Senior Caregiver Employee Need Will Keep Growing with America's Changing Social Demographics

Senior caregivers are in demand. Why? Because not only are we living longer lives but our social demographics have changed as our culture has advanced to give women more rights, beginning in the 1970's. This means we are just now entering an era where in addition to the fact that the Baby Boomer generation has a lot of people, the rights of women have changed the fabric of families and made them often unavailable to provide caregiving.  Technology has allowed us to stay in touch with family members from anywhere but we will always need a human caregiver to provide for the physical and emotional care.  We will always need real live humans to perform caregiving. And we need to prepare to find more people to be trained to work as senior caregivers.

Did you know that prior to 1974 women in the U.S.A. could not get a credit card?  They could not run the Boston Marathon until 1972. Prior to 1978 women could be fired just for being pregnant. The Equal Opportunity Act of 1974 gave women the right to apply for credit (and credit cards) and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 allowed women to keep their jobs while they were "expecting" a child. 

Remember when nobody was pregnant, they were just "expecting"? I remember a family dinner one Sunday when my father mentioned a neighbor was "expecting" and my brother said "expecting what?".  Exactly. We can talk about it now. Our society's culture continues to evolve and this fact leads to one of the largest reasons for the need for more professional senior caregivers. The large number of Baby Boomers (10,000 turn age 65 each day) and advances in medicine are just part of the reason we need more caregivers.  We need to recognize these facts in order to attract more workers to the industry of senior care or we will be faced with a shortage of professional caregivers to work in our nursing homes, assisted living communities and for licensed senior home care agencies.

Caregiver job openings are a constant in metropolitan cities nationwide, as well as in rural communities. Senior care needs are emotional as well as physical.  Aging can be a tough journey. Caregivers are needed to make living longer, while living safely, possible. Nurses and care managers are also needed to manage the care and coordinate with family members and medical professionals.

Retired seniors may also want to consider working part-time as a paid caregiver as more and more paid caregivers will be needed to keep up with the changes in America's social demographics.

Americans are also marrying later in life as marriages have evolved to be less about economic necessities and more about a union of shared passions and shared incomes. This means adult children are also more likely to be able to assist with paying for senior care services, if required, in order to maintain quality care and limit family drama that can escalate with the stress of caregiving (no, the Kardashian's are not the only family with interesting dynamics).

And this need is only going to continue to increase because of another factor: sandwich generation parents.  Women are waiting until they are older to begin motherhood which means they are more likely to have young children or school age children to care for and are not available to care for their parents.

Caregiver jobs will continue to increase, based on these simple social demographic facts. This means that the generations following the Baby Boomer will also continue to need caregivers. Perhaps both college students and retirees will be recruited to work part-time as senior caregivers to assist us to keep up with the demand for trained nursing aides and professional home health aides to work as caregivers.

See below from our friends at Pew Research:

In the 1990's

13% of newborns were to Teenager Mothers

10% of newborns were to Women Age 35+ 

41% of New Mothers had Some College Education


In 2008

9% of newborns were to Teenager Mothers

14% of newborns were to Women Age 35+ 

54% of New Mothers had Some College Education

This means we must recruit more caring individuals to be professional senior caregivers.  The Caregiver Training University assists anyone to learn the basic caregiver training skills through an online caregiver training course. There are many techniques that can make caregiving a more enjoyable experience, from understanding how to safely transfer a senior from their bed to a chair to a toilet, for example, to learning activities that can be helpful for a senior experiencing memory loss.

We will always need senior caregivers, no matter how much technology advances. Senior caregivers may submit their job application on Caregiverlist to be considered by hiring companies in their area as senior care companies hire as many as 5 to 6 new caregivers each week, in order to keep up with demand.

And as today kick's off baseball's World Series, a salute to another thing that will never change - the sound of the "crack of the bat"! Good luck to the Kansas City Royal's and New York Met's. 







