcher has organized the realities of living longer in this book, "100 Plus: How the Coming Age of Longevity Will Change Everything, From Careers and Relationships to Family and Faith," by Sonia Arrison.  She shares that some babies born today may be able to live to be 150 years old.

Enjoy your time being a caregiver to your Mom today, or to someone who is like a mother to you. 

Caregivers: Report Medicare Fraud and Receive Financial Reward

Medicare and Medicaid fraud have been a huge contributor to high costs of health care for seniors, with both improper reimbursements and unnecessary treatments and billings.  We are talking about billions of dollars in fraud.  The Department of Health and Human Services is now increasing the reward for anyone who reports fraud to as much as 15% of the amount recovered up to $9.9 million (and since billions of dollars in fraud has taken place, this maximum, unfortunately, is needed).  Here is their revised whistleblower reward program for those turning in companies and doctors who are fraudulently billing Medicare.
 
Medicare's new fraud alert reward has been modeled on an IRS program that has returned $2 billion in fraud penalties and unpaid taxes since 2003, the Health and Human Services Department says.
 
Senior caregivers who feel a senior is receiving medical treatment that is unnecessary or received medical doctor invoices for services that were not performed should call the Inspector General's hotline to report Medicare fraud.
 
The proposed rule would also strengthen certain provider enrollment provisions. One would allow HHS to deny enrollment of providers who are affiliated with an entity that has unpaid Medicare debt. It also would allow CMS to deny or revoke billing privileges for individuals with felony convictions, and revoke privileges for providers and suppliers who are abusing their billing privileges.
 
Under the proposed rule, HHS also would expand the ability of its Senior Medicare Patrol program to educate more Medicare beneficiaries about suspicious billing by providers that could be evidence of fraudulent activities. Total funding for all the 54 current SMP projects amounts to $7.3 million.
 
The Scooter Store has been a recent Medicare and Medicaid fraud spotlight for their laser focus on taking advantage of a high reimbursement for power wheelchairs for seniors - only they decided to give seniors cheaper scooters instead of high quality wheelchairs and even went so far as to have a network of medical doctors "approve" the senior's need for the power wheelchair.  
 
However, the federal government must also take some responsibility for The Scooter Store exploitation, simply because their juicy fees attracted The Scooter Store to play the fraud game. But of course the old reimbursements that were fat and juicy were due to lobbying by these groups.  The Wall Street Journal investigation also exposed that home health companies received a $2,000 bonus after the 10th R.N. home visit, and guess what?  The largest home health agencies always made sure they had 10 visits. This was not set-up to benefit seniors, but just another example of payments that make it into legislation due to strong lobbying.
 
Obama Care, as the new healthcare law has been labeled, does have some very positive aspects which include "accountability of care".  In addition, some Medicare reimbursements which were a bit unnecessary (i.e., would never survive in the private sector), were revamped.
 
Power wheelchairs payments were formerly paid in one lump sum by Medicare. Profits of thousands of dollars per wheelchair were pocketed by The Scooter Store immediately.  As of last year, though, this changed and a more reasonable rental fee was paid for the power wheelchairs.  Then The Scooter Store ran into cash flow issues and this, according to some former employees, stimulated even more aggressiveness to "get approval by a medical doctor" for a power wheelchair for a senior - going to 3 doctors or more and even coding doctors based on how difficult or easy it would be to get them to approve the wheelchair.
 
A whistleblower turned in The Scooter Store several years ago and this placed them under more scrutiny as they continued to push the envelope by selling power wheelchairs to individuals who did not really need one.  They even sent out direct mail promotions advertising they could obtain a "Free" wheelchair for seniors.  
 
Caregivers can help be the watchdog for Medicare fraud.  As senior caregivers are involved with day-to-day care, you have the inside view of all medical care and can quickly see when something seems unnecessary.  As more fraud is stopped, it is hope the senior care dollars will go towards actually paying for senior care.
 

Seniors Saving Billions a Year on Prescription Drugs Thanks to Affordable Care Act

Doughnut holes are for pastry shops, right?  Wrong.  Not when it comes to our friendly Congress passing legislation that makes no sense.  A doughnut hole was actually included in the previous prescription drug benefit for seniors and recently corrected in the new healthcare law - it was a hole in payouts for benefits.  And when this type of legislation happens, it does spark the thought that lobbying can be very successful.  The prescription drug companies have spent millions lobbying Congress and as Open Secrets publishes, the drug company's lobbying dollars match when the legislation gets passed.

So this silly doughnut hole was labeled as such because as a senior you would have a benefit to pay for your prescription drug until you took a big enough bite and hit the "hole" and then there was no benefit paid until you got to the other side of the hole and then it would pay again.  Meanwhile, for whatever your health condition is, you need this medication so seniors were very stressed about how they would pay for it while in the "doughnut hole".

