Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features tulips that may bring color into your life as a caregiver. Thank you for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week Tulips

"Opportunities are never lost. The other fellow takes those you miss."

Anonymous

 

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features blue skies and interesting landscape. Thank you for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiverlist Stress Relief Photo of the Week

"Well done is better than well said."

Benjamin Franklin

Alzheimer's Research Charity: July Quilts

 

The Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative auctions 27 quilts online each month. Quilts range in size-- 9' x 12' and smaller. Please take some time to view the July quilts for auction the 1st through the 10th. All proceeds from the auction fund Alzheimer's research.

Read more on the Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative

Please look at a few of the quilts for auction below.

Review all July 2013 quilts here.

The Alzheimer's Art Quilt Initiative® is a national, grassroots charity whose mission is to raise awareness and fund research. The AAQI auctions and sells donated quilts, and sponsors a nationally touring exhibit of quilts about Alzheimer's. The AAQI has raised more than $916,000 since January 2006. Ami Simms of Flint, Michigan is the founder and executive director of the AAQI, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit operated entirely by volunteers. She is a quilter. Her mother had Alzheimer's.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week take a trip to Naples, Florida to see one of a kind sunset. Thank you for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.

Caregiverlist Caregiver Stress Relief Photo Sunset

"What great thing would you attempt if you knew you could not fail?"

Robert H. Schuller

Inside the Dementia Epidemic: Indie Award-Winning Author Shares Story About Caring for Mother

Martha Stettinius is the award-winning author of the book “Inside the Dementia Epidemic: A Daughter’s Memoir,” and until recently a “sandwich generation” caregiver for her mother, Judy, who had vascular dementia and probable Alzheimer’s disease. When Judy, 72, could no longer live alone in her remote lakeside cottage—when she stopped cooking and cleaning, lost a lot of weight, and was in danger of falling—Martha encouraged her to move into her home with her husband, Ben, and their two children. For 8 years, until Judy passed away late last year, Martha was her primary caregiver at home, in assisted living, a rehab center, a “memory care” facility, and a nursing home. Martha serves as a volunteer representative for the Caregiver Action Network (a national organization providing caregiver support and advocacy) and as an expert in dementia care for the website eCareDiary.

In this short excerpt from “Inside the Dementia Epidemic: A Daughter’s Memoir,” Martha writes about taking her mother to visit her old cottage, and learning that day to see dementia differently.

In late October, two and a half years since she moved in with us, I bring Mom along with me and Ben and the kids for an afternoon at the lake. I imagine that she will light up at the sight of the cottage, but as she sits outside with me in the front yard in the shade of an umbrella, and watches the waves, her expression is flat, muted, as if the yard is just a place like any other.
At first, I feel deflated, but within moments I realize something: It’s time for me to stop trying to bring my mother pleasure through what’s left of her memory. If she no longer recognizes the deep blue swell of her lake, if these pieces of her life no longer move her, then truly there’s nothing but the present moment—and other people.

I decide to take her out for a rowboat ride. I wonder if feeling the rowboat rock softly on the water will help my mother experience the joy in the lake she used to feel in her canoe, or when she watched the waves from her desk.
Ben helps me support Mom under her arms as she steps in. Mom sits in the middle of the wide seat along the back of the boat, Andrew [our 12-year-old] squeezes into the bow, and from the middle seat I row the three of us a hundred feet out into the lake. I keep my eyes on hers. She grips the edge of the seat, her back ramrod straight, her eyes wide but not scared. We bounce gently on the waves and Mom releases her hands from the seat to stretch her arms and clasp the sides of the boat. She smiles. When I tell her that she can lean against the high back wall of the boat, she scoots her bottom toward the wall and relaxes.

Back on shore, there’s a problem. We find that Ben has gone off to the store; Andrew and I have to pull up the heavy boat and get Grammy out on our own. I call Morgan [our 10-year-old] out of the house for her help. We hold Grammy’s hands and coach her to walk up the length of the boat from the back, which is still in the water, to the bow so we can help her step out onto the beach. She stands on the seat in the bow, too high to step down. I ask Andrew and Morgan to find a stool in the boathouse and they bicker about who should go. Andrew finds my garden stool, which has wheels, and I wedge it between my feet beside the boat and try to persuade Mom to step down on it.

“Don’t make me cry,” she says.

My heart flares for a moment with guilt, but she trusts me and her fear passes quickly. She holds my hands firmly as I ask Andrew to carry over one of the lawn chairs. Mom hesitates, then lifts one leg over the rail of the boat and steps onto the chair, brings her other leg over, pauses, then steps down to the garden stool and then onto the shale, where she tucks her slender shoulders into my arms. Such a production! I can’t believe I asked my mother, who just recovered from a pelvic fracture, to clamber in and out of a boat.

But I’m glad I did. In the boat Mom seemed to absorb it all—my attention as I held her eye and smiled at her, the breeze, the blue-green waves, the gentle push of the oars, the firmness of the boat’s floor under her Keds. When we passed our neighbors on their dock Mom had let go of the side of the boat to wave with a big smile.

Without memory, I think to myself, what’s left? Not destinations like going to the cottage—not the pleasure of their anticipation and repetition—but moments like these, of sense and touch, rhythm and movement, patience and reassurance.