Caregiver Stress Relief: Enjoying the Colors of Fall

Crisp air and sunshine bring out the vibrance in autumn's colors. This week's photo was taken in Lincoln Park in Chicago, Illinois. Caregiverlisinvites you to enjoy the photo and share it with loved ones. At Caregiverlist we know the realities of caregiver stress. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for your hard work and caring for our seniors. Please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.  We hope you have a great week.


"Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall."  -F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby


California Senior Home Care Agency Training Requirement Regulation Begins in January 2016

Senior Home Care Agencies in California will be required to document the training they provide for professional senior caregivers based on the state of California's Assembly Bill 1217 which requires a minimum of 5 hours of entry-level training prior to presence with a client and 5 hours of training annually.

As more seniors are choosing to age-in-place in their own home, more states are establishing rules and regulations to insure both the seniors and the caregivers are protected and receive the insurance benefits and payroll taxes, as required by law. One of the benefits for caregivers working for senior home care agencies includes the payment of their Social Security, Unemployment and Worker's Compensation insurances.  This way senior caregivers are protected should the client pass away or get better and in the event they were to have an injury on the job. In addition, senior caregivers employed by senior home care agencies know that they are paying into all payroll taxes, including Social Security benefits and will be able to collect on this benefit for their own retirement.

California senior home care agencies can easily comply with this training mandate by providing an online training program. Caregiver Training University provides training meeting the state department of health requirements nationwide.  Individual caregivers may also purchase training and be added to the caregiver certification registry on Caregiverlist.  

Private duty senior home care agencies may request a sample caregiver training and a demo by contacting: susan@caregiverlist.com or calling 312-669-8821.



California Senior Caregiver Training Created to Protect Seniors and Caregivers

California joins several other states, such as Illinois, New Jersey, Washington and Florida to create specific laws to regulate senior caregiver training and the background check process for professional senior caregivers. California's law, titled the "Home Care Services Consumer Protection Act of 2013" was officially signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown in October of 2013 and enforcement of some of the specifics of the law, such as caregiver training, begins in January of 2016.

Senior care companies needing digital training to meet this requirement may contact Caregiverlist at 312-669-8821 for information and a custom digital training resource.

California Assembly Bill 1217 Requires:

  • Licenses Customized for Home Care Organizations as Businesses
  • New Home Care Aide Registry to List all Professional Caregivers Working as Home Care Aide
  • Home Care Aides Must Renew Registration Every 2 Years
The new guidelines mandated by California's 1217 bill has been named the "Home Care Services Consumer Protection Act".
The California State Department of Social Services will administer and enforce the requirements and this is why the legislation delays enforcement until January of 2016, in order to build the bureaucracy around it.

California senior home care agencies will now have their business license a bit more customized for senior home care, by requiring:

  • General and Professional Liability Insurance in the amount of at least $1 million dollars per occurrence and $3 million dollars in the aggregate
  • Worker's Compensation Insurance 
  • List of Registered Home Care Aide Workers and Validation Aides 
  • Initial License Fee for 24-Months (2 Years) for a New Home Care Services Company
  • 2-Year Renewal Fee based on Number of Full-Time Employees (FTE's)
  • TB Test for Home Care Aides within 7 Days After Employment and then Every 2 Years
  • 5 Hours of Entry-Level Training for Newly Employed Senior Home Care Aides
  • 5 Hours of Annual Training for Employed Home Care Aides
The California Home Care Services Consumer Protection Act identifies the specific caregiver training required for senior home care aides in section 1796.44 of the legislation under Article 8 titled Affiliated Home Care Aides.

As 10,000 Americans turn age 65 each day, and life expectancy continues to climb upwards, senior care professionals have predicted that more seniors will prefer to age-in-place in their own home or in the home of an adult child.  Hospitals have also indicated that they believe that within the next decade, much of their care will be monitored in the home using technology to monitor vital signs and performing an equivalent of a Skype video call to allow the nurses and doctors to engage with the patient and daily intervals.

California's senior caregiver training law will most likely be joined by additional states soon.  The caregiver training and caregiver registry are the most valuable aspects of this legislation for seniors as most all senior home care agencies already followed the majority of the guidelines this new law requires.

