New Year's Resolutions for Senior Caregivers

It’s about that time of the year. The time when we look at our lives and think “How can I make next year better than this one? Am I leading the life I want to lead?” Some people absolutely hate New Year’s resolutions. What better way to heap more stress on yourself than setting unrealistic goals?

What if we don’t call them New Year’s Resolutions? What if we refer to these ideas as hopeful plans to achieve goals that will help both caregiver and care recipient? Start them in January if you’d like, but they’ll be just as relevant in July. Bookmark or print this page and use it as a reminder that life is a balancing act and just as you give (care), you must also take.

Take Care of Yourself
This is the biggest challenge facing both family and senior caregivers. Senior care is exhausting at best, so there is little time to look after your own well being. Don’t make that mistake. You know how in an airplane emergency, you must place the oxygen mask over your own face before you can help those around you? It works the same way with your health. You are an athlete and senior care is your event. Make sure your body is in its best condition by exercising, eating right, and taking some quiet meditative time to regroup.

Take a Respite Break
You just can’t do it all yourself. Nor should you. If you are a family caregiver, consider hiring a professional caregiver to provide a few hours (or days) break for you. If money is tight and you have a community of givers nearby, programs like Lotsa Helping Hands were created to provide friends, family, and colleagues a place to come together and coordinate needed support through a group calendar. Volunteers can provide a meal, furnish transportation, or plan a visit. But most of all, they can give you a break.

Take Some Training
Whether you are a family caregiver looking to learn how to maintain a clean, safe, and healthy environment specifically geared toward seniors, or a companion caregiver who wants to begin a path to professional senior care, formal training is a great place to start. Online training (like the kind Caregiverlist offers) allows you to learn at your own pace, on your own schedule. If you are a seasoned caregiving professional, maybe it’s time to take that next step and study to become a C.N.A. — and very much in demand.

Take Advantage of Technology   
There are a host of programs and applications that can help with self- or elder-care. From exercise and nutrition, to crafting, to ideas for caregiver stress relief, every Friday, Caregiverlist’s own Paige Krzysko reviews all things Tech to help with your senior caregiving. Be sure to give her a read.

Well, that’s my last post for the year 2014 — thanks for reading. From everyone at Caregiverlist, have a happy, healthy, safe New Year and I’ll be back with senior care news, advice, opinions (and sometimes just some general nonsense) in 2015.

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