"Inside the Dementia Epidemic: A Daughter's Memoir” is available through all major online book retailers as a paperback and e-book. Martha can be contacted through her website and blog, www.insidedementia.com, and on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Google+.

 

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers that care for the elderly know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers, professional caregivers and certified nursing assistants to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo features sunny hills of small Mexican town called Taxco, famous for its silver mines. We would like to thank you for caring for our loved seniors. Remember senior caregivers are needed, please refer-a-friend to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our Caregiver Career Center for additional career tools. 

 

Caregiverlist Caregiver Stress Relief Photo Mountains

"Anger is a wind which blows out the lamp of the mind."

Robert G. Ingersoll

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. Take a moment to look into clear calm waters full of pretty waterlilies. Thank you for caring for our seniors. Remember more caregivers are needed, please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools. 

 

"Go the extra mile, it’s never crowded."

Executive Speechwriter Newsletter

Dementia Week 2013: Be Aware of Signs and Symptoms and How to Seek Care

National Dementia Week, from May 19th through May 25th, highlights senior care needs for those with Alzheimer’s Disease and other types of dementia.  There are many ways of getting involved and being aware such as knowing the signs and symptoms of dementia and knowing how to find care for your family member or friend in need.

Dementia occurs when the brain slowly loses its ability to process thoughts and is a decline in the cognitive function.  There are many diseases that cause dementia-- Alzheimer’s being the most well-known.  Other diseases that cause dementia include Lewy body disease, fronto-temporal dementia, vascular dementia, and many more.

The neurological symptoms associated with dementia can unfortunately affect our loved ones. What can you do when dementia affects your mother, father, aunt or grandfather?  One should be aware of the signs and symptoms.  Your family member or friend may experience memory loss, moodiness and/or communication difficulties.  As the dementia progresses, all of these symptoms may lead to a serious struggle for your family member or friend to get through the day on their own. 

What can you do when your loved one can no longer take care of themselves? 

Are you able to take care of them yourself? Or, will you need outside and additional help?

Caregiverlist  provides information on quality senior care companies and the daily costs of nursing homes nationwide.  Anyone seeking senior care options may submit a request to “find senior care” to be connected with quality companies in their area.  You can specify type of care—such as home care, assisted living, nursing home, etc.— and additional information such as the monthly budget and unique needs.

Anyone who may have gained experience as a caregiver while caring for a loved one with memory loss, may consider becoming a professional senior caregiver and submit a job application to be connected with hiring companies in their area.   

This Dementia Awareness Week, take some time to get acquainted with dementia and what Caregiverlist can do to help out your family or friend! 

-Kristin Kruk

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week: Sunrise Peaking Behind the Islands

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. Thank you for caring for our seniors. Remember more caregivers are needed, please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools. 

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo with Islands

"Feelings are everywhere, be gentle."

J. Masai

Alzheimer's and Dementia Responsible for 1 in 3 Senior Deaths, Report Shows

A new Alzheimer’s Association report, 2013 Alzheimer's Disease Facts & Figures, released yesterday, indicates that the disease is now the sixth leading cause of death, taking the lives of 1 in 3 seniors.

And while death from other diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and stroke decline, Alzheimer's deaths continue to rise, increasing 68% from 2000-2010. The reason? According to the report, it is the only cause of death among the top 10 in America without a way to prevent it, cure it or even slow its progression.

The mortality rate for Alzheimer’s and dementia, while certainly increasing as the population ages, isn’t a new phenomenon. However, the reporting of death from dementia and Alzheimer’s may have been previously under-reported, according to  Susan Mitchell, a professor of medicine at Harvard and a scientist at Hebrew Senior Life Institute for Aging Research.

Alzheimer's patients tend to have other health problems as well, she says. Alzheimer’s and dementia lead to the death of nerve cells. In the beginning stages of the disease, the cells damaged mostly affect memory and behavior. As the disease progresses, the brain cells damaged control body functions. For example, a person suffering from dementia may lose their ability to swallow correctly. Food goes down the wrong way, resulting in lung damage and finally pneumonia. And it is that pneumonia which has been listed as the cause of death, and not the underlying dementia from which it stemmed.

From a caregiving standpoint, almost 15% of those caregiving for loved ones are doing it long-distance — living an hour or more away and they pay nearly twice as much out-of-pocket for care as their onsite counterparts. However, the emotional toll is understandably greater for those who must deal with caregiving on their own. “More than 60 percent of Alzheimer's and dementia caregivers rate the emotional stress of caregiving as high or very high; more than one-third report symptoms of depression.” These are the family caregivers who desperately need help in the form of respite caregivers.

Caregiving for Seniors with Alzheimer’s or dementia requires a special skill set and the need for skilled caregivers is only going to increase. State training requirements vary, but Caregiverlist, along with Terra Nova Films, presents training videos to assist you with understanding how to care for special needs of older adults suffering with Alzheimer’s or dementia.

If you are a certified nursing aide, home health aide, companion caregiver or family caregiver, these videos will help you improve upon your current skills and learn about the latest approaches for successful caregiving.

And read Norm McNamara’s Caregiverlist Diary to gain a better understanding of the daily challenges faced by those living with Alzheimer’s.

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