Brain Games in App Keep Brain Active and Prevent Dementia

One of the best ways to prevent the onset of dementia is to keep the mind active as we grow older. This can be accomplished in many ways, such as crossword puzzles, reading books on a regular basis or playing little brain games. The Peak - Brain Training app gives senior clients a series of games to play to sharpen their memory skills, improve mental agility and keep their brain active.

When users first download the app, they need to create a profile from a Facebook account or with an e-mail address. The app asks which areas they would like focus on from problem solving, memory, language and focus. Caregivers can help their senior clients pick categories, but there's no issue with selecting all four. 

Then, to establish a base point, users need to complete a series of intro exercises. The first exercise shows users a series of three or four tiles with numbers on them and asks them to tap them in order from lowest to highest. This exercise focuses on speed and accuracy. 

Another exercise presents a tiled board and shows spots where little mines are hidden. Senior clients need to remember where the mines are hidden because then it shows two dots and the goal is to connect the dots without hitting one of the squares with a hidden mine. This exercise focuses mainly on strengthening memory. 


As users move through the exercises, they app assesses their skills and gives them a ranking, from beginner or novice up to expert. As senior clients use the app over time, the app creates personalized workouts to improve their skill sets based on prior performance in the games. 

Senior caregivers can sit down with their senior clients a few times a week and take turns playing the games or simply cheer their senior clients on while they complete the exercises. For optimal brain exercise to help offset dementia, use the app about three times a week and pepper the day with other small brain activities, such as reading the newspaper or doing a crossword puzzle. 

The Peak - Brain Training app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Caregivers Can Experience Life with Dementia Using New App

When it comes to understanding dementia and Alzheimer's disease, we can read about the various symptoms and glean together an understanding from people we know who dealt with them. However, it can still be difficult to piece together the thought patterns of someone with dementia as they navigate through their daily life. A new app called "A Walk Through Dementia" aims to bridge the gap between those living with dementia and those on the outside by giving a glimpse into the thoughts of a person with dementia. 

The app focuses on creating a virtual reality experience for the user. Alzheimer's Research UK created the app after interviewing several people with dementia to understand how their symptoms affect their daily lives. The app features three different environments for the user to navigate through: at the supermarket, on the road and at home. 


The app uses Google Cardboard virtual reality to immerse the user in the experience. For this reason, the app is available exclusively for Android, but the app creators put together a set of YouTube videos to help people without Androids experience the app as well. 

Watching the YouTube videos, we see first-person the narrator walking down the street and encountering a decision point of which way to walk home. As the narrator walks, we hear her inner thoughts change from recognizing her surroundings to deciding to take an alleyway as a short cut. Then, we hear her realize it's not the right way home and increasing panic as she does not recognize her surroundings and cannot find her son. 

As the walk continues, we realize further difficulties in perception as the narrator comes across a puddle, but her mind cannot correctly identify it. To her, it looks more like a gaping hole in the middle of the sidewalk, and only her son's confirmation helps her recognize that it's just a bit of water. We hear her attempt to cover put he fact that she thought it was something else, but from first person it lends us the recognition that she truly could not tell the difference. 

This sort of first-person recognition will help caregivers better understand how senior clients with dementia experience the world around them. By having this app or these videos to watch, we can clearly see how to a person with dementia, a shallow puddle of water can look like a hole in the ground because of the brain's distortion of reality. 

If your senior client has dementia or Alzheimer's Disease, talk to them about their experiences with the world. It can be difficult, but letting them know that you will listen and support them through these situations can only help them feel more comfortable about opening up about their dementia.

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko


Learn to Cook for Caregivers With Video Recipe App

Looking at a recipe on a piece of paper and following the instructions to the best of your ability only to have the end result turn out nothing like it's supposed to can be frustrating. Sometimes learning to cook requires more than step by step printed instructions. Caregivers can learn how to cook new recipes by watching videos for each step using the Yummly app. 

When users first download the Yummly app, they are asked to enter some personal information such as age and who you most often cook for. Caregivers then pick their favorite types of cuisines. Options include Asian, Cajun & Creole, Greek, Mexican, etc. There's also a category for Kid-Friendly, in case there's a child you often cook for. 

The next section asks for information on specific allergies, such as dairy, gluten or soy, or diets, such as vegetarian, paleo or vegan. The next section breaks down foods the user dislikes, with options such as alcohol, bacon, beef, mayonnaise, etc. If you often cook for a senior client, it might be beneficial to complete this section with them so the recipes are tailored to their preferences. 

Users then rank their cooking skills as beginner, intermediate or advanced. Then caregivers are presented with an array of recipes that they can scroll between, either clicking Yum or skipping. This part gives the app an idea of actual recipes you might enjoy to further personalize your recommendations. In addition to personalized recommendations, users can also browse popular recipes in their area if they so wish. 



