Hawaii Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

Hawaii is inarguably one of the most beautiful states in the nation and consistently makes “Best States for Retirement” lists. And why not? Not only is Hawaii lush, tropical, impossibly lovely (the very air smells of sea and flowers), but the cost of living (outside Honolulu) is 33.4% above the U.S. average. Icing on the cake? Social Security benefits and most other pension payouts are exempt from state income taxes.

But doesn’t Hawaii have the most expensive nursing homes in the U.S.? Not quite. Alaska takes the title of state with costliest nursing homes, with Hawaii coming in second, according to the Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Index. Hawaii has an average room cost of $355.50 (based on both private and semi-private rooms) to Alaska’s nursing home cost of $573.90.


Here’s a snapshot of Hawaii nursing home data:

Total Number of Nursing Homes: 50
Average Single Price: $397
Average Double Price: $314
Average Rating: 2.6

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 3
4-Star: 17
3-Star: 13
2-Star: 4
1-Star: 13

Which Hawaii nursing home has the highest Caregiverlist® rating? The Hawaii nursing home with the highest Caregiverlist® rating is privately-owned Island Nursing Home in Honolulu, Hawaii, which scores 4.8 out of 5 stars. The nursing home's semi-private room (they do not offer private rooms) costs $252.00 per day, which is significantly less than the state's average double rate of $314.

Senior care costs, especially the costs incurred by long-term nursing home stay, is something most people don’t think about until it’s too late, usually after the Medicare-paid first 100 days of post-hospital rehabilitation. But cost is not the only factor in choosing long-term care for our families or ourselves; seniors should review the ratings and costs of nursing homes in their area and then visit the nursing homes which meet their budget constraints.

A good place for families to begin anticipating future costs is by talking to a professional and coming up with a financial action plan. Caregiverlist can provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in Hawaii and help you learn about the costs for senior care. Seniors and their family caregivers can also research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.

Nevada Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

When I think of Nevada, I think of Las Vegas. But there’s a lot more to the state than gambling. Nevada’s aging population is one of the fastest growing in the nation. Currently, about 13% of the state’s population is over age 65. Growth in the oldest segment (85+) has increased by 78% over the last ten years, according to a report published by the Nevada Commission on Aging. And while senior prefer to age in place, many of those seniors will find themselves in need of care in a nursing home setting. only 4.1% of persons aged 65 and older live in institutional settings, but that number increases with age.

How much do nursing homes in Nevada cost? According to Caregiverlist’s updated national nursing home cost database, the daily room rate of a nursing home in Nevada is $216.21 (the state average of single and shared rooms,) or $78,917 per year. Nevada nursing homes carry average star rating of 2.7 out of 5.

Senior care planning includes understanding costs of nursing homes, along with their overall ratings. The sad truth is that the general consumer has no idea how much nursing home care costs in their area, and usually doesn’t learn of those costs until long-term care is needed.—like after the first 100 days of Medicare-covered care. Caregiverlist updates our nursing home cost database so seniors and their families can get an idea of long-term care costs in their area.

Below is a snapshot of Nevada nursing home costs and ratings:
Total Number of Nursing Homes: 53
Average Single Price: $229.79
Average Double Price: $202.63
Average Rating: 2.7

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 1
4-Star: 14
3-Star: 28
2-Star: 9
1-Star: 1

Which is Nevada’s highest rated nursing home? The only Nevada nursing home with a 5-Star Caregiverlist Nursing Home Rating is South Lyon Medical Center in Yerington, Nevada. It receives a perfect 5 out of 5 stars in its overall Medicare star rating and its certified nursing aide hours per resident per day.

Many seniors and their families will prefer to stay at home and hire an in-home professional senior caregiver. The median hourly rate for a home health aide or CNA in Nevada is $22 per hour, but can increase or decrease depending on the location and level of care required. A quality home care agency provides all necessary liability and worker's compensation insurance protections and payroll taxes as required by law.

When should families begin anticipating for future long-term care costs? A good place to start is consulting with a professional who can come up with a financial action plan, something that includes an assessment of your family’s assets and future spending needs. Caregiverlist can provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in Nevada and help you learn about the costs for senior care. Seniors and their family caregivers can also research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.

California AB 1217, Assembly Bill 1217 Caregiver Training Requirements

The Federal Trade Commission tracks fraud complaints and found that the number of complaints involving people age 60 or older doubled from year 2010 to year 2014. The complexity of managing your savings and financial affairs as you age has only increased with the new digital tools that often must be learned in order to manage your money.

California's Assembly Bill 1217, also referred to as "AB 1217" addresses this need to assist seniors to remain safe while aging-in-place in their homes. The bill's requirements resulted in the new Home Care Services Consumer Protection Act.

What does AB1217 require?

California senior caregivers must now meet a minimum caregiver training requirement of 5 hours before caring for a client in their home, followed by 5 hours of annual training in basic caregiving core competency skills. In addition, caregivers must be registered on the state's Home Care Aide Registry which includes a criminal background check process. These are the big new requirements from the bill as most of the others items were already being practiced by quality caregivers and companies.

Senior care companies must meet licensing requirements which are for the most part just basic business requirements and most California agencies already were meeting these standards. The new requirements should assist in keeping away the bad eggs who will always troll upon the elder care industry. It will also make it an easier process for senior care companies to know they are hiring legitimate caregivers who are the person they say they are and can meet the minimum caregiving skills before being hired.

Senior care companies must train their caregivers (many companies train caregivers via the Caregiverlist Training Portal).

For some light reading (just kidding), here is the exact text of California Assembly Bill 1217.

AB 1217 Text

SECTION 1.

Chapter 13 (commencing with Section 1796.10) is added to Division 2 of the Health and Safety Code, to read:

CHAPTER  13. Home Care Services
Article  1. General Provisions
1796.10

This chapter shall be known, and may be cited, as the Home Care Services Consumer Protection Act.

1796.11.

The State Department of Social Services shall administer and enforce this chapter.

1796.12.

For purposes of this chapter, the following definitions shall apply:

(a) “Affiliated home care aide” means an individual, 18 years of age or older, who is employed by a home care organization to provide home care services to a client and is listed on the home care aide registry.

(b) “Child” or “children” means an individual or individuals under 18 years of age.

(c) “Client” means an individual who receives home care services from a registered home care aide.

(d) “Department” means the State Department of Social Services.

(e) “Director” means the Director of Social Services.

(f) “Family member” means any spouse, by marriage or otherwise, child or stepchild, by natural birth or by adoption, parent, brother, sister, half-brother, half-sister, parent-in-law, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, nephew, niece, aunt, uncle, first cousin, or any person denoted by the prefix “grand” or “great,” or the spouse of any of these persons, even if the marriage has been terminated by death or dissolution.

(g) “Home care aide applicant” means an individual, 18 years of age or older, who is requesting to become an registered home care aide and the department has received and is processing the individual’s complete home care aide application and fees.

(h) “Home care aide application” means the official form, designated by the department, to request to become a registered home care aide.

(i) “Home care aide registry” means a department-established and department-maintained Internet Web site of registered home care aides and home care aide applicants, which includes all of the following: the individual’s name, registration number, registration status, registration expiration date, and, if applicable, the home care organization to which the affiliated home care aide or affiliated home care aide applicant is associated.