The California Senior Caregiver will also now be called a Home Care Aide and this designation can be slightly different and called a "personal care aide" or "certified caregiver" as well.

Caregivers working in California most likely have already been trained in the skills mandated by Assembly Bill Number 1217. However, these caregivers will need to now have annual training consisting of 5 hours to show they are maintaining these skills.
Annual California caregiver training must relate to core competencies outlined by the legislation as:

  • Clients' Rights and Safety
  • How to Provide for and Respond to a Client's Daily Living Needs
  • How to Report, Prevent and Detect Abuse and Neglect
  • How to Assist a Client with Personal Hygiene and other Home Care Services
  • How to Safely Transport a Client (if Transportation is Required)

This caregiver training may be completed through an online program.  The Caregiver Training University Basic Caregiver Training does provide training meeting the California home care aide training requirements. Senior care companies in California can also subscribe to the senior home care agency caregiver training portal to easily train their caregiving staff and provide easy-to-use reporting. As more senior caregivers are already needed, anyone interested in working as a professional caregiver may take the online home care aide training course and apply for a caregiving job to be considered by professional senior care companies in their area who are always hiring.  Need easy-to-administer professional caregiver training? Email susan@caregiverlist.com or call Caregiverlist at 312-669-8821.





California Governor Makes Assisted Suicide Legal

Senior caregivers working as professional caregivers can share many stories of seniors and their families who have struggled with when to embrace hospice care and accept the process of dying.  Aging gracefully comes with accepting mental, emotional and physical health realities that do not arrive wrapped in gracefulness.  

America's seniors receive either Medicare health care or Medicaid (for low-income seniors with few assets). If a senior has been diagnosed with a terminal condition with two years or less to live, they may accept hospice care.  Hospice care respects the dignity of the senior to maintain their comfort as they journey through their illness, accepting their body will eventually be unable to function without assistance and accepting that they do not want additional assistance to remain alive.

As advances in medicine and technology are allowing us to live longer, the new questions arising are focused on how do we want these longer years to be?  The recent best-selling book "Being Mortal" by Atul Gawande, a medical doctor (and excellent writer), focuses on how we should begin the conversations with our loved ones on how we want to age.

California's law joins the law in the state of Oregon to give their residents the right to "death with dignity".  This week Governor Jerry Brown stepped forward to sign the bill his state's assembly had approved.  The governor accepted the opposition of some in order to respect the right for mentally competent adults who have been diagnosed with a terminal illness with six months or less to live to have the choice to accept lethal prescriptions.

Hospice caregivers who have been with someone dying can share stories of hearing the death rattle noises coming from a terminal patient as they lose their ability to swallow.  Doctors, nurses and hospice professionals who support the death with dignity movement bring an approach to care that supports caring for someone as they are dying by providing comfort, just as we try to provide comfort when caring for those who will recover from an illness.

Barbara Coombs Lee, a nurse who serves as the president of Compassion & Choices, shares the story of Brittany Maynard, who through her terminal cancer diagnosis stepped up to be the force behind the movement to change the laws in California to allow for residents to choose to die with dignity.  She wanted her family caregivers to know that she had planned ahead for a dignified death.

Brittany's video had 100 million views.  You can learn more about Compassion & Choices initiative to support death with dignity in additional states in the U.S.A. 

Peaceful Evening on the Pacific for Caregiver Stress Relief

The beach, with daylight fading away, and waves crashing, is a beautiful and relaxing place. This week's photo was taken on the Pacific coast of Nicaragua. We invite you to take a moment to relax and enjoy the photo and inspirational quote and share them with loved ones. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for your hard work and the care you provide for our seniors. More caregivers are always needed as seniors in America are living longer. You can learn more about becoming a senior caregiver and apply for a job near you. Have a great week.


"Smell the sea, and feel the sky. Let your soul and spirit fly."  -Van Morrison

Super Better Game Helps You Get and Stay Stronger

“I’m game”!  What thoughts go through your mind when someone says this?  If thoughts of excitement, exhilaration, challenge, friendship and the thrill of winning come to mind, then you are like the majority of people who enjoy playing a good game. All of these positive thoughts have now been studied and confirmed as truly brain changing. 


