Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features field full of wild and colorful flowers for caregivers to mentally walk through. Thank you caregivers for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on www.Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Stress Relief Photo of the Week Wild Flowers Field

"Feelings are everywhere, be gentle."

J. Masai

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features unique orchids, as a reminder for caregivers to take a moment to relief their daily stress and to celebrate who they are. Thank you for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on www.Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo Orchids

"Reading is to the mind what exercise is to the body."

Joseph Addison

 

 

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features vibrant, yet calming sunset from a tropical place. Thank you for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo Vibrant Sunset

"Prayer is the key of the morning and the bolt of the evening."

Mohandus K. Ghandi

Caregiverlist Summer Photo Contest for Senior Caregivers Accepting Submissions This July

Caregivers, Certified Nursing Aides, and Certified Home Health Aides, submit a photo of yourself with your senior client to the Caregiverlist Summer Photo Contest for Senior Caregivers. The contest starts Monday, July 8, 2013, and runs through Monday, July 29, 2013. Winners will be announced on Wednesday, July 31, 2013. The Caregiverlist Facebook page hosts the contest.

 

Contest winners will be chosen based on popularity via voting.  Caregiverlist will award $100, $50 and $25 Amazon gift cards to the top 3 voted pictures and free t-shirts to the runners-up.

 

Photo submissions that feature some creativity and uniqueness will bring competition to this contest. Caregiverlist expects that the caregivers, Certified Nursing Aides and Certified Home Health Aides who submit “fun” photos will gain more votes. Those who submit photos should share their photo across social networks and with friends and family to encourage more voting.

Caregivers may submit their photo on Facebook and vote for caregiver and senior photo submissions here.

Good luck!

Senior Care in Summer: Heat

The intense heat that grips the Southwest, interior Northwest and the Great Basin shows signs of easing somewhat, however, temperatures will continue to be higher than normal for the rest of the week.

Earlier this week, triple-digit heat struck Southern California and the record-breaking heat in Las Vegas may have led to the death man in his 80s, CNN reports. Paramedics found the man dead in his home, which did not have air conditioning.

In an recent blog, I wrote about the dangers of dehydration in seniors. But older adults are vulnerable to a variety of heat-related illnesses. The elderly are more prone to heat exhaustion and heat stroke, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Heat stress especially affects the elderly for a variety of reasons: they don’t adjust to sudden temperature changes as well as their younger counterparts. Prescription medications could hinder the body’s ability to regulate its temperature. Chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and dementia can make someone particularly susceptible to hot weather health problems.

Heat stroke symptoms include hallucinations, chills, confusion and dizziness, along with slurred speech. The CDC reports that common heat related symptoms can also include:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Fast and weak pulse rate
  • Fast and shallow breathing


The American Geriatrics Society’s Foundation for Health in Aging (FHIA) reports that most of the 200 Americans who die each summer of heat-related complications are over 50. They’ve prepared a handy tip sheet, "Hot Weather Safety Tips for Older Adults", available for download. Caregivers can help seniors stay safe with these recommendations:

Stay inside in air-conditioning. If there’s no air-conditioning in the home, go somewhere that is air-conditioned, like a movie theater, library or senior center. Fans DO NOT provide adequate cooling when temperatures hit 90 degrees.

  • Stay out of the sun. If they must go out, have them wear light, loose-fitting clothing and a  lightweight brimmed hat for shade. Also, apply a “broad spectrum” sunscreen with SPF 15 or higher.
  • Go out early in the morning or after the sun sets, when it’s cooler.
  • Have your senior drink cool water, juices or other liquids. Stay away from alcoholic beverages, which can dehydrate.
  • Give tepid (not too cold or too hot) showers, baths, or sponge baths. Or wet washcloths or towels with cool water and put them on wrists, ankles, armpits, and neck. This will also cool them down.

Keep yourself and your seniors safe and healthy this summer by taking these precautions. Senior caregivers can gain additional crucial caregiving skills by taking a 10-hour online Caregiver Certification training course.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features blue skies and interesting landscape. Thank you for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiverlist Stress Relief Photo of the Week

"Well done is better than well said."

Benjamin Franklin

National Nursing Assistant's Week—Caregiverlist Celebrates with T-Shirt Giveaway

Certified nursing aids—everyone likes free stuff, right? How about a free t-shirt? Celebrate National Nursing Assistants Week with Caregiverlist.  The Refer-a-Friend program provides an opportunity to get a caregiving job and their friend a chance to win a t-shirt!

Refer-a-Friend to a caregiving job will enter one for a chance to win a free t-shirt with additional prizes.  To honor the last day of National Nursing Assistants Week, Caregiverlist will give away 10 t-shirts to the Refer-a-Friend winners on Thursday, June 20th. Caregiverlist has weekly and monthly winners through the Refer-a-Friend program. Each week, Caregiverlist gives away a t-shirt and a monthly winner receives a $50 gift card.

C.N.A.’s and caregivers can stay active in the caregiving community with Caregiverlist.com. Stories share times of struggle and satisfaction.  C.N.A.’s and caregivers get involved by sharing their stories on Caregiverlist.  Those who post submissions inspire others who face physical, mental and emotional demands of caregiving. Read past stories that have been submitted by caregivers for motivation.

Caregivers, C.N.A.s and C.H.H.A.s looking for employment can apply for jobs online. Senior care companies hire on a weekly basis in all areas nationally. Those interested in a caregiving job can fill out an application online through Caregiverlist.

Florence Nightingale: Is She Still Relevant?