(j) “Home care organization” means an individual, 18 years of age or older, firm, partnership, corporation, limited liability company, joint venture, association, or other entity that arranges for home care services by an affiliated home care aide to a client, and is licensed pursuant to this chapter.

(k) “Home care organization application” means the official form, designated by the department, to request to become a licensed home care organization.

(l) “Home care organization licensee” means an individual, 18 years of age or older, firm, partnership, corporation, limited liability company, joint venture, association, or other entity having the authority and responsibility for the operation of a licensed home care organization.

(m) “Home care services” means nonmedical services and assistance provided by a registered home care aide to a client who, because of advanced age or physical or mental disability, cannot perform these services. These services enable the client to remain in his or her residence and include, but are not limited to, assistance with the following: bathing, dressing, feeding, exercising, personal hygiene and grooming, transferring, ambulating, positioning, toileting and incontinence care, assisting with medication that the client self-administers, housekeeping, meal planning and preparation, laundry, transportation, correspondence, making telephone calls, shopping for personal care items or groceries, and companionship. This subdivision shall not authorize a registered home care aide to assist with medication that the client self-administers that would otherwise require administration or oversight by a licensed health care professional.

(n) “Registered home care aide” means an affiliated home care aide or independent home care aide, 18 years of age or older, who is listed on the home care aide registry.

(o) “Independent home care aide” means an individual, 18 years of age or older, who is not employed by a home care organization, but who is listed on the home care aide registry and is providing home care services through a direct agreement with a client.

Article  2. Registry and Exemptions
1796.14.

(a) Individuals who are not employed by a home care organization but who provide home care services to a client may be listed on the home care aide registry.

(b) An affiliated home care aide shall be listed on the home care aide registry prior to providing home care services to a client.

(c) An individual providing home care services to a child is exempt from any requirement to be listed on the home care aide registry if the individual is one of the following:

(1) A family member of the child.

(2) A guardian of the child.

(3) A conservator of the child.

(4) A foster parent of the child, in a foster family home, as defined in paragraph (5) of subdivision (a) of Section 1502, or a certified family home, as defined in subdivision (d) of Section 1506.

(5) Nonrelative extended family member, as defined in Section 362.7 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(6) Providing home care services in a facility in which only Indian children who are eligible under the federal Indian Child Welfare Act (25 U.S.C. 1901 et seq.) are placed and is one of the following:

(A) An extended family member of the Indian child, as defined in Section 1903 of Title 25 of the United States Code.

(B) A foster home that is licensed, approved, or specified by the Indian child’s tribe pursuant to Section 1915 of Title 25 of the United States Code.

(7) Providing home care services as part of his or her job duties through one of the following entities:

(A) A home health agency licensed under Chapter 8 (commencing with Section 1725).

(B) A hospice licensed under Chapter 8.5 (commencing with Section 1745).

(C) A health facility licensed under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 1250).

(D) Any clinic licensed under Sections 1204 or 1204.1.

(E) A county providing in-home supportive services pursuant to Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, without regard to whether the county provides these services as a public authority or through a nonprofit consortium established pursuant to Section 12301.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(F) A home medical device retail facility licensed under Section 111656.

(G) An organization vendored or contracted through a regional center or the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500) of the Welfare and Institutions Code) and the California Early Intervention Services Act (Title 14 (commencing with Section 95000) of the Government Code) to provide services and supports for persons with developmental disabilities, as defined in Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, when funding for those services is provided through the State Department of Developmental Services and more than 50 percent of the recipients of the home care services provided by the organization are persons with developmental disabilities.

(H) A community care facility as licensed under Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500), a residential care facility for persons with special health care needs licensed under Chapter 3.01 (commencing with Section 1568.01), a residential care facility for the elderly licensed under Chapter 3.2 (commencing with Section 1569), or a child day care licensed under Chapter 3.4 (commencing with Section 1596.70).

(I) Any alcoholism or drug abuse recovery or treatment facility as defined by Section 11834.02.

(J) Any other entity providing services similar to those described in this paragraph, as determined by the director.

(8) Providing services authorized pursuant to Section 2731 of the Business and Professions Code

(d) (1) Home care aides shall not include individuals who are providing home care services as part of their job duties through one of the following entities:

(A) Services authorized to be provided by a licensed home health agency under Chapter 8 (commencing with Section 1725).

(B) Services authorized to be provided by a licensed hospice pursuant to Chapter 8.5 (commencing with Section 1745).

(C) Services authorized to be provided by a licensed health facility pursuant to Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 1250).

(D) In-home supportive services provided pursuant to Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(E) Services authorized to be provided by one of the following:

(i) A licensed residential care facility for the elderly pursuant to Chapter 3.2 (commencing with Section 1569).

(ii) A licensed community care facility pursuant to Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500).

(iii) A licensed residential care facility for persons with chronic life-threatening illness pursuant to Chapter 3.01 (commencing with Section 1568.01).

(iv) A licensed facility, pursuant to the California Child Day Care Act (Chapter 3.4 (commencing with Section 1596.70)), which includes day care centers under Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 1596.90) and family day care homes under to Chapter 3.6 (commencing with Section 1597.30).

(2) Home care aides shall not include individuals providing services authorized to be provided pursuant to Section 2731 of the Business and Professions Code.

1796.15.

This chapter shall not prohibit an individual from employing an individual not listed on the home care aide registry to provide home care services. The department shall have responsibility only for the maintenance of the home care aide registry regarding registered home care aides.

1796.16.

A registered home care aide may provide home care services to more than one child for a family, but may not provide home care services for a child or children from more than one family at the same time. This section shall not preclude a registered home care aide from providing home care services for a child or children of multiple families at different times. This chapter shall not override provisions of the California Child Day Care Act (Chapter 3.4 (commencing with Section 1596.70)), Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 1596.90), and Chapter 3.6 (commencing with Section 1597.30).

1796.17.

A home care organization shall not include the following:

(a) A home health agency licensed under Chapter 8 (commencing with Section 1725).

(b) A hospice licensed under Chapter 8.5 (commencing with Section 1745).

(c) A health facility licensed under Chapter 2 (commencing with Section 1250).

(d) A county providing in-home supportive services pursuant to Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, without regard to whether the county provides these services as a public authority or through a nonprofit consortium established pursuant to Section 12301.6 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(e) A home medical device retail facility licensed under Section 111656.

(f) An organization vendored or contracted through a regional center or the State Department of Developmental Services pursuant to the Lanterman Developmental Disabilities Services Act (Division 4.5 (commencing with Section 4500) of the Welfare and Institutions Code) and the California Early Intervention Services Act (Title 14 (commencing with Section 95000) of the Government Code) to provide services and supports for persons with developmental disabilities, as defined in Section 4512 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, when funding for those services is provided through the State Department of Developmental Services and more than 50 percent of the recipients of the home care services provided by the organization are persons with developmental disabilities.

(g) An employment agency, as defined in Section 1812.5095 of the Civil Code, that procures, offers, refers, provides, or attempts to provide an independent home care aide who provides home care services clients.

(h) A residential care facility for the elderly licensed under Chapter 3.2 (commencing with Section 1569).

(i) A community care facility licensed under Chapter 3 (commencing with Section 1500), or a residential care facility for persons with chronic life-threatening illness licensed under Chapter 3.01 (commencing with Section 1568.01).

