Caregivers Need Care Too: World Alzheimer's Day

World Alzheimer’s Day was observed on September 21, 2014. Because of the nature of the disease, caregiving for a person with such a degenerative memory condition can be especially taxing.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, in 2013, 15.5 million family and friends provided 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care to those with Alzheimer's and other dementias – care valued at $220.2 billion. Alzheimer's and dementia caregivers had $9.3 billion in additional health care costs of their own, due to the physical and emotional burden of caregiving. This doesn’t even take into account lost employment income and the out-of-pocket costs associated with in-home care. A recent study showed that 54% of family caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias had to go
in late, leave early, or take time off and 7% had to turn down a promotion due to the demands of caregiving.

Family caregivers are often reluctant to reach out for help. Middle-stage caregiving lasts longest and this is where most family caregiving occurs. The person living with Alzheimer’s doesn’t yet need the extensive (and expensive) care that late-stage Alzheimer’s demands, so often a spouse, child, or other family member provides the needed care. At this stage, the person with Alzheimer’s may have a more difficult time expressing their thoughts and may anger easily. They have an increased need for help as their independence decreases. Caregivers need patience and flexibility, but it’s important to realize that providing this level of care bring with it a higher level of caregiver stress and burnout.

You know how, on an airplane, the flight attendant will instruct passengers to, in case of emergency, place an oxygen mask on themselves before helping others? Same thing goes for family caregiving, especially when caring for those with AD or dementia. What starts out as a labor of love often turns into feelings of resentment, isolation, depression, and the physical problems (such as hypertension and coronary heart disease) associated with chronic stress.

Caregiver stress and caregiver burnout are prevalent and may counterac the caregiver’s original intent to keep the care recipient at home. For example, when caregivers report being stressed because of the impaired person’s behaviors, it increases the chance that they will place that person in a nursing home.

There are, however, several interventions that are proven to help the family caregiver.

Work with a Professional
A Geriatric Care Manager can help assess the needs of someone afflicted with Alzheimer’s and dementia and provide information, referral, and help with care coordination. They can be a strong advocate for the family caregiver.

Get Counseling
Professionals can help resolve conflicts between caregiver and care recipient and help the caregiver work through emotional overload.

Find Support Groups
Online and offline, it is important to know you are not alone in your caregiving, and that the emotions you are feeling—as well as the physical challenges you experience are experienced by others as well.

Get Respite Help
Ask for help, hire help, demand help. Reach out before you burn out. Just because you don’t do it alone doesn’t mean you’ve failed. Much-needed breaks will make you a better caregiver.

Make Nutrition and Exercise a Priority
Many caregivers say they simply don’t have the time to care for themselves. If you aren’t healthy and strong, you can’t take care of anyone else. Lead your care recipient by example. Eat well and schedule exercise breaks.

September and October see Walk(s) to End Alzheimer’s all over the country. There may still be available dates in your area. See if you can start or join a team and see just how strong the caring community is.

And check back with this blog in November, which is not only National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month, but also National Caregiver Month.

"The Genius of Marian" Shows Love Beyond Alzheimer's

Here are some startling latest Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures from the Alzheimer's Association:

  • More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Alzheimer's disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States.
  • In 2013, 15.5 million caregivers provided an estimated 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care valued at more than $220 billion
  • Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer's are women.

Pam White is one of those women. Her own mother, the renowned painter Marian Williams Steele, herself died of Alzheimer’s in 2001 at the age of 89. Ms. White was in the midst of writing a biography of her mother, entitled “The Genius of Marian” when she began exhibiting the signs of early-onset dementia. Because she was struggling with typing and other tasks, her filmmaker son, Banker White, began to videotape conversations with his mother with the hope of helping her continue her project.

What came out of those conversations is a film that captures big events and small, as Ms. White details and recalls the events of her life. It also catches the struggle of a loving family as they deal with the complex emotions of losing a loved one to the disease.

It was an audience favorite at the Tribeca Film festival and, by all accounts, is a remarkable film—both for its subject matter and the intimacy and love with which it’s displayed.