When caregivers scroll through the homepage and find a recipe they're interested in, they can click on it to see a snapshot including the number of ingredients, calories per serving and how long it takes to make. After that, they can scroll up to see the recipe itself and, if applicable, the accompanying video.

Not every recipe in the app has an accompanying video, but it's easy to distinguish which ones on the homepage have them because a play button appears over the image. The videos provide a good step by step overview of the recipes, as well as advice on how to properly apply cooking techniques and avoid pitfalls not fully described by printed recipes. 

Caregivers can rate the recipes from the app after cooking them to share their experience and how the recipe turned out. The Shopping List area of the app also provides a place for users to record what they need to buy, and it even integrates with Instacart to provide delivery of ingredients within an hour. 

The Yummly app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Home Remedies for Caregivers to Help Routine Ailments

Back pain, heartburn or sunburn might be somewhat minor on the scale of severity of health issues, but they can cause serious discomfort for caregivers or their senior clients on a regular basis. Try searching home remedies for the times when a minor issue plagues you, but it's not severe enough to need to visit the doctor using the Home Remedies app. 

When users first open the app, they must agree to a statement that the app is not intended to replace the opinion of a medical professional. Caregivers know that nothing replaces a visit to the doctor when it's necessary. This app can be used in instances of minor injury to quell pain, speed up healing or eliminate the underlying cause of a problem, 

The app design offers a clean and simple way to navigate around. The home screen shows all of the ailments with available home remedies to view. The list includes a range of problems, from bruises and dandruff to sore throat and common cold. When caregivers pick an ailment and click on it, the app brings them to a detail screen with all of the suggested home ailments. 


The number of suggested home remedies varies from one to almost 10 suggestions in some cases. For example, the sore throat home remedies list shows seven options. Most of the remedies include ingredients caregivers are likely to have lying around the house, or that are affordable and easy to pick up at the local drug store or grocery store. For the sore throat home remedies, ingredients include onion, honey, basil, cinnamon, tea or turmeric. 

When users navigate back to the home screen, they will find an icon in the top right corner that looks like a figure in a white coat. Caregivers can use this button to be taken out of the app and to the Home Remedies site where they will find the Ask a Question function. If caregivers have specific questions about a home remedy, they can use this form to send an e-mail and receive an answer back. Remember, this does not replace a doctor's opinion. If there's any indication that an ailment might be serious then you should visit a doctor or go to the emergency room, if warranted. 

The Home Remedies app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko


History App for Caregivers, Senior Clients to Share Past

A lot can change in a lifetime, especially for senior clients who were born before the personal computer, the civil rights movement and the World Wars. For senior caregivers and their clients who enjoy discussing and learning about history, The History Channel app offers content from the cable channel as well as an archive of event specific short videos. 

The History Channel on TV covers a vast amount of human history in different areas. Likewise, the app provides content ranging across the depths of human history, covering topics from American slavery and the civil rights movement to U.S. Presidents and the history of the U.S. States. 

When users first download the app, they have the option to log in using their cable provider to unlock all of the features, or to just browse without logging in. The benefit of logging in comes in being able to watch full episodes of The History Channel original series, and being able to stream Live TV directly to the device being used. 

Users can even mark shows they'd like to watch later and sync their Continue Watching and My Queue lists from the app to their TV. For senior caregivers who might like to watch this channel with their senior clients to share a piece of history, this feature could come in handy to bookmark clips they'd like to show their senior clients later. 

Even if users don't log in with a cable provider, they still have free access to the Topics area of the app. This section breaks down app content based on the event or topic it centers around. Topics include Ancient History, holidays such as Christmas and Thanksgiving, major wars such as the Cold War and the Vietnam War, and Women's History. 


Users can pick a topic and without leaving that page, quickly scroll through all of the videos in the category to pick one to watch. For a more in depth summary, they can click on a specific title to read a full description and find information on video length. Most of the videos range from two to four minutes long and offer similar insight from historians as the longer programs on the History Channel. 

For senior caregivers, sharing this app with their senior clients provides a unique way to learn more about their word view. For example, watching a video on the Vietnam War might prompt a senior client to share a story about a loved one who served in the military at that time. Or, watching videos on the Civil Rights Movement might cause senior clients to reflect on how society has changed within their lifetime. And, if senior clients already have particular events from history they like to learn about, this app provides an easy way to find more videos on the topic to continue further learning. 

The History Channel App is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko


Buy and Sell Second Hand Items for Caregivers in App

With low pay rates, caregiver budgets can be tight. Take that shirt you loved in the store only to bring it home and wear it twice before being doomed to the back of your closet and put it up for sale online instead of letting it gather dust. Using the letgo app, caregivers can make money off items they no longer use at home and search for gently used items at low prices. 