(j) An person or organization performing activities that fall under the jurisdiction of a child day care facility licensed under Chapter 3.4 (commencing with Section 1596.70), a day care center licensed under Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 1596.60), or a family day care home licensed under Chapter 3.6 (commencing with Section 1597.30).

Article  3. Home Care Aide Applicants
1796.19.

(a) The department shall consider, but is not limited to, the following when determining whether to approve a registration application:

(1) Evidence satisfactory to the department of the ability of the independent home care aide applicant or the affiliated home care aide applicant to comply with this chapter and the rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter by the department.

(2) Evidence satisfactory to the department that the independent home care aide applicant or the affiliated home care aide applicant is of reputable and responsible character. The evidence shall include, but is not limited to, a review of the independent home care aide applicant’s or the affiliated home care aide applicant’s criminal offender record information pursuant to Section 1522.

(3) Disclosure of any revocation or other disciplinary action taken, or in the process of being taken, related to the care of individuals against the independent home care aide applicant or the affiliated home care aide applicant.

(4) A signed statement that the independent home care aide applicant or the affiliated home care aide applicant has read and understood this chapter and any rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter by the department.

(5) Any other information that may be required by the department for the proper administration and enforcement of this chapter.

(b) Failure of the home care aide applicant to cooperate with the department in the completion of the Home Care Aide application shall result in the withdrawal of the registration application. “Failure to cooperate” means that the information described in this chapter and by any rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter has not been provided, or has not been provided in the form requested by the department, or both.

Article  4. Registration
1796.21.

A registered home care aide shall be 18 years of age or older.

1796.22.

Any individual who has submitted an application and who possesses any one of the following identification cards may initiate a background examination to be a registered home care aide:

(a) A valid California driver’s license.

(b) A valid identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles.

(c) A valid Alien Registration Card.

(d) In the case of a person living in a state other than California, a valid numbered photo identification card issued by an agency of the state other than California.

1796.23.

(a) Each person initiating a background examination to be a registered home care aide shall submit his or her fingerprints to the Department of Justice by electronic transmission in a manner approved by the State Department of Social Services, unless exempt under subdivision (d). Each person initiating a background examination to be a registered home care aide shall also submit to the State Department of Social Services a signed declaration under penalty of perjury regarding any prior criminal convictions pursuant to Section 1522 and a completed home care aide application.

(b) A law enforcement agency or other local agency authorized to take fingerprints may charge a reasonable fee to offset the costs of fingerprinting for the purposes of this chapter.

(c) The Department of Justice shall use the fingerprints to search the state and Federal Bureau of Investigation criminal offender record information pursuant to Section 1522.

(d) A person who is a current licensee or employee in a facility licensed by the State Department of Social Services, a certified foster parent, a certified administrator, or a registered TrustLine provider need not submit fingerprints to the State Department of Social Services and may transfer his or her current criminal record clearance or exemption pursuant to paragraph (1) of subdivision (h) of Section 1522. The person shall instead submit to the State Department of Social Services, along with the person’s registration application, a copy of the person’s identification card described in Section 1796.22 and sign a declaration verifying the person’s identity.

1796.24.

(a) (1) The department shall establish a home care aide registry pursuant to this chapter and shall continuously update the registry information. Upon submission of the home care aid application and fingerprints or other identification documents pursuant to Section 1796.23, the department shall enter into the home care aide registry the person’s name, identification number, and an indicator that the person has submitted a home care aide application and fingerprints or identification documentation. This person shall be known as a “home care aide applicant.”

(2) A person shall not be entitled to apply to be a registered home care aide and shall have his or her registration application returned without the right to appeal if the person would not be eligible to obtain a license pursuant to Section 1558.1.

(b) (1) Before approving an individual for registration, the department shall check the individual’s criminal history pursuant to Section 1522. Upon completion of the searches of the state summary criminal offender record information and the records of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the applicant shall be issued a criminal record clearance or granted a criminal record exemption if grounds do not exist for denial pursuant to Section 1522. The department shall enter that finding in the person’s record in the home care aide registry and shall notify the person of the action. This person shall be known as an “independent home care aide” or an “affiliated home care aide.” If the applicant meets all of the conditions for registration, except receipt of the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s criminal offender record information search response, the department may issue a clearance if the applicant has signed and submitted a statement that he or she has never been convicted of a crime in the United States, other than a minor traffic violation. If, after approval, the department determines that the registrant has a criminal record, registration may be revoked pursuant to Section 1796.26.

(2) For purposes of compliance with this section, the department may permit an applicant to request the transfer of a current criminal record clearance or exemption for a licensed care facility issued by the department or a county with delegated licensing authority. A signed criminal record clearance or exemption transfer request shall be submitted to the department and shall include a copy of the person’s driver’s license or valid identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles, or a valid photo identification issued by another state or the United States government if the person is not a California resident. Upon request of the licensee, who shall enclose a self-addressed envelope for this purpose, the State Department of Social Services shall verify whether the individual has a clearance or exemption that can be transferred pursuant to the requirements of this chapter.

(3) The State Department of Social Services shall hold criminal record clearances and exemptions in its active files for a minimum of three years after the individual is no longer on the registry in order to facilitate a transfer request.

1796.25

(a) (1) If the department finds that the home care aide applicant or the registered home care aide has been convicted of a crime, other than a minor traffic violation, the department shall deny the home care aide application, or revoke the registered home care aide’s registration unless the director grants an exemption pursuant to subdivision (g) of Section 1522.

(2) If the department finds that the independent home care aide applicant, the independent home care aide, the affiliated home care aide applicant, or the affiliated home care aide has an arrest as described in subdivision (a) of Section 1522, the department may deny the registration application or registration renewal application, or revoke the registered home care aide’s registration, if the independent home care aide applicant, independent home care aide, affiliated home care aide applicant, or affiliated home care aide may pose a risk to the health and safety of any person who is or may become a client and the department complies with subdivision (e) of Section 1522.

(3) The department may deny the home care aide application or the renewal application of a registered home care aide if the department discovers that it had previously revoked a license or certificate of approval to be a certified family home, a certified administrator, or a registered TrustLine provider held by the home care aide applicant or registered home care aide, or that it had excluded the home care aide applicant or registered home care aide from a licensed facility.

(4) The department may deny the home care aide application or registered home care aide registration renewal application, for placement or retention upon the home care aide registry or revoke the registered home care aide’s registration if the department discovers that it had previously denied the home care aide applicant’s or registered home care aide’s application for a license from the department or certificate of approval to be a certified family home, a certified administrator, or a registered TrustLine provider.

(b) (1) If the department revokes or denies a home care aide application or registered home care aide’s renewal application pursuant to subdivision (a), the department shall advise the home care aide applicant or registered home care aide of the right to appeal. The home care aide applicant or registered home care aide shall have 15 days to appeal the denial or revocation.

(2) Upon receipt by the department of the appeal, the appeal shall be set for hearing. The hearing shall be conducted in accordance with Section 1551.

(c) If the home care aide application or registered home care aide renewal application has been denied, the home care aide applicant or registered home care aide shall not reapply until he or she meets the timeframe set forth by the department in regulation, not to exceed one year.