In December of 2012, Banker White wrote a guest blogpost for Maria Shriver’s Inspirational Stories for Architects of Change, describing the powerful process of filmmaking this incredibly personal project.

“I believe the story is deeply important and powerfully told and I trust it will resonate not only for those directly affected by Alzheimer’s disease, but for with anyone who has had to reconcile complicated emotions around aging and loss.”



“It’s a remarkable film, not only for the obvious affection with which it was made, but as art.” – John Anderson, INDIEWIRE

David Shenk, award-winning, national-bestselling author of six books, including what is commonly known as the “the definitive work on Alzheimer’s,” The Forgetting (2001), served as consultant on the film. His short video below, provides an engaging and informative introduction to Alzheimer's disease.


The film will air nationally for the first time on PBS’s POV on Sept. 8 and film screenings are available for communal viewing. I’m inking the television debut on my calendar and hoping that Caregiverlist will be able to host a viewing in the Chicago area soon.

Alzheimer's Caregivers Cannot Sue, Rules California Court

Seniors who suffer Alzheimer’s can be a challenge to their professional caregivers, especially those who are able to age at home, outside of an institutional setting like a nursing home. Especially in later stages, Alzheimer’s patients and those with other dementia’s can be aggressive, angry, and violent. That can be a very difficult environment, especially for the in-home professional caregiver.

But if a senior caregiver suffers an injury at the hands of their Alzheimer’s client, they cannot sue the patient nor their family or estate for damages, according to a ruling by the California Supreme Court. Monday’s ruling came as a result of a case of a home health aide who was cut with a knife by her elderly client.

Prior to hiring her as to aid his ailing wife, a Los Angeles man informed the agency and the home health aide that his wife was prone to violent outbursts, including biting and scratching. Because of this prior knowledge, the court ruled 5-2 that it would not be appropriate to allow workers to sue their employers. 

California law already states that caregivers in nursing homes and other institutional facilities cannot sue Alzheimer’s patients who hurt them because those risks are inherent in their duties, especially since it’s well known that , although it’s not common for Alzheimer’s patients to become violent, discomfort and confusion can cause a violent flare-up.

The ruling is intended to help families keep their loved ones as home longer. If home healthcare workers were allowed to sue, families might decide it more financial sense to put seniors with memory issues into a nursing home.

Senior caregivers who are not warned of their client’s potential violent nature are precluded from future lawsuits, the court added. 

The best way a professional caregiver can learn how to deal with Alzheimer’s and dementia sufferers and help prevent latent violent outbursts is to partake in professional caregiver training. Caregiverlist® Basic Training, powered by Caregiver Training University provides the elemental training for every in-home caregiver. In addition, Caregiverlist® offers training videos especially for care techniques for those giving care to those with Alzheimer’s and other memory loss diseases.

Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia: What's the Difference?

It happens almost imperceptibly — a misplaced wallet, a forgotten word or name, short-term memory loss. These incidents can be normal blips in memory, but sometimes they can be indications of a more serious cognitive degeneration. The fear of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease can keep a person in the state of denial. In fact, new figures show half of those who are diagnosed with dementia waited at least six months before seeing their doctor.

The Alzheimer’s Association says that of more than 6000 people surveyed, nearly a quarter of list Alzheimer’s disease as the second most frightening condition they most fear getting, behind cancer. More than 80% believe that the disease is a normal part of aging, and nearly 40% of people believed that only those with a family history of the disease could be affected.

But Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It's a disease that causes brain cells to malfunction and ultimately die. Neurons are the chief type of cell destroyed by Alzheimer's disease. That causes memory changes, erratic behaviors and loss of body functions. It’s a sad fact that Alzheimer’s has no survivors. The disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. The Alzheimer’s Association is asking everyone affected by the disease to show their commitment to the cause by wearing purple and posting to social media sites like Facebook. As they say on their website, “Everyone who has a brain is at risk to develop Alzheimer's—but everyone can help to fight it.”

A number of celebrities have banded together to support Alzheimer’s awareness. Recently, actor and Alzheimer’s activist Seth Rogan spoke to congress about the need to allocate more funding to research and eradicate the disease that strikes so many, including his mother-in-law.