I was invited to serve on a research panel, which the government paid for just to make sure that seniors really were confused by their prescription drug plan and that everyone thought the doughnut hole was silly.  As I told them, what private paid healthcare plan would ever sell any such thing?  They wouldn't, because nobody would buy it.  


However, the good news is this:  
the new healthcare law - nicknamed "Obama Care", has saved seniors $6 billion dollars in prescription drug benefits because it eliminated this doughnut hole.  Here is the Health and Human Services news release on the announcement.

 

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius announced this week that more than 6.3 million people with Medicare saved over $6.1 billion on prescription drugs because of the new health care law.

“By making prescription drugs more affordable, the Affordable Care Act is improving and promoting the best care for people with Medicare,” Secretary Sebelius said.

The Affordable Care Act makes Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) more affordable by gradually closing the gap in coverage where beneficiaries must pay the full cost of their prescriptions out of pocket. This gap is known as the donut hole.

People with Medicare in the doughnut hole now receive discounts when they purchase prescription drugs at a pharmacy or order them through the mail, until they reach the catastrophic coverage phase.  The Affordable Care Act gave those who reached the donut hole in 2010 a one-time $250 check, then began phasing in discounts and coverage for brand-name and generic prescription drugs beginning in 2011.  The law will provide additional savings each year until the coverage gap is closed in 2020.

In 2013, the health care law increases the discounts and savings to 52.5 percent of the cost of most brand name drugs and 21 percent of the cost of covered generic drugs.

Also under the Affordable Care Act, those who choose to enroll in Medicare Advantage and Part D now have access to a wider range of high-quality plan choices, with more four- and five-star plans than were previously available.  The Affordable Care Act continues to make Medicare more secure, with new tools and enhanced authority to crack down on criminals who cheat the program.

Learn more about how the Affordable Care Act closes the doughnut hole.

Review state-by-state information on savings in the doughnut hole.

Learn about senior care costs for long-term care and find nursing homes in your area as you plan for all your senior care needs.

Caregiver's Job to Help Seniors Stay Fit in Winter

Winter storms drive even the most hale and hearty of us to seek the shelter of warmth indoors. While it’s enticing to stay inside by a roaring fire (or space heater) snuggled under a blanket with a favorite book, I think we can all agree, and studies show, exercise is just as important, if not more so, in the winter than other times of the year. So it’s imperative to get up and get moving.

Fitness classes for seniors are a great option, as is a simple walk around the mall. But what about the transport? In inclement weather, even getting in and out of a car can be daunting. How does a senior, with limited mobility on the best of days, keep strong, flexible and fit when snow and ice keeps them housebound?

Caregivers can help with a regiment of at home exercises for seniors. Remember — it’s always important to consult a doctor before starting a home workout plan.

Ideally, a comprehensive workout plan will address endurance, strength, flexibility and balance.

If possible, invest in a low-impact piece of exercise equipment, such as a stationary bike. It’s great aerobic exercise and will strengthen leg muscles. For those who are very limited in their mobility, check out the Sit and Be Fit series, either on YouTube or your local PBS station. Learn about Chair Yoga, which is a great way to increase blood flow and fluidity of movement.

Resistance bands and free weights, if used with caution, can increase muscle mass and promote strength. Building strength can help counteract the weakness and frailty usually associated with aging.

Balance is a special concern for the elderly. According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention), one in every three adults 65 years and older falls. Many times those falls can cause severe injuries, such as breaks and head traumas. Regular exercise will help a senior bounce back more quickly from an injury or illness, as well as help prevent those falls in the first place.

Exercise is an essential part of aging well. Exercise helps alleviate depression — which can be a problem for the elderly, especially during these dark, cold months. It can also help prevent osteoporosis, keep diabetes at bay, enhance energy, and generally make a person feel better. If you’re not sure where to start, consult a physical therapist or senior fitness expert. If I’m a caregiver, that’s a gift I want to give to the senior for whom I care. That’s a gift I want to give to myself.

If you are a senior caregiver, consider Caregiverlist’s Caregiver Training and Certification. One of the training modules deals specifically with promoting and maintaining good mobility, and that’s a skill that will make you more attractive to future employers.

Caregiver Pay Average $10 per Hour and $120 per day

Caregiver pay results from the Caregiverlist Employment Index compiled from survey results of more than 18,000 professional caregiver job applicants in 2012 shows $10 per hour and $120 per day as the national average for professional caregiver pay.  