1796.26.

(a) (1) The department may revoke or deny a registered home care aide’s registration or request for registration renewal if the registered home care aide does any of the following:

(A) Procures or attempts to procure his or her registered home care aide registration or renewal by fraud or misrepresentation.

(B) Knowingly makes or gives any false statement or information in conjunction with the registered home care aide application or renewal application.

(C) Has a criminal conviction, unless an exemption is granted pursuant to Section 1522.

(D) Engages or has engaged in an incident of abuse or neglect or other conduct that poses a threat to the health and safety of any person who is or may become a client.

(E) Violates this chapter or of the rules or regulations promulgated under this chapter.

(F) Aids, abets, or permits the violation of this chapter or of the rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter.

(G) Engages or has engaged in conduct which is inimical to the health, morals, welfare, or safety of the people of the state or an individual receiving or seeking to receive home care services.

(H) Engages or has engaged in acts of financial malfeasance concerning a client, including, but not limited to, improper use or embezzlement of client moneys and property or fraudulent appropriation for personal gain of client moneys and property, or willful or negligent failure to provide services.

(2) An individual whose registered home care aide registration has been revoked shall not reapply until he or she meets the timeframe as set forth in Section 1558.1.

(3) An individual whose registered home care aide criminal record exemption has been denied shall not reapply for two years from the date of the exemption denial.

(4) The hearing to revoke or deny the registered home care aide registration or registration renewal request shall be conducted in accordance with Section 1551.

(b) (1) The registered home care aide’s registration shall be considered forfeited under the following conditions:

(A) The registered home care aide has had a license or certificate of approval revoked, suspended, or denied as authorized under Section 1534, 1550, 1568.082, 1569.50, or 1596.885.

(B) The registered home care aide has been denied employment, residence, or presence in a facility or client’s home based on action resulting from an administrative hearing pursuant to Section 1558, 1568.092, 1569.58, or 1596.8897.

(C) The registered home care aide fails to maintain a current mailing address with the department.

(D) The registered home care aide’s registration is not renewed.

(E) The registered home care aide surrenders his or her registration to the department.

(F) The registered home care aide dies.

(2) An individual whose registered home care aide registration has been forfeited shall not reapply until he or she meets the timeframe set forth by the department in Section 1558.1.

(c) A registered home care aide’s registration shall not be transferred or sold to another individual or entity.

1796.28.

(a) The Department of Justice shall maintain and continually update pertinent criminal offender record information of registered home care aides and shall inform the department of subsequent reports received pursuant to Section 11105.2 of the Penal Code. The department shall continually update the home care aide registry pursuant to the actions required in this chapter.

(1) Registered home care aides and home care aide applicants shall maintain a current mailing address with the department.

(2) Registered home care aides and home care aide applicants shall inform the department of any new mailing address in writing within 10 days of a change in address.

(b) Notwithstanding any other law, including Part 3 (commencing with Section 900) of Division 3.6 of Title 1 of the Government Code, state officers or employees shall not be liable for any damages caused by their conduct pursuant to this chapter except for intentional acts or gross negligence.

1796.29.

The department shall do both of the following in the administration of the home care aide registry:

(a) Establish and maintain on the department’s Internet Web site the registry of registered home care aides and home care aide applicants.

(1) To expedite the ability of a consumer to search and locate a registered home care aide or home care aide applicant, the Internet Web site shall enable consumers to look up the registration status by providing the registered home care aide’s or home care aide applicant’s name, registration number, registration status, and registration expiration date.

(2) The Internet Web site shall not provide any additional, individually identifiable information about a registered home care aide or home care aide applicant. The department may request and may maintain additional information for registered home care aides or home care aide applicants, as necessary for the administration of this chapter, which shall not be publicly available on the home care aide registry.

(b) Update the home care registry upon receiving notification from a home care organization that an affiliated home care aide is no longer employed by the home care organization.

Article  5. Renewal
1796.31.

(a) To remain on the home care aide registry, a registered home care aide shall renew his or her registration every two years.

(1) A registered home care aide’s registration shall expire every two years, on the anniversary date of the initial registration date. If the registration is not renewed on or prior to its expiration date, the registration shall be forfeited pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 1796.26.

(2) To renew a registration, the registered home care aide shall, on or before the registration expiration date, request renewal by submitting to the department the registration renewal application form and paying the registration renewal application fee in the amount determined by the department.

(b) Renewal of a registered home care aide’s registration is conditioned on compliance with all of the following:

(1) Submitting a complete registration renewal application form and payment of fees, both of which shall be postmarked on or before the expiration of the registration.

(2) Continuing to satisfy the requirements set forth in this chapter.

(3) Cooperating with the department in the completion of the renewal process. Failure of the registered home care aide to cooperate shall result in the withdrawal of the registration renewal application by the department. For purposes of this section, a failure to cooperate means that the information described in this chapter and in any rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter has not been provided, or has not been provided in the form requested by the department, or both.

(c) A revoked registered home care aide’s registration is subject to expiration as provided for in this section. If reinstatement of the registered home care aide’s registration is approved by the department, the individual, as a condition precedent to reinstatement, shall pay a fee in an amount equal to the renewal fee accrued at the time of its revocation.

Article  6. Licensure of Home Care Organizations
1796.33.

Any individual who has submitted an application and who possesses any one of the following identification cards may initiate a background examination to be a licensed home care organization:

(a) A valid California driver’s license.

(b) A valid identification card issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles.

(c) A valid Alien Registration Card.

(d) In the case of a person living in a state other than California, a valid numbered photo identification card issued by an agency of the state other than California.

1796.34.

In order to obtain a home care organization license, the following individual or individuals shall consent to the background examination described in Section 1796.23:

(a) The owner or owners of the home care organization, if the owners are individuals.

(b) If the owner of a home care organization is a corporation, limited liability company, joint venture, association, or other entity, an individual having a 10-percent or greater interest in that entity.

1796.35.

(a) A person or a private or public organization, with the exception of a county providing in-home supportive services pursuant to Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code, and the exceptions provided for in subdivision (b), shall not do any of the following, unless it is licensed under this chapter:

(1) Represent himself, herself or itself to be a home care organization by name, advertising, soliciting, or any other presentments to the public, or in the context of services within the scope of this chapter, imply that he, she, or it is licensed to provide those services or to make any reference to employee bonding in relation to those services.

(2) Use the terms “home care organization,” “home care,” “in-home care,” or any combination of those terms, within its name.

(b) This section does not apply to either of the following:

(1) A county providing in-home supportive services pursuant to Article 7 (commencing with Section 12300) of Chapter 3 of Part 3 of Division 9 of the Welfare and Institutions Code.

(2) An employment agency, as defined in Section 1812.5095 of the Civil Code, that procures, offers, refers, provides, or attempts to provide an affiliated home care aide who provides home care to clients.

1796.36.

(a) Subject to the exceptions set forth in Section 1796.17, an individual, partnership, corporation, limited liability company, joint venture, association, or other entity shall not arrange for the provision of home care services by a registered home care aide to a client in this state before obtaining a license pursuant to this chapter. This shall be deemed “unlicensed home care services.”

(b) Upon discovering an individual or entity is in violation of subdivision (a), the department shall send a written notice of noncompliance to the individual or entity and assess a civil penalty of nine hundred dollars ($900) per day for each calendar day of each violation.