BradleyCooper

Bradley Cooper proudly promotes purple to #ENDALZ.

All Alzheimer’s disease is dementia but not all dementia is Alzheimer’s. Dementia is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms. Although Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, there are a variety of other dementia types. These include Vascular dementia, or post-stroke dementia, which accounts for about 10% of all dementia cases. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) sufferers are more likely than people with Alzheimer's to have early symptoms such as visual hallucinations and muscle rigidity. Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus are also types of dementia. Some of these diseases are treatable. Unfortunately, no cure or treatment slows or stops some of these progressive dementia diseases, like Alzheimer’s. But there are drug treatments that may temporarily improve symptoms.

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is often, but not always, a precursor to dementia. If you’ve been diagnosed with MCI, or are caring for a senior with Mild Cognitive Impairment, there’s a lot you can do to ease the ease and reduce the signs of MCI. For example, it’s been found that, coupled with a healthy diet, regular exercise can have a very positive impact on the brain and cognitive function.

Caregiverlist® urges if you are a senior caregiver whose family member or client presents any symptoms of memory loss, to seek the counsel of a doctor. Early detection is key in order to benefit from treatment and to plan for the future. Some dementia disorders are treatable — such as depression, drug interactions, thyroid problems, excess use of alcohol or certain metabolic disorders, such as a vitamin B12 deficiency .

If you or your beloved senior has Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, share your story with the world. Reach out to us on Twitter @Caregiverlist and don't forget to use #gopurple and #endalz to join the conversation. It’s time we destigmafy Alzheimer’s and other memory loss diseases.

10 Elder Care Tips to Make Senior Care Easier

Elder Law "Super Lawyer" Ben Neiburger shares 10 Elder Care Tips

May is Elder Law Month and when I hear “Elder Law,” I think of Caregiverlist® Elder Law Expert, Ben Neiberger. Since 1994, Ben has been giving legal and lay audiences a reprieve from some of the most complex and boring topics in the legal field (specifically, ERISA, Medicaid, and Eldercare). His delivery style helps you understand the important aspects of these topics in a way that gives you the ability to understand the legal issues you must know. Here, Ben shares his 10 Tips for surviving elder care to help you through the caregiving process and ensure you provide the best care possible for your loved one

Oh, and the moniker "Super-Lawyer" is real. Mr. Neiburger was named a “Super Lawyer” in Elder Law by Thompson Reuters and the publishers of Chicago magazine. Only three other attorneys in the state of Illinois were recognized this way in 2013. He also received this honor in 2007 and 2009 through 2014.

For Caregiverlist readers only, Ben is offering letting us give away his new ebook Brighter Skies: Your Blueprint to Navigating Elder Care. It’s a simple to understand guide that was written to make the process of Elder Care more bearable and less stressful for families. Follow these tips and you will spare yourself and your loved ones unnecessary pain in both the long and short terms.

Having practiced elder law for as long as I have, I've observed a number of issues that recur for families trying to negotiate the complex matters that come to the fore when assisting loved ones in the final stages of their life.

To that end, I’ve identified 10 principles that you need to pay attention to. Using these principles as a guide, you can develop strategies to help you and your family negotiate this very complex and emotional time.

Tip one – Put no one else before you and your family. You have a moral obligation to care for your parents, spouse and children. To do so well, you need to be informed, plan ahead, and take care of yourself first; the earlier the better.

Tip two – Let others help you. Find a trusted team of experts to help you through the health, legal and financial issues of end- of-life healthcare and planning. Geriatricians, care managers, elder law attorneys, accountants and financial planners are key advisors during this time.

Tip three – Act only with legal authority. There will come a time when you must make health-care and financial decisions for your elder when they cannot make decisions for themselves. Protect your loved one’s dignity and privacy by having them sign powers of attorney for property and health care before it’s too late.

Tip four – Rest. You are only human. Sometimes, the caregiving process requires an incredible amount of time, effort, blood, sweat, and tears. Even the strongest of us only last a matter of weeks or months before the stress of caregiving overwhelms our human capacity to provide that care. Hire caregivers, seek respite care, or let other family members, friends, or social agencies assist in providing care. You need rest and time to work and enjoy your own life, spouse and children. And only in doing so, will you be able to provide the best care for your loved one(s).