The letgo app functions as a neighborhood resale app. Users can list items for sale and pick up in their neighborhood, and then search listings in their area. When caregivers first download the app, they need to create an account by linking a Facebook or Google profile, or typing in their information manually.

Once caregivers create an account, they can browse through all available listings. The app breaks items for sale down into one of several categories such as: electronics; cars and motors; sports, leisure and games; home and garden; movies, books and music; fashion and accessories; baby and child; or other. 

The wide variety of items for sale offer caregivers plenty of options to purchase things they might need at a lower rate than in stores. For example, in the furniture category users can search through listings with furniture available secondhand but still in good condition. For example, this Ikea chair starts at $129 new, but caregivers could purchase it for $40 secondhand from this listing in the app. 


Caregivers can also see the zip code where the seller is located, so they can easily determine if the item would be in a place easy for them to get to and pick up. To sell an item of their own, caregivers can create a listing in a few short minutes. The app allows users to upload photos from their phones or take a new photo when creating a listing. 

Once a photo has been selected or taken, caregivers can either set a price or list it simply as negotiable. The description of the item will be pulled from the photograph you provide, and the location will match up with the location attached to your profile from the time of set up. Product listings become available within the app in 10 minutes. 

Once caregivers see something they'd like to purchase, they can chat privately within the app with the seller to arrange payment and a time to pick the item up. Caregivers can see a summary of all the items they've sold or bought under the person icon on the lower right corner of the screen. 

The letgo app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Celebrate Arbor Day and Get Outdoors with Park Finder App

Arbor Day is next Friday, April 29. While the natural first inclination as a way to celebrate Arbor Day might be to plant a tree in your yard, caregivers and their senior clients don't have to go through quite so much physical labor to appreciate nature. Using the Oh, Ranger! ParkFinder app, caregivers can search local parks to enjoy with their senior clients as a way to get some fresh air, or on their own for hiking, biking or running as a form of exercise. 

After users first open the app and authorize it to use their location, they then have the option to search for parks based strictly on location, or instead select Things to Do at the parks prior to searching. Options on the Things to Do list include birdwatching, picnicking, hiking, fishing, boating, etc. Once caregivers select specific activities and initiate the search, a list comes back of all the parks in the area that meet that criteria. 


The app displays parks in a list, starting with the one closest to the user's current location and moving farther away as the list continues. There's also a map feature which allows users to see all the results plotted out, in case they'd like to find a park that way instead. 

Once users identify a park they might like to visit, they can click on it for a one or two paragraph description of the park in addition to a list of all the Things to Do there. The description tries to provide all pertinent information, such as the type of equipment at the park and the layout. One even shares information on whether the park is considered ADA accessible, which is helpful for senior caregivers whose clients might be in wheelchairs. 

The app only offers photos uploaded by other users who visited the park previously, so some of the parks have no photos at all. Caregivers can also read reviews left by other visitors to get an idea of what to expect when they visit, and leave their own review after they spend time in the park themselves. 

The last part of the park profile provides contact information for the park, including the organization who owns it (i.e. Chicago Park District) and the main phone number. Caregivers can check in when they visit the park to keep track of where they've been and save their favorite parks to the My Parks area of the app. 

Senior caregivers might find that spending just half an hour at a park with their senior client on the way home from an errand provides a nice way to stop and connect with nature. Running or biking outdoors at a park also offers a change of pace from regular gym equipment and some nice local greenery for added views. 

The Oh, Ranger! Park Finder app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Alarm App Gives Caregivers Easier Wake Up Options

Waking up can be hard to do, especially if sleeping through the night proves to be difficult. With the MyAlarmClock App, senior caregivers can set specific alarms for the morning and use sleep timers to help them fall asleep at night. 

Every part of the alarm clock in the MyAlarmClock app can be customized to meet the needs of the user. The app offers several different clock display options, ranging from digital displays in several colors to a mock antique clock face. 


To set an alarm, caregivers can go to the Alarm List and enter the time they would like to wake up. The Repeat option allows users to select which day(s) of the week they would like the alarm to go off. If caregivers see one client only on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, they can set a specific, repeating alarm just for those days. 

The alarm has a few different options for sounds. Users can choose between various in-app noises, such as Bells, Mellow or Electro, for the alarm noise. Or, they can elect to play music from their iTunes by picking a specific song or shuffling through the entire library. 

Caregivers should take care to ensure the volume level is where they'd like it on this screen. Users also have the option to have the noise fade in for a less jarring wake up. When the alarm goes off in the morning, caregivers can tap their hand over their phone to activate the "Snooze" button aspect. Or, they can set the snooze settings ahead of time to automatically have the alarm play for 30 seconds and then snooze for a set amount of time, i.e. five minutes. 