(c) Upon discovering that an individual or entity is in violation of subdivision (a), the department shall send a copy of the written notice of noncompliance to the individual or entity and to the Attorney General or appropriate district attorney or city attorney.

(d) Upon receiving this notice, the Attorney General, district attorney, or city attorney may do any or all of the following:

(1) Issue a cease and desist order, which shall remain in effect until the individual or entity has obtained a license pursuant to this chapter. If the individual or entity fails to comply with the cease and desist order within 20 calendar days, the Attorney General, district attorney, or city attorney may apply for an injunction.

(2) Impose the civil penalty described in subdivision (b).

(3) Bring an action against the individual or entity under Chapter 5 (commencing with Section 17200) of Part 2 of Division 7 of the Business and Professions Code.

1796.37.

(a) A home care organization that has its principal place of business in another state, in addition to the other requirements of this chapter, before arranging for home care services provided by an affiliated home care aide to a client in the state, shall comply with all of the following:

(1) Have an office in California.

(2) Maintain all pertinent records of the operation in California at the California office. All records shall be available to review, copy, audit, and inspect by the licensing agency.

(b) If the home care organization is a foreign corporation, foreign limited liability company, foreign limited partnership, foreign association, or a foreign limited liability partnership, as defined in Sections 170, 171, 171.03, 171.05, and 16101 of the Corporations Code, before arranging for home care services provided by an affiliated home care aide to a client in the state, the home care organization shall have an office in California and shall comply with both of the following:

(1) Register with the Secretary of State to conduct intrastate business in California.

(2) Maintain all pertinent records of the operation in California at the California office. All records shall be available to review, copy, audit, and inspect by the licensing agency.

1796.38.

The department may issue a home care organization license to an individual or other entity that satisfies all of the requirements set forth in this chapter, including all of the following:

(a) Files a home care organization application, including the fees required pursuant to Section 1796.49.

(b) Submits proof of general and professional liability insurance in the amount of at least one million dollars ($1,000,000) per occurrence and three million dollars ($3,000,000) in the aggregate.

(c) Submits proof of a valid workers’ compensation policy covering its affiliated home care aides. The proof shall consist of the policy number, the effective and expiration dates of the policy, and the name and address of the policy carrier.

(d) Provides the department, upon request, with a complete list of its affiliated home care aides, and proof that each satisfies the requirements of Section 1796.43.

(e) The owner or owners of the home care organization pass a background examination, as required pursuant to Section 1796.34.

(f) The applicant does not have any outstanding fees or civil penalties due to the department.

1796.39.

(a) A home care organization licensee shall renew the home care organization license every two years.

(b) Renewal shall be conditioned upon the licensee doing both of the following:

(1) Submitting a complete home care organization licensee renewal application form and payment of fees, both of which shall be postmarked on or before the expiration of the license.

(2) Continuing to satisfy the requirements set forth in this chapter, and cooperating with the department in the completion of the home care organization licenses renewal process.

(c) Failure of the home care organization licensee to cooperate may result in the withdrawal of the home care organization license renewal application. “Failure to cooperate” means that the information described in this chapter and in any rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter has not been provided, or not provided in the form requested by the department, or both.

Article  7. Home Care Organization Operating Requirements
1796.41.

A home care organization licensee shall do all of the following:

(a) Post its license and business hours in its place of business in a conspicuous location, visible both to clients and affiliated home care aides.

(b) Maintain and abide by a valid workers’ compensation policy covering its affiliated home care aides.

(c) Maintain and abide by an employee dishonesty bond, including third-party coverage, with a minimum limit of ten thousand dollars ($10,000).

(d) Report any suspected or known adult abuse as required by Section 15630 of the Welfare and Institutions Code and suspected or known child abuse as required by Sections 11164 to 11174.3, inclusive, of the Penal Code. A copy of each suspected abuse report shall be maintained and available for review by the department during normal business hours.

1796.42.

(a) Home care organizations that employ affiliated home care aides shall ensure the affiliated home care aides are cleared on the home care aide registry before placing the individual in direct contact with clients. In addition, the home care organization shall do all of the following:

(1) Ensure any staff person, volunteer, or employee of a home care organization who has contact with clients, prospective clients, or confidential client information that may pose a risk to the clients’ health and safety has met the requirements of Section 1796.23 before being hired.

(2) Require home care aides to demonstrate that they are free of active tuberculosis disease, pursuant to Section 1796.45.

(3) Immediately notify the department when the home care organization no longer employs an individual as an affiliated home care aide.

(b) This section shall not prevent a licensee from requiring a criminal record clearance of any individual exempt from the requirements of this section, provided that the individual has client contact.

Article  8. Affiliated Home Care Aides
1796.44.

(a) A home care organization licensee shall ensure that prior to providing home care services, an affiliated home care aide shall complete the training requirements specified in this section.

(b) An affiliated home care aide shall complete a minimum of five hours of entry-level training prior to presence with a client, as follows:

(1) Two hours of orientation training regarding his or her role as caregiver and the applicable terms of employment.

(2) Three hours of safety training, including basic safety precautions, emergency procedures, and infection control.

(c) In addition to the requirements in subdivision (b), an affiliated home care aide shall complete a minimum of five hours of annual training. The annual training shall relate to core competencies and be population specific, which shall include, but not be limited to, the following areas:

(1) Clients’ rights and safety.

(2) How to provide for and respond to a client’s daily living needs.

(3) How to report, prevent, and detect abuse and neglect.

(4) How to assist a client with personal hygiene and other home care services.

(5) If transportation services are provided, how to safely transport a client.

(d) The entry-level training and annual training on department-approved job-related topics described in subdivisions (b) and (c) may be completed through an online training program.

1796.45.

(a) An individual hired to be an affiliated home care aide on or after January 1, 2015, shall be submitted to an examination 90 days prior to employment or within seven days after employment to determine that the individual is free of active tuberculosis disease.

(b) For purposes of this section, “examination” means a test for tuberculosis infection that is recommended by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and that is licensed by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and, if that test is positive, an X-ray of the lungs. The aide shall not work as an affiliated home care aide unless he or she obtains documentation from a licensed medical professional that there is no risk of spreading the disease.

(c) An affiliated home care aide whose employment with a home care organization began before January 1, 2015, shall submit to the examination described in subdivision (a) before July 1, 2015.

(d) After submitting to an examination, an affiliated home care aide whose test for tuberculosis infection is negative shall be required to undergo an examination.

at least once every two years. Once an affiliated home care aide has a documented positive test for tuberculosis infection that has been followed by an X-ray, the examination is no longer required.

(e) After the examination, an affiliated home care aide shall submit, and the home care organization shall keep on file, a certificate from the examining practitioner showing that the affiliated home care aide was examined and found free from active tuberculosis disease.

(f) The examination is a condition of initial and continuing employment with the home care organization. The affiliated home care aide shall pay the cost of the examination.

(g) An affiliated home care aide who transfers employment from one home care organization to another shall be deemed to meet the requirements of subdivision (a) or (c) if the affiliated home care aide can produce a certificate showing that he or she submitted to the examination within the past two years and was found to be free of active tuberculosis disease, or if it is verified by the home care organization previously employing him or her that it has a certificate on file that contains that showing.