Tip five – Honor your loved one and preserve their independence as long as medically advisable. No one really wants to live in a nursing home. Most people want to live a dignified and independent life in their own home as long as possible. If it can be done safely, try to enable your loved one to live at home or in a non-nursing home community setting. If you want to support your parent in his or her home, but require additional funds for caregivers, reverse mortgages (including private family mortgages) can be a viable option.

Tip six –Make a financial plan. Assisted living and long-term care can be quite expensive. You need to take steps to ensure that your loved one’s funds last as long as possible. The longer his or her funds last, the more care options there are and the more independence they can have. Encourage your loved one to create a financial plan (including long-term care insurance, if possible) to generate enough income to cover long-term care at home, in an assisted living facility, or a nursing home when the time comes. Such a plan should be set up sooner than later.

Tip seven – Respect your loved one’s end-of-life wishes. As the last chapter of somebody’s life begins to close, the only thing many people have left is their family and personal dignity. It is your job as caregiver to do all you can to honor that dignity, as well as the wishes that preserve it. There will come a time when your loved one cannot tell you what they want. Take time to have a discussion with them beforehand on issues such as life-sustaining medical treatment and hospice, last rites, and their final resting place. Communicate these wishes to the entire family to ensure that such plans will be honored without familial strife when the time comes.

Tip eight – You can’t always control a progressive disease or sudden illness. There are some health conditions that improve with, and respond to treatment. There are others that do not, no matter what you do. Understand the condition or ailment that your loved one has, and do not expect miracles to occur as a result of treatment. Manage from that point forward. Many times, people do not recover from dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, or major strokes.

Tip nine – A nursing home placement isn't a death sentence. No one wants to go to a nursing home for their twilight years. Thirty or 40 years ago, families cared for loved ones at home until they died. Back then, people typically didn’t last longer than a few months, but with advances in medicine, the elderly now live on for years. Families need to rethink their objections to nursing homes because of the increase in end-of- life lifespans.

Tip ten – Try to mitigate family conflict. Family conflict at the end of a parent’s life is sometimes inevitable. However, an often unspoken wish for any person in the twilight of their life is the hope their children will get along after they pass on. A third-party is sometimes needed to assist in the decision making process. Sometimes transparency and disclosure will help. Other times, with a little more guidance and understanding, the children can make it through the process and keep their focus on ensuring their parents maintain their dignity as well as crucial family harmony.

I’ve create a series of short videos to further flush out these concepts. The goal is simple. Help you and your family make the best of a tough situation.

Ben is an active m

ember of the National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (NAELA) and a member of the Executive Committee and Board of Directors for the Illinois Institute of Continuing Legal Education and through frequent speaking engagements and ongoing course work both locally and nationally, is in continuous pursuit of knowledge and insight to the laws and finances that affect our families and senior citizens. He brings this wealth of knowledge, his clear and common sense explanations, his patience, gentle humor and sensitivity to each of his legal consultations.To read more on each of these ten principles, go to generationlaw.com.

Caregiverlist's® Nursing Home Star-Ratings take the top criteria from the government inspection reports to help you choose the right and best nursing home for you or your loved one, if you should need one.

Caregiver Support Translates to Saved $$

Caregiver stress can have debilitating consequences on senior caregivers. Reports show that family caregivers tend to experience anxiety, loss of sleep, and become ill more frequently than their non-caregiving counterparts. An estimated 5.2 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease in 2014. Seniors suffering from Alzheimer’s disease require increasing assistance with basic activities of daily living (ADLs) such as eating, bathing, dressing, and toileting. These individuals eventually need around-the-clock care. Because of that, their family caregivers find themselves especially overwhelmed. When caregivers feel they can no longer cope, patients are more likely to be placed in institutional settings such as nursing homes.

Costs of Nursing Home Placement
According to the Alzheimer’s Association, in 2014 the direct costs to American society of caring for those with Alzheimer's will total an estimated $214 billion, including $150 billion in costs to Medicare and Medicaid. Alzheimer's will cost an estimated $1.2 trillion (in today's dollars) in 2050.