The Sleep Timer area of the app offers assistance to fall asleep at night. Users can select either White Noise or songs from their iTunes library to listen to as they drift off. The timer allows caregivers to set exactly how long the noise should play as they fall asleep. 

Other app functions include a flashlight that can be activated by double tapping on the screen and a weather area. The weather summary automatically shows in the upper left corner of the home screen, but users can also click on it for a more detailed view. This way, caregivers can know how to dress for the day before even leaving bed. 

The My Alarm Clock app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko


Save Money and Reward Yourself in Tipping App

Too tired to tie the laces on your shoes and go to the gym? Easier to grab coffee from a shop than to make it at home? Trying to break a bad habit? Using the Tip Yourself app, caregivers can identify acts they'd like to be rewarded for and give themselves tips for completing those acts. 

The tips come directly from the caregiver's bank account and are deposited into the "Tip Jar" within the app. For caregivers, maintaining a regular savings account might be challenging due to tight budgets, so the "Tip Jar" makes for an easy way to stash some extra cash away for a fun fund or a rainy day. Plus, it helps motivate users to break bad habits or form new good habits. 

When users first set up the app, they need to create a profile by either importing data from Facebook or filling in the fields manually. Then, users can link their bank account to the app by signing in with their bank's online log in and entering a verification code. This enables users to move funds back and forth from their account to their "Tip Jar." Funds can be withdrawn from the "Tip Jar" at any point and at no fee to the user. 

To create a tip, users simply need to go through two basic screens. The first asks for the tip amount, ranging from $2.00 to $10.00 or another amount specified by the user. One way caregivers might decide how much to tip lies in saving money on purchases. For example, if a caregiver decides to make a sandwich at home instead of getting food from a restaurant, they might save $5.00. That $5.00 could be designated as the self tip amount. 

Another place caregivers might find tip amounts is at the grocery store. If you buy a box of cereal on sale for $2.00 off and purchase that instead of a full priced brand, then reward yourself by putting that amount in your "Tip Jar." Two dollars may not seem like much, but those small amounts will add up over time. 


The second screen asks users to designate why they are giving themselves tips. Suggested reasons are listed at the bottom of the screen, but caregivers also have the option to type in their own reason. Specifically, if users are trying to break a bad habit such as smoking or establish a new habit such as going to the gym, this would be an ideal place to keep track of that. The lock or unlock button at the bottom establishes if the post will be public or private. 

For inspiration and to see what other users are giving themselves tips for, caregivers can look through an activity feed on the left side of the home screen. The statistics area of the app provides information on total tips this month, highest tip amount, average tip amount, etc. Caregivers can easily view the current balance of their "Tip Jar" on this screen or by clicking on an icon at the bottom of the app. 

The Tip Yourself app is available for Apple platforms.  

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko


Remember to Pack Everything for a Trip with List App

Nothing takes away the excitement of traveling like realizing that you planned to go for a nice swim but your swimsuit didn't make it into your suitcase before you left. Senior caregivers who help clients pack for a trip in particular have a lot to remember from medications to extra items for comfort such as blankets and pillows. If you or your senior client are planning a trip home for Easter this weekend or taking your own spring break, use the PackPoint app to plan and pack everything you'll need for a stress free trip. 

When users first open the app, it asks for pertinent details about their trip such as destination, date leaving, number of nights you'll be gone and if the trip is for business or leisure. The next screen asks users to select specific activities they might do during their trip, such as gym, camping or fancy dinner. 


For each activity selected, the app generates a pre-existing list of items users could want to use while they do it. For example, the swimming list adds a pool swimsuit, swimsuit coverup, goggles and sandals to the packing list. In addition to the specialty categories, the app generates a list of Essentials and Toiletries categories as part of the overall packing list too. 

Once caregivers pack an item on the list, they can click the circle next to the item and a check mark will appear inside of it. The item also turns grey and shifts to the bottom of the list for an easy visual on what's left to pack. Users also have the option to type additional items into any of the lists. For items such as socks or underwear that need to be refreshed on a daily basis, the app also places a number on the packing list that corresponds with the number of nights you will be traveling. 

The app also offers the ability to sync with Evernote, a notes and to-do list app. If caregivers already use that app, syncing the two together will make keeping track of overall tasks easier. Particularly if you're preparing a senior client for a trip, make sure to cover all bases from a medical perspective and a comfort perspective. Talk to their doctor and pack all necessary medications as well as any medical supplies needed for their regular routine. Additionally, pack outfits that incorporate a lot of layers for unpredictable temperatures and run through their daily routine in your head to pinpoint any other important items they might need. 

The PackPoint app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko


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