Article  9. Revenues
1796.47.

(a) (1) Administration of this program shall be fully supported by fees and not civil penalties. Initial costs to implement this chapter may be provided through a General Fund loan that is to be repaid in accordance with a schedule provided by the Department of Finance. The department shall assess fees for home care organization licensure, and home care aide registration related to activities authorized by this chapter. The department may adjust fees as necessary to fully support the administration of this chapter. Except for General Fund moneys that are otherwise transferred or appropriated for the initial costs of administering this chapter, or penalties collected pursuant to this chapter that are appropriated by the Legislature for the purposes of this chapter, no General Fund moneys shall be used for any purpose under this chapter.

(2) A portion of moneys collected in the administration of this chapter, as designated by the department, may be used for community outreach consistent with this chapter.

(b) The Home Care Fund is hereby created within the State Treasury for the purpose of this chapter. All licensure and registration fees authorized by this chapter shall be deposited into the Home Care Fund. Moneys in this fund shall, upon appropriation by the Legislature, be made available to the department for purposes of administering this chapter.

1796.48.

(a) The department may charge an application and renewal fee to become a registered home care aide and to renew a registered home care aide’s registration.

(b) The maximum fee shall not exceed the total actual costs, which include, but are not limited to, of all of the following:

(1) The searches for criminal offender records performed by the Department of Justice. The cost to check the criminal offender records shall not subsidize the cost to check the criminal history of other persons by the department who are not charged a fee by the Department of Justice.

(2) The cost incurred by the Department of Justice for the searches of the records of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

(3) The cost to the department to process the applications and maintain the home care aide registry and perform the duties required by this chapter and any rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter.

(c) The fees collected shall be deposited into the Home Care Fund pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 1796.47.

1796.49.

(a) A home care organization licensee shall pay the following fees:

(1) A 24-month initial license fee, as prescribed by the department, for a new home care organization licensee not currently licensed to provide home care services in the state.

(2) Two-year renewal fee, as determined by the department, based on the number of full-time equivalents (FTEs), including paid personnel or contractors needed to oversee the enforcement of this chapter.

(3) Other reasonable fees as prescribed by the department necessary for the administration of this chapter.

(b) The fees collected shall be deposited into the Home Care Fund pursuant to subdivision (b) of Section 1796.47.

Article  10. Complaints, Inspections, and Investigations
1796.51.

In order to carry out the provisions of this chapter, the department may establish procedures for the receipt, investigation, and resolution of complaints against home care organizations.

1796.52.

(a) The department may review and, if it determines necessary, investigate complaints filed against home care organizations regarding violations of this chapter or any rules or regulations promulgated under this chapter.

(b) The department shall verify through random, unannounced inspections that a home care organization meets the requirements of this chapter and the rules and regulations promulgated under this chapter.

(c) An investigation or inspection conducted by the department pursuant to this chapter may include, but is not limited to, inspection of the books, records, or premises of a home care organization. A home care organization’s refusal to make records, books, or premises available shall constitute cause for the revocation of the home care organization’s license.

(d) Other than maintaining the home care registry, the department shall have no oversight responsibility regarding registered home care aides.

1796.53.

A duly authorized officer, employee, or agent of the department may, upon presentation of proper identification, enter a home care organization during posted business hours, with or without advance notice, to secure compliance with, or to prevent a violation of, any provision of this chapter or any provision promulgated under this chapter.

Article  11. Enforcement
1796.55.

(a) A home care organization that operates in violation of any requirement or obligation imposed by this chapter or any rule or regulation promulgated under this chapter may be subject to the fines levied or licensure action taken by the department as specified in this chapter.

(b) When the department determines that a home care organization is in violation of this chapter or any rules or regulations promulgated under this chapter, a notice of violation shall be served upon the licensee. Each notice of violation shall be prepared in writing and shall specify the nature of the violation and the statutory provision, rule, or regulation alleged to have been violated. The notice shall inform the licensee of any action the department may take under this chapter, including the requirement of a plan of correction, assessment of a penalty, or action to suspend, revoke, or deny renewal of the license. The director or his or her designee shall also inform the licensee of rights to a hearing under this chapter.

(c) The department may impose a fine of up to nine hundred dollars ($900) per violation per day commencing on the date the violation was identified and ending on the date each violation is corrected, or action is taken to suspend, revoke, or deny renewal of the license, whichever comes first.

(d) The department shall adopt regulations establishing procedures for notices, correction plans, appeals, and hearings.

1796.56.

Any fines and penalties collected pursuant to this chapter shall be deposited into the Home Care Penalties Subaccount, which is hereby created within the Home Care Fund created pursuant to Section 1796.47. Moneys in this account shall, upon appropriation by the Legislature, be made available to the department for purposes of enforcing this chapter.

1796.57.

It is a misdemeanor for a person to falsely represent or present himself or herself as a home care aide applicant or registered home care aide.

1796.58.

Any person who violates this chapter, or who willfully or repeated violates a rule or regulation promulgated under this chapter, is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000) or by imprisonment in a county jail for a period not to exceed 180 days, or by both that fine and imprisonment.

1796.59.

(a) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, the district attorney of every county, and city attorneys in cities that have city attorneys who have jurisdiction to prosecute misdemeanors pursuant to Section 72193 of the Government Code, may, upon their own initiative or upon application by the department or its authorized representative, institute and conduct the prosecution of any action for violation within their county of this chapter or a rule or regulation promulgated under this chapter.

(b) The civil, criminal, and administrative remedies available to the department pursuant to this chapter are not exclusive, and may be sought and employed in any combination as determined by the department to enforce this chapter or a rule or regulation promulgated under this chapter.

Article  12. Operation
1796.61.

This chapter shall become operative on January 1, 2015.

1796.62.

This chapter and any rules and regulations promulgated pursuant to this chapter shall only be implemented to the extent that funds are made available through an appropriation in the annual Budget Act.

1796.63.

The department shall adopt, amend, or repeal, in accordance with Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of the Government Code, any reasonable rules, regulations, and standards as may be necessary or proper to carry out the purpose and intent of this chapter and to enable the department to exercise the powers and perform the duties conferred upon it by this chapter, not inconsistent with any of the provisions of any statute of this state. Notwithstanding the rulemaking provisions of the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), the department may implement and administer this chapter through written directives, without taking regulatory action, subject to the limitations provided in subdivision (b).

(a) The department shall post any proposed rules promulgated under this section on its public Internet Web site no earlier than 10 calendar days prior to the effective date of the proposed rule, which shall also include notification to the public regarding how members of the public may comment, including the date on which those comment must be received in order to be considered by the department.

(b) The department’s authority to implement and administer this section through written directives shall expire no later than 12 months after the written directives are promulgated and posted on a public Internet Web site, or upon the effective date of regulations promulgated in accordance with the Administrative Procedure Act (Chapter 3.5 (commencing with Section 11340) of Part 1 of Division 3 of Title 2 of the Government Code), whichever occurs sooner.

SEC. 2.

 No reimbursement is required by this act pursuant to Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution because the only costs that may be incurred by a local agency or school district will be incurred because this act creates a new crime or infraction, eliminates a crime or infraction, or changes the penalty for a crime or infraction, within the meaning of Section 17556 of the Government Code, or changes the definition of a crime within the meaning of Section 6 of Article XIII B of the California Constitution.