Medicare covers short-term skilled care up to 100 days the first 20 days are covered at 100% and from day 21 to day 100 the patient (or their family) has a daily co-pay. Medicaid is a state/federal program that does pay the cost of nursing home care for eligible individuals, however the patient must meet income and resource requirements. 

Families’ and patients’ total out of pocket costs for nursing home care in 2014 is estimated at $36 billion.

Image Source: Alzheimer’s Association

If we can delay the nursing home placement of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia, can substantial money be saved? If Alzheimer’s and dementia patients are aging in place longer, doesn’t that mean more stress (and its inherent problems) for family caregivers?

States are seeking to provide real and meaningful support for patients and their caregivers. Many states are looking to increase their funding for community-based programs to support individuals and families facing the challenges of Alzheimer’s disease, and in doing so, significantly reduce their state’s Medicaid costs. Recently, Minnesota determined it could save almost $1 billion in Medicaid over the next decade if the state adopted a new dementia caregiver support model, according to a study published Monday in the journal Health Affairs. That support model was introduced by a program called New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI).

New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI) is a counseling and support intervention for spouse caregivers that is intended to improve the well-being of caregivers and delay the nursing home placement of patients with Alzheimer's disease. The program also aims to help spouse caregivers mobilize their social support network and help them better adapt to their caregiving role.

The program consists of four components:

  • Two individual counseling sessions of 1 to 3 hours tailored to each caregiver's specific situation,
  • Four family counseling sessions with the primary caregiver and family members selected by that caregiver,
  • Encouragement to participate in weekly, locally available support groups after participation in the intervention, and
  • Ad hoc counseling, counseling provided by telephone to caregivers and families whenever needed to help them deal with crises and the changing nature of their relative's symptoms.The program is delivered by counselors with advanced degrees in social work or allied professions.

In addition, many states are seeking increased funding for the Alzheimer’s Disease Community Assistance Program (AlzCAP), which provides educational initiatives and caregiver respite programs. Paired with funded public awareness campaigns, the hope is that by addressing and getting in front of the challenges of the family caregiver, the length of time before placing a care recipient into a nursing home setting can be extended, saving everyone a lot of money.

What would help you, as a caregiver, reduce your stress and help care for a family member longer? If you or someone you know is overwhelmed with the task of senior caregiving, Caregiverlist® suggests you consider the possibility of hiring respite care from a quality senior home care agency.

New Chicken Soup Tackles Alzheimer's, Dementia Care

The numbers on Alzheimer’s disease and dementia are staggering. More than 5 million American seniors are living with the Alzheimer’s disease or dementia. More than 60 percent of Alzheimer's and dementia caregivers are women. In 2013, 15.5 million caregivers provided an estimated 17.7 billion hours of unpaid care valued at more than $220 billion. It’s no wonder that the publishers at Chicken Soup for the Soul saw the need to provide support and encouragement with their trademark inspirational stories, culled from those at the front line of caregiving.

Chicken Soup for the Soul: Living with Alzheimer's & Other Dementias: 101 Stories of Caregiving, Coping and Compassion by Amy Newmark is publisher and editor-in-chief of Chicken Soup for the Soul. Angela Timashenka Geiger is Chief Strategy Officer of the Alzheimer’s Association, the world’s leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s care, support, and research. After sifting through thousands of admissions, they chose 101 of the best stories for their readers.

Chicago area resident Carrie Jackson became a caregiver to her father, Henry George Jackson Jr. while he was suffering with Alzheimer’s disease. She submitted some of her stories for publication and her essay describing a nursing home visit was chosen for inclusion. Life Matters Media was given permission to share an excerpt. Because of this experience (her father passed away in 2012,) Ms. Jackson in now a certified dementia practitioner.

Chicken Soup for the Soul always asks for story and poem submissions for upcoming titles, as they did for Chicken Soup for the Soul, Family Caregiving by Joan Lunden and Amy Newmark. That collection offered support and encouragement for family caregivers of all ages, including the “sandwich” generation caring for a family member while raising their children. Stories are by and about those who are both giving and receiving care.