Caregiverlist's team celebrated Nurses’ Week recently, a week recognizing the field of nursing which culminated in the birthday of Florence Nightingale.

Every nurse and Certified Nursing Assistant (and almost everyone else in the world) has heard of Florence Nightingale, who established the Florence Nightingale School of Nursing & Midwifery at Kings College London, the first official nurses’ training program, in 1860. The oldest professional nursing school in the UK, it is still in operation today. She also acted as a consultant for the John Hopkins School of Nursing, one of the first nursing institutions in the United States, in 1889.

In honor of Ms. Nightingale and nurses everywhere, I decided to take a look at Notes on Nursing: What it is, and What it is Not, by Florence Nightingale — the first nursing handbook, published in 1898 and made available free online at Project Gutenberg as an ebook and for Kindle.

At a time when two in every five children in London died before their fifth birthday and the average life-expectancy was 47 years, the book was of vital importance and was the first of its kind ever written on the fundamentals of caring for the ill. It elevated the views on nurses and nursing.

If, then, every woman must at some time or other of her life, become a nurse, i.e., have charge of somebody's health, how immense and how valuable would be the produce of her united experience if every woman would think how to nurse.

I do not pretend to teach her how, I ask her to teach herself, and for this purpose I venture to give her some hints.

The table of contents shows the following topics for advice and recommendations:

  • ventilation and warming
  • 
health of houses
  • 
petty management (how things are done by others when you must be away)
  • 
noise

  • variety (environment)

  • taking food
  • 
what food?

  • bed and bedding
  • 
light

  • cleanliness of rooms and walls
  • 
cleanliness (personal)
  • 
chattering hopes and advices (the false assurances and recommendations of family and friends to the sick)

  • observation of the sick


Notes on Nursing proposed that “Of the sufferings of disease, disease not always the cause.” Pure air, pure water, light and ventilation, cleanliness and fresh bedding, all stand the test of time in their assistance with patient care and recovery. She was also one of the first to write about the power of positive thinking.

More interesting to me was the advice indicative of the Victorian age — and that no one before Ms. Nightingale had the temerity to suggest that environmental changes would affect the health and well-being of those in need of care.

She championed the call to abolish slop pails and chamber utensils without lids, sounded the alarm regarding the burning of the crinolines (referring to the large, flammable underskirts all women wore in the name of decency, which would often catch fire,) and the refusal to believe that the extent of a patient’s illness was “in God’s hands.”

Her holistic nursing approach, of course, extended to food served to the sick. Here again, some truths are universal, some selections read like curiosities. Food like beef tea (clear soup?), homemade bread — good. Eggs whipped with wine? Not so much.

Because of its historical importance and ready availability, I urge you to read it yourself. Then let us know in the comments: Is this best considered an interesting read, or do you feel, as Joan Quixley, then head of the Nightingale School of Nursing wrote in her introduction to the 1974 edition, "the book astonishes one with its relevance to modern attitudes and skills in nursing, whether this be practised at home by the 'ordinary woman', in hospital or in the community. The social, economic and professional differences of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries in no way hinder the young student or pupil from developing, if he or she is motivated to do so, its unchanged fundamentals by way of intelligent thought and practice."?

One thing is true, then as now — caregiving is a noble calling. If you are considering it as a career choice, or if you are looking to increase your skillset, visit our Caregiver Career Center to get your caregiver certification training, build a resume, or apply for a caregiver job.

Eli Lilly and Co. Study Results: 1 in 5 Patients Diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease Don't Have It

National Dementia Week this week sparks conversation about memory loss and the impact this is having on America's seniors.  The longer you live, the greater your chances for developing some form of memory loss.  The two go together.  But now a new survey by Eli Lilly and Company, released today, shows that not everyone who is diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease actually has this form of memory loss.

Eli Lilly did the survey as a way to help promote their imaging agent, called Amyvid, and to receive Medicare approval for reimbursement of this new product.  Amyvid received U.S. market approval last year and would assist in identifying the deposits of a protein called amyloid which is one of two telltale signs of Alzheimer's disease.  The imaging test is called PET, or positron emission tomography.

Performing an autopsy has been the only way to 100% for sure identify these plaques.  The thinking is that by properly diagnosing all Alzheimer's patients, Medicare may actually save money by properly treating everyone for the right type of memory loss.  Estimates are that 7.1 million people will have Alzheimer's disease by 2025.

Someday, there could also be the possibility for everyone to be tested for Alzheimer's disease at a certain age.  The Harvard School of Public Health found that two-thirds of adults would take a predictive Alzheimer's test.

With Angelina Jolie's New York Time's editorial last week, about her decision to proactively choose to have a double mastectomy because of testing positive for the BRCA1 mutation, being able to identify Alzheimer's disease accurately could lead to more preventive treatments.

Senior caregivers working with senior's with memory loss must have special training to understand all of the dynamics of the disease.  One of the biggest challenges of Alzheimer's disease is that it progresses at a different rate in each person.  However, because of the growth in the number of individuals living longer with memory loss, the demand for caregivers continues as senior care companies hire part-time and full-time caregivers each day.  Apply for a senior caregiving job near you or refer-a-friend and be entered to win prizes weekly on Caregiverlist.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo is a beautiful and serene sunset. We'd like to thank you for caring for our seniors. Remember more caregivers are needed, please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools. 

 

Caregiverlist Stress Relief Photo Sunset

"A professional is someone who can do his best work when he doesn’t feel like it."

Alistair Cook

Log in