Take Online Caregiver Training to meet the AB 1217 Caregiver Training Requirements.


University of Missouri Nursing School Receives $19.8 Million Grant to Continue Elder Care Research

The Missouri Quality Initiative for Nursing Homes will be used as a national model for senior care and be able to continue researching the early detection of illnesses and interventions in coordinated care, including how to better prevent falls.

Every year at least 2.5 million elderly people are treated in emergency rooms for fall injuries, which costs about $34 billion annually, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. These falls may cause broken bones and head injuries which then lead to further complications such as brain trauma. Reducing senior care costs will be necessary as the government prepares for the large increase in the senior population.

Decreasing hospitalizations continues to be a goal for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The grant money for this research project comes from the budget of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services which is housed under the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services.

The project, called the Missouri Quality Initiative for Nursing Homes, will be used as a national model for senior care. Marilyn Rantz, MU's professor emerita of nursing founded the initiative in 2012, along with a team of MU research colleagues. By implementing motion sensors, such as Xbox Kinects, in various areas of the residents' apartments, the researchers were able to decrease falls. The sensors can recognize changes in walking, bending and other body movements that may signal an increased risk for falls. The average cost of a nursing home in Missouri for a single room is $143.80 per day. Decreasing the need for nursing home stays assists Medicare and Medicaid to save millions of dollars a year.

The nursing school will also use the grant to research the early detection of illnesses and interventions in coordinated care, a model in which several health care professionals work together to ensure a patient's good health. Sixteen Missouri nursing homes have implemented the University's coordinated care model which resulted in a 34.5 percent decrease in potentially avoidable hospitalizations. Nursing home care can cost 

There are more than 16,000 nursing homes in the U.S.A. and Medicare does not pay for an ongoing stay in a nursing home but Medicaid, for low-income seniors, does pay for ongoing nursing home care. 

Plan your senior care plan ahead of time to best know the options and costs of care in your area. Transamerica also offers a free senior care financial planning consultation by calling 1-877-957-9851. Caregiverlist provides the only resource with the actual costs of nursing homes nationwide along with a customized nursing home rating.



Alaska Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

Where are the most expensive nursing homes in the U.S.? Not surprisingly, Alaska takes the title of state with costliest nursing homes in America once again, according to the updated Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Index. And again, Alaska wins by a landslide, with an average daily room cost of $573.90 (based on both private and semi-private rooms.) The next most expensive nursing homes can be found in Hawaii, whose average daily nursing home costs are $376.66.

Why are nursing home costs so high in Alaska? Many factors contribute to costs, especially in rural areas where even gas and electricity are costlier. Then there’s the law of supply and demand — there are simply more people vying for fewer resources. In addition to Native Alaskans living longer, non-natives who migrated to the state during the oil and construction boom of past years have decided to stay and age there, creating what experts are calling a “silver tsunami.” Who knows if Alaska’s nursing home infrastructure will be able to support its future elderly population? Right now, however, Caregiverlist data shows that the 18 nursing homes in Alaska have an average star rating of 3.5 (out of 5.)

Here’s a snapshot of Alaska nursing home data:
Total Number of Nursing Homes: 18
Average Single Price: $621.38
Average Double Price: $526.43
Average Rating: 3.5

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 6
4-Star: 6
3-Star: 4
2-Star: 2
1-Star: 0

Senior care costs, especially the costs incurred by long-term nursing home stay, is something most people don’t think about until it’s too late, usually after the Medicare-paid first 100 days of post-hospital rehabilitation. A good place for families to begin anticipating future costs is by talking to a professional and coming up with a financial action plan. Caregiverlist can provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in Tennessee and help you learn about the costs for senior care. Seniors and their family caregivers can also research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.


Senior Caregiving Activities: Check out Live Bald Eagle Cam of Baby Eagles

Caregivers may check out this live eagle camera monitoring the daily activities of two newborn eaglets in a nest in our nation's capital. If you are looking for a new activity to add to the Activities of Daily Living you assist a senior with each day, this could be a nice new addition. You will witness the eagle parents, appropriately named Mr. President and First Lady, caring for their little eagles with all the excitement living in a nest in a Tulip Poplar tree among the azalea bushes at the U.S. National Arboretum brings. "Anything can happen" the American Eagle Foundation warns.


Engaging in daily activities delivers healthy mental stimulation and socialization for seniors, including for senior's with Alzheimer's disease. By watching the eagles caregivers may engage in many topics of conversation about eagles, including how the bird became the national symbol for the U.S.A., what they like to eat (yes, you will see Mr. President and First Lady fly in freshly killed fish), how eagles were an endangered species and siblicide.


Siblicide means the killing of an infant by its close relative (and you though adult children had challenges when deciding on the best senior care plan for a parent)! Many times baby eagles will perform siblicide in the early weeks of their birth as a survival defense, with the older sibling usually killing the younger sibling. But now these eaglets are out of the woods on this, so to speak. Human siblings also can stay out of the woods with arguments on senior care by researching to create a senior care plan and by working with a Care Manager to assist with planning and implementing the senior care. Transamerica offers a complimentary financial planning consultation to understand senior care costs and a free caregiving guide.


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© 2016 American Eagle Foundation, EAGLES.ORG.

© 2016 American Eagle Foundation, EAGLES.ORG.

Visit the DC Eagle Nest Cam


Caregiverlist® provides adult siblings with resources to find the best senior care options for their loved ones, including the

daily rates of nursing homes nationwide and ratings on the most important criteria to help siblings find the best place for their parents.

Tennessee Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

Tennessee is full of attractions, both natural and man-(and woman-)made. When I went, I loved visiting the Great Smoky Mountain National Park, the Grand Ole Opry, Graceland, and my favorite, Dollywood. It also has a low adjusted cost of living and no state income tax (unless you count the highly contested Hall tax on interest and dividend income from investments.) There are only about 10 states that have lower daily nursing home costs than Tennessee, according to Caregiverlist’s updated national nursing home cost database, with a daily room rate of $173.22 (the state average of single and shared rooms,) or $63,225 per year. Tennessee nursing homes carry average star rating of 2.6 out of 5.

How much do nursing homes in Tennessee cost? Senior care planning includes understanding costs of nursing homes, along with their overall ratings. It’s a fact that most people don’t even think about nursing home costs until long-term care is needed—like after the first 100 days of Medicare-covered care. Caregiverlist updates our nursing home cost database so seniors and their families can get an idea of long-term care costs in their area.

Below is a snapshot of Tennessee nursing home costs and ratings:

Total Number of Nursing Homes: 354
Average Single Price: $185.95
Average Double Price: $160.50
Average Rating: 2.6

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 6
4-Star: 85
3-Star: 169
2-Star: 60
1-Star: 34

Which is the highest rated nursing home in Tennessee? The Tennessee nursing home with the highest Caregiverlist Nursing Home Rating for which we have a daily cost is Somerfield At The Heritage in Brentwood, Tennessee. However, it is also one of the most expensive, with a single room daily price of $288.00—54.88% higher than the average single price of $185.95.