The Chicken Soup for the Soul, Changing Your World One Story at a Time series began in 1993 by founders and motivational speakers Jack Canfield and Mark Victor Hansen. They had a simple idea: that people could help each other by sharing stories about their lives. With over 250 titles and over 100 million books sold to date in the U.S. and Canada, the Chicken Soup for the Soul series continues to publish first-person stories to “soothe and provide comfort, just like their grandmothers’ cooking.”

Anyone who may have gained experience as a caregiver while caring for a loved one with memory loss may consider becoming a professional senior caregiver by receiving caregiver training and certification. They can then submit a job application to be connected with hiring companies in their area.

Chicken Soup for the Soul: Living with Alzheimer’s & Other Dementias will be released April 22, 2014. You can pre-order here. All royalties from the sale of the book will go to the Alzheimer’s Association.

For the latest numbers regarding Alzheimer’s disease, watch the following video from the Alzheimer's Association: Alzheimer's Disease Facts and Figures 2014

 

Seth Rogen Talks Alzheimer's to Congress

Seth Rogen, comedic actor and self-described “lazy man-child” testified before a Senate hearing on Alzheimer’s research last month. His testimony, which was deeply heartfelt yet engagingly funny, tackled the need for more funding, more research and the need to de-stigmafy Alzheimer’s and other memory loss diseases.

Rogen gained first-hand experience with Alzheimer’s disease through his now- wife, Lauren Miller’s mother, who was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s in her 50s. By the age 60, Rogen told the committee, his mother-in-law "After forgetting who she and her loved ones were...then forgot how to speak, feed herself, dress herself and go to the bathroom herself”

In an effort to raise funds, he and his wife established Hilarity for Charity, comic and music events designed to raise money and awareness of Alzheimer’s and other memory diseases among the younger generation. They also started HFC U, a nationwide program that encourages and supports college groups to “throw their very own Hilarity for Charity events to raise awareness and much needed funds for fighting Alzheimer’s Disease.”

“Americans whisper the word ‘Alzheimer’s’ because their government whispers the word ‘Alzheimer’s,’ and although a whisper is better than the silence that the Alzheimer’s community has been facing for decades, it’s still not enough,” Rogen said. “I dream of a day when my charity is no longer necessary and I can go back to being the lazy, self-involved man-child I was meant to be.” You can watch Seth Rogen’s opening statement (provided by C-SPAN3 coverage) below.

Golden Globe Winners 2015: The Year of the Nursing Home Sitcom?

The Golden Globes 2014 are done — Bye Tina Fey! So long Amy Poehler! See you next year! — and I’m sure networks are already thinking about which shows and stars might make it to the red carpet in 2015.

This year, Brooklyn Nine-Nine and its star, Andy Samberg took home Golden Globes for Best TV Comedy and Best Actor in a TV Comedy, respectively. Don’t get me wrong, I love the show and watch it whenever I can but really, hasn’t the old “detective precinct” comedy been done before? (I’m looking at you, Barney Miller.)

If you want an original workplace comedy, well, place, I’d like to present a couple of comedies I’ve discovered recently.

Approximately 1.6 million Americans over the age of 65 live in institutions such as nursing homes. 10,000 baby boomers turn 65 every day and they can expect to live to 84 years old. This means that chances are, someone you know, or you yourself, may wind up in a nursing home or extended care facility. An aging population will increase demand, but costs and limited funding will make it difficult to provide the needed level of care. Now, doesn’t that just scream comedic situations?

The Netflix Original Series Derek stars Ricky Gervais in a “comedy-drama about a loyal nursing home caretaker who sees only the good in his quirky co-workers as they struggle against prejudice and shrinking budgets to care for their elderly residents.” Derek is a simple, sweet man who loves his job at Broad Hill nursing home, along with its residents. His best friends are his co-workers, including the nursing home manager. “Best of all is Hannah (Kerry Godliman),” says Derek. “She’s the manager here and she’s the nicest person in the world. She cares for everyone.” Hannah is a model senior caregiver. “People think care means 3 meals a day and a bed. But it means caring. And if you don’t care, you shouldn’t be in the job.” According to Derek, no one in his life treats him as well as the elderly in his charge. Even as he cuts their toenails or helps them manage through traffic, he considers himself the luckiest man in the world. Mr. Gervais is all but unrecognizable from his role as the abrasive David Brent in the UK’s The Office. Although filmed in the same mockumentary style, Derek has a broad sweetness that The Office certainly didn’t have.