Caregiver pay at this rate is higher than the national minimum wage of $7.25 per hour and higher than the majority of minimum wages nationwide (states and cities may pass their own minimum wage laws and as long as they are more than the national minimum wage requirement, they will over-ride the national law). You may review minimum wage laws nationwide on Caregiverlist's By-state section.

Ten states passed an increase in minimum wage effective January, 2013, including Arizona raising their minimum wage to $7.80.  Other states raising minimum wages included Missouri increasing to $7.35 per hour, Colorado increasing to $7.78 per hour Ohio increasing to $7.85 per hour.

Meanwhile, two municipal cities in California require a much higher minimum wage, with San Francisco's minimum wage at $10.55 and San Jose's minimum wage at $10 per hour.  Of course, cost of living is higher in these cities which also enjoy being located in Silicon Valley, home of a higher percentage of millionaires due to the luck of the stock options for employees working for the fast-growth technology companies.

Caregivers will continue to be needed in the growing senior care industry which has experienced a 40% increase in the number of senior home care companies since 2008.

Becoming a professional senior caregiver requires a caring personality, successfully passing a criminal background check and basic caregiver training which can be obtained online or from the hiring senior care company.  Apply to be a senior caregiver with a professional senior care company in your area or refer-a-friend to be a senior caregiver and win a $50 gift certificate.

 

 

 

Geriatric Care Management Can Deliver Quality Care

Geriatric Care Managers are trained professionals who help families plan and manage senior care services. At some point in your lifetime, either you or one of your family members or friends may need extra assistance from a trustworthy, knowledgeable person to help them with their health care needs and household management.

Geriatric Care Managers assist seniors through the sometimes rough waters of senior care and map out a plan for the later years in life. Geriatric Care Managers are certified individuals who meet with seniors and their families and assess and then advise as they determine the best path or care or treatments needed. They then organize your life, and bring family members together to form a unit and prepare a plan for the good and bad times to come. This is especially valuable when there are complicated care needs, memory loss or adult children do not live near their parents.

Aging is never easy and many people are not well versed in how to handle this new phase in life. What does Medicare cover? What about Medicaid if you run out of private funds to pay for senior care needs? What if you are diagnosed with memory loss or another age-related illness? Where do you receive the best care and how do you plan for end-of-life care?

A good Geriatric Care Manager can help navigate the way to aging gracefully and enjoying the later years in life which we all work so hard to be able to enjoy. I had the opportunity to work as an aspiring Care Manager with some of the best professionals in senior care as part of a Florida geriatric care management service. I was taken under the wing of a true compassionate real-life miracle worker. She showed me how to work with families and not judge or change what each person wants.

One of the main things I learned is that people have different ideas or what their lives should be and the best way to help them is to ensure they have the proper structures in place to live safely. Last year I was given my very first case with a lovely little woman who had just suffered the loss of her husband of 60 years when he passed away on New Year’s Eve. He had been her caregiver who she had relied on fully as her adult children were living more than one thousand miles away. Her husband’s death was devastating for her but she did not show it on the outside.

The first time I met her she was cheerful and a gracious hostess, offering me frozen chocolate from her freezer and offering me her best wine. It wasn’t until spending the next few weeks with her that I realized just how life-changing losing her husband was for her. While she lived in Florida, her daughter lived a few states north and hired our service to be her Care Manager to help her in this major life transition. Her daughter’s work and family responsibilities prevented her from being able to be present full time and this is another example of when a geriatric care manager can be a valuable service to smooth out transitions as we age and lessen further disruptions to our families.

My sweet little senior lady had secretly stopped showering, was barely eating, and would try to give away everything in her home. This was her way of coping with the loss of her husband. The daughter thought it would be best to move her up north to live with her. So my new task was to help sort out her personal belongings in a non-invasive way, help her pack, organize the travel arrangements for her move, organize medications, set-up insurance and…..facilitate the sale of her husband’s belongings (he was a painter, body builder, wrestler,salesman, and magician!). They had many interesting possessions. In helping with this project I learned all about their life together and had the opportunity to help a family in need. We moved her up north with her daughter after 1 month of working with her and she currently lives there safely with her family.

Geriatric Care Managers are one way to receive assistance from those who have vast experience in senior care and understand both the emotional and physical challenges of aging. They know what works, what doesn’t work, and which course is the best to take. In a way--- hey get you there faster. Senior care options include nursing homes (Medicare only pays for up to 100 days in a nursing home after a major medical event), senior home care and moving to an Assisted Living community. Geriatric Care Managers can assist with all aspects of senior care and also inform families about the financial requirements of each senior care option as well as connect you with the top medical providers in your area.