The number of elderly and adults with physical disabilities receiving care in a nursing home setting has dropped by over 30% since 2005 according to TennCare, Tennessee’s Long-Term Services & Supports website. Those seniors for whom 24-hour care is not needed, may choose to avail themselves of home and community based services, who have seen a substantial growth in as many years.



How can families begin anticipating for future long-term care costs? A good place to start is consulting with a professional who can come up with a financial action plan, something that includes an assessment of your family’s assets and future spending needs. Caregiverlist can provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in Tennessee and help you learn about the costs for senior care. Seniors and their family caregivers can also research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.

Idaho Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

Idaho is known as The Gem State and, due to its relatively low cost of living, often makes the list of best states in which to retire. Are like the ~4.2 percent of the elderly population receiving nursing home care? if you are in Idaho, you’re in luck. Idaho is the 9th least expensive state in Caregiverlist’s national nursing home cost database, with a room rate of $247.57, the state average of single and shared rooms and has an average star rating of 3.2 out of 5 stars.

Senior care planning includes understanding costs of nursing homes, along with their overall ratings. Caregiverlist updates our nursing home cost database so seniors and their families can get an idea of long-term care costs in their area.

Below is a snapshot of Idaho nursing home costs and ratings:
Total Number of Nursing Homes: 84
Average Single Price: $284.33
Average Double Price: $210.81
Average Rating: 3.2

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 7
4-Star: 44
3-Star: 24
2-Star: 3
1-Star: 6

The Idaho nursing home with one of the highest Caregiverlist Nursing Home Rating is Ashton Living Center in Ashton, Idaho. Its single room daily price of $166.00 is 41.5% lower than the average single price of $284.33 and its semi-private room price is $156.00 or 25.7% lower than the average price of $210.81 for semi-private nursing home rooms in Idaho. Of course, there are alternatives to skilled nursing homes for long term senior care.

If 24-hour care is not needed, many seniors and their families choose in-home care provided by a qualified CNA, an assisted living community, adult day care, or a combination of these. The average yearly rate for professional senior home care in Idaho is approximately $$46,332, according to a recent Genworth Cost of Care survey. The median annual rate of full-day adult day care is $30,225. The average annual cost for Idaho nursing homes is approximately $90,365 (single rooms costs are, of course, higher, as are costs for residents with special needs.)

Most people don’t know how much nursing home care costs and few people think of the cost of care until it’s too late to plan. Caregiverlist can provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in Idaho and help you learn about the costs for senior care.

Seniors and their family caregivers can research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.

Alabama Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

Alabama is the “Heart of Dixie” and home to some of the most important moments of the American Civil Rights movement. And you can’t watch a season of College Football without hearing the call, “Roll Tide!” Alabama ranks 7th least expensive in Caregiverlist’s national nursing home cost database, with an average room rate of $159.68, yet it has a very respectable nursing home average star rating of 3.2.

Alabama nursing homes have the lowest percent of long stay residents who have depressive symptoms, according to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. The national average for depression is 6.1 percent, and both Alabama and Mississippi show 1.7 percent depression in nursing home residents.

Caregiverlist updates our nursing home cost and star ratings database so seniors and their families can get an idea of long-term senior care costs in their area. Senior care planning includes understanding costs of nursing homes in the chosen area, along with their overall ratings. Most people don’t know how much nursing home care costs and few people think of the cost of care until it’s too late to financially plan for long term care.

Below is a snapshot of Alabama nursing home costs and ratings:

Total Number of Nursing Homes: 236
Average Single Price: $166.49
Average Double Price: $152.86
Average Rating: 3.2 (out of 5)

Star Rating Snapshot
5-Star: 27
4-Star: 115
3-Star: 80
2-Star: 5
1-Star: 9

 Many seniors and their families opt for in-home care provided by a qualified CNA. The average yearly rate for professional senior home care in Alabama is approximately $37.752, according to a recent Genworth Cost of Care survey. A quality home care agency will provide liability and worker's compensation insurance and payroll taxes as required by law, as well as perform a thorough background check.

The Alabama nursing homes with the highest Caregiverlist Nursing Home Rating is TLC Nursing Center in Oneonta. However, the single room prices here are 45.41% higher than the average single price of $166.49 and double rooms are 3.25% higher than the average double price of $152.86 in Alabama at $305 and $158 respectively. Another highly-rated nursing home, Jackson Health Care Facility, offers single rooms for $142 (17.25% lower than the average single price) and semi-private rooms for $137 (11.58% lower than the average double price).

Caregiverlist can provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in Alabama and help you learn about the costs for senior care. Seniors and their family caregivers can research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.


New Jersey Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings Updated

New Jersey is known as the Garden State and is home to Bruce Springsteen, Snooki, and the Statue of Liberty. It’s also the sixth most expensive state to live in, based on Council for Community and Economic Research Cost of Living Index for the first quarter. It’s no wonder, then, that New Jersey ranks 7th most expensive in Caregiverlist’s national nursing home cost database, with an average room rate of $301.68 per day, or about $110,000 annually.

New Jersey nursing homes factor greatly in the state’s economy, contributing $5.4 billion to local and state coffers. They also employ over 55,000 full-time workers, according to one report. That report states that New Jersey's elderly population is projected to increase by 27.2 percent between 2010 and 2020, and by an additional 27.1 percent between 2020 and 2030, meaning there will be approximately 1.9 million elderly residents by 2030. Data shows that 35 percent of the elderly population will need some sort of nursing home care (both short- and long-term) during their lives. That puts the number of beds needed at 665,000. Currently, there are just under 55,000 beds in New Jersey nursing homes.

New Jersey senior care planning includes understanding costs of nursing homes in the chosen area, along with their overall ratings. Most people don’t know how much nursing home care costs and few people think of the cost of care until it’s too late to plan.

Long-term senior care costs are among our readers’ top concerns. Because of that, Caregiverlist constantly updates our nursing home cost database and have released the latest costs and ratings for New Jersey nursing homes.

Below is a snapshot of New Jersey nursing home costs and ratings:

Total Number of Nursing Homes: 376
Average Single Price: $312.40
Average Double Price: $290.97
Average Rating: 2.8 (out of 5)

Star Rating Snapshot:
5-Star: 9
4-Star: 124
3-Star: 194
2-Star: 41
1-Star: 8

In-home caregiving is an alternative to institutional care If around-the-clock care is not needed. The average yearly rate for professional senior home care in New Jersey is approximately $48,500. A quality home care agency will provide liability and worker's compensation insurance and payroll taxes as required by law.

The New Jersey nursing home with the highest Caregiverlist Nursing Home Rating is Saint Anne Villa in Florham Park. However, this facility is only available to the infirm and retired Sisters of Charity of St. Elizabeth. Next on the list New Community Extended Care Facility in Newark (4.4 stars), a nursing home with 180 beds whose daily single-room cost, $325, is 3.88% higher than the average single price of $312.40. Another top rated facility, Sunnyside Manor in Manasquan (4.2 stars), is a 54 bed facility whose daily single-room cost, $276, is 13.19% lower than the average price of a single room.

Caregiverlist can provide a care plan to find senior home care agency options in New Jersey and help you learn about the costs for senior care. Seniors and their family caregivers can research nursing home costs and ratings in any state nationwide through the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Directory, the only resource with this trademarked information.
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