In Derek, “Kindness is Magic”, but this trailer is NSFW.

HBO’s Getting On, is based on the British sitcom of the same name. The creators of Big Love present this new comedy set in The Billy Barnes Extended Care Unit of a fictional Long Beach hospital where many of the female patients suffer from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Chicago veteran stage actress and Emmy winner Laurie Metcalf (Roseanne) is beleaguered Dr. Jenna James, Alex Borstein is eager-to-please nurse Dawn Forchette, and Niecy Nash is Denise “Didi” Ortley, the elderly caregiver I’d like to hire for myself, right now.

More than anything, this show gives a great and honest glimpse into the duties and responsibilities of a caregiver a long term care setting, dealing with red tape and always in fear of losing its Medicare reimbursement. In a hilariously literal game of “telephone”, nurses try to translate an elderly woman’s Cambodian with the translation department. Nurses are overworked and underappreciated and have to fill out the proper paperwork before simply doing what is needed.

“They say extended care is boring, which it is not. It is totally where the action is,” Dawn tells Didi, while bemoaning the lack of testosterone in the department. This is a sitcom that doesn’t shirk away from showing all the difficulties inherent in the eldercare industry, from the job of toileting to the responsibility of delivering news of the death of an 87 year old “baby sister”.

Check out this trailer. It too is NSFW.

Both are worth a watch for a true look at the life of caregivers and the elderly who rely upon them.

Have you seen either of these shows? Do you think they are realistic looks at caregivers and the caregiving industry?

The Alzheimer's Store Provides Quality Products for Families and Caregivers

Caregivers for Alzheimer’s patients or those with dementia or memory loss deal with a special set of caregiving needs. That’s something that our friends at The Alzheimer’s Store know all too well. They’ve made it their mission to bring to the senior care market a variety of products to make caring for those living with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia easier and make the Alzheimer’s years just a little more safe and comfortable. Here, they discuss a popular product that makes life easier.

It’s Easier Than Ever to Celebrate Time with Loved Ones

Time is so precious. We often take it for granted. That at the fact that we’re naturally aware of the day and time or can easily find out at any given moment. It’s not so easy for Alzheimer’s patients. Caregivers and family members of those with Alzheimer’s are very familiar with the questions: “What time is it?” and “What day is it?” It can be taxing on both you and them.

Since our goal at The Alzheimer’s Store (ALZSTORE.COM) is to help ease the stress in caring for loved ones, we feature a wall clock that is large enough for Alzheimer’s patients to see from all areas of the room. Knowing the day and time reassures the patient and puts them more at ease, which in turn relieves stress for both caregivers and family members.

This high quality precision clock displays the time, day of the week and date clearly and automatically. It has a sweeping hand, as Alzheimer’s patients do not recognize digital, and a large day date and month. Both at home and in facilities, those who struggle with Alzheimer’s can take pride and comfort in knowing the correct day and date with this excellent reminder.


Wall Clock with Day & Date

We know caring for someone you love with this disease can be a roller coaster of emotions. Alzheimer’s affects more than five million people worldwide and is the nation’s sixth-leading cause of death. In fact, my grandfather George was inspiration behind our dedication and commitment to helping others with Alzheimer’s. Nothing gives us more satisfaction that helping others care for loved ones; it helps us honor our grandfather’s memory.

We can’t say enough about the positive feedback we’ve been getting on this top-selling product. The Alzheimer's Store's continuously searches to offer quality products at the most affordable rate and we have not been able to find a more reliable timepiece. If you’ve purchased the clock or plan to, we’d love to hear your feedback! Email us and share your story at brittany@alzstore.com.

Senior caregivers may also find online caregiver training and apply for a senior caregiving job near them, as more companion caregivers are always needed to assist seniors with memory loss.

Log in