Guest Blogger: Caregiverlist Sherpa Lauren Tyner.  Caregiverlist’s Job Applicant service connects senior care companies with the highest quality professional caregivers, Certified Nursing Aides and Certified Home Health Aides using proprietary technology to deliver efficiencies to the recruitment and hiring process. Caregiverlist’s Sherpas guide senior care companies on the best way to use the interactive hiring tools.

Lauren Tyner is in the photo below next to the Caregiverlist office, just under the real bridge to nowhere with Caregiverlist Sherpas Patrick Welch and Samantha Franklin on each side of her.

 

Seniors Appear to Follow Generational Voting

Election 2012 looms on the not-so-distant horizon. Political pundits look for data to slice and dice information about possible supporters. Constituents are wooed based on race, sex, religion, economics, as well as a host of other factors. This election season, there’s a new line being drawn in the sand and it marks a generational division.

According to the Pew Research Center’s The Generation Gap and the 2012 Election, this election especially is seeing a difference in the way people vote as informed by their generation.

Millennials were born between 1981 and 1993, and turned 18 somewhere between 1999 and 2011. Shaped by the politics and conditions of the Bill Clinton and George W. Bush presidencies, this group, according to the New York times “holds liberal attitudes on most social and governmental issues.” Staunch supporters of Obama in 2008, this time around they appear less politically engaged. This most diverse generation remains upbeat about the future.

Gen Xers were born between 1965 and 1980. They turned 18 between 1983 and 1998. Similar in views to their Millennial counterparts, they are mostly liberal, but have soured in their view of big government. This group experienced the Reagan era and voted both George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton into office. While giving most of their votes to Obama the first time around, currently their votes as a group are split between Obama and Romney.

Baby Boomers (1946-1964) turned 18 between 1964 and 1982. This largest group of registered voters have expressed their frustration with government as they face an uncertain financial future. Older Boomers tend to vote more Democratic than younger generation members, but this election sees the group vote shift as many must look to delaying their retirement.

The Silent Generation (1925-1945) 67-87– came of age between the late 1940s and early 1960s. This group of over 80% of Americans age 65 and older – has held historically conservative views. Once one of the most Democratic generations, the majority identify as conservatives and tend to vote the Republican Party. They prefer the GOP’s stance on most issues except for Social Security which, not surprisingly, is listed as this group’s main concern. They are vocal group and their vote may sway the entire election.

One group didn’t make it into the PRC’s study are our nation’s Centenarians. The relatively small voting group of those over born before 1925 (72,000 according to the Census Bureau) are, as a group, Obama supporters. Many cast their first votes for Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and may have even seen Theodore Roosevelt in the flesh. They saw the advent of women’s right to vote and many (but certainly not all) tend to vote Democratic. President Obama has a great showing among this group. And interestingly, because of aging well, this group is the fastest growing group in the country. Gallup points out that the generational divide exists primarily among non-Hispanic white voters. According to the poll, age makes little difference in voting preferences among nonwhites, more than 70% of whom support Obama regardless of their age category.

How about you? Do you fall in with your generation’s ideals? What social events shape your political views? Perhaps you are the caregiver to a Centenarian. Does their political outlook vary differently from yours? It will be interesting to watch the election results with an eye on the generation gap and how it will figure into the election results.

 

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Nurses' Rally Kicks off NATO Summit Protests

Nurses rallied together on Friday, May 18, in what was called “the first official protest of NATO” in Chicago’s downtown. More than 3,000 nurses, nurses aides and activists assembled to call for their "Robin Hood Tax" — a small sales tax on Wall Street transactions. With up to hundreds of transactions conducted every minute, the nurses said that the $350 billion per year generated by the proposed tax could help alleviate healthcare and education problems in communities.

Members of National Nurses United, organizers of the rally, dressed in nurse scrubs and green Robin Hood caps were joined by members of the Occupy movement in calling for equal taxation. The rally was predominantly peaceful, and the nurses stayed on message throughout the demonstration. Former Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello performed during the last 30 minutes.

It was Morello’s performance that threatened the NNU permit request because of the city’s concern that his appearance would push rally attendance at Daley Plaza over its capacity. Negotiations between the Nurses’ Union and the city resulted in a shortened rally — from five hours to two. The nurses made sure to make those two hours count.

“It's time for Wall Street to start paying what all the rest of us pay,” said Karen Higgins, Boston RN and co-president of the NNU. Advocating for the people the families for whom they care, the nurses carried placards calling for “Healthcare for All, Jobs with Dignity, Quality Public Education and A Healthy Environment.”

You can watch a part of the demonstration here:

The solidarity and caring shown by the nursing community was truly inspiring. As the need for caregivers continues to increase, training as a CNA seems to be a great first step to a fulfilling job and career.

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