Jane McGonigal, a senior researcher at the Institute for the Future has developed a game that assists anyone, including senior caregivers, to move into the gaming mindset to feel better and achieve goals in their daily life.  She has a new book, titled Super Better, along with a free SuperBetter App to allow everyone to step into the gaming mindset and enjoy the resulting benefits.

Jane visited Chicago this week to talk about her book, her research and the free Super Better App at her new office in Chicago (just a couple blocks from Caregiverlist, Inc. at the Chicago Merchandise Mart).

If you thought playing games was not a good use of your time, Jane’s research may surprise you. She now has research studies to back up her findings that your brain does change when you are in the gaming mindset.  Her current focus is on those recovering from traumatic brain injuries or experiencing mental illness such as depression or addiction.  Her own experience recovering from a concussion led her to build the Super Better game and the free Super Better App.  

You are stronger than you know.
You are surrounded by potential allies.
You are the hero of your own story.

By being gameful you can combat extreme stress and personal challenge and thrive and this is what both Jane's book and game will teach you how to do.

How does this work?

Have you ever helped lift heavy furniture from one room to the next? When doing so, you are thinking about how to leverage the furniture in conjunction with the other person assisting with the lifting and you communicate on how you will shift the piece of furniture without damaging it or the walls and floor and without hurting yourself or the other person. As you do this, your brains are "in synch". The same thing happens when you are playing a video game with someone else, or any game. However, this is most effective when playing a game with a friend or family member. The brain chemistry, so to speak, truly changes and delivers more positive emoticons, as we might say. The vagus nerve, for instance, connects the mind to many important organs in the body and mediates the relationship between emotions and physical health and is improved when you are immersed in a game.

The SuperBetter App presents a game that will result in the player being able to stay strong, motivated and optimistic, even in the face of difficult obstacles. Playing SuperBetter allows players to become capable of getting through any tough situation and more likely to achieve their goals. Results have been proven by playing for just 10 minutes a day. A nurse shared a story of assisting a patient who was battling depression. After being given a prescription for anti-depressants, the person returned for their check-up visit showing signs of improvement. However, it turned out they were unable to afford to buy the medications and instead played the free SuperBetter App game and said that this had helped them to step out of their depressed state.

McGonigal has organized the ways we think and act when we play games into 7 actions that contribute to post-traumatic and post-ecstatic growth when implemented:

  1. Adopt a Challenge Mindset

  2. Seek out Whatever Makes you Stronger and Happier

  3. Strive for Psychological Flexibility

  4. Take Committed Action

  5. Cultivate Connectedness

  6. Find the Heroic Story

  7. Learn the Skill of Benefit Finding


The 7 Rules to Live By from the SuperBetter Method:

  1. Challenge yourself

  2. Collect and activate power-ups

  3. Find and battle the bad guys

  4. Seek out and complete quests

  5. Recruit your allies

  6. Adopt a secret identity

  7. Go for an epic win


Studies also show that those who are caring for others who are experiencing mental illness also find benefits when playing SuperBetter.  As seniors can be at high risk for alcoholism and depression, senior caregivers can add game playing to their tool kit and now know that research backs up the benefits of being a game player.

Reaching for the Sky

The magic of the mountains is that sometimes they can take you above the clouds. This week's photo features peaks of the Bavarian Alps, taken in the town of Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. Caregiverlisinvites you to enjoy the photo and share it with loved ones. At Caregiverlist we know the realities of caregiver stress. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for your hard work and caring for our seniors. Please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.  We hope you have a great week.


"It isn't the mountains ahead to climb that wear you out;  it's the pebble in your shoe." 

-Muhammad Ali

Sunshine and Sunflowers: Stress Relief Photo

Bright yellow sunflowers are one of summer's cheerful delights. This week's photo was taken at the Greenmarket in Lincoln Park, Chicago, Illinois. Caregiverlisinvites you to enjoy the photo and share it with loved ones. At Caregiverlist we know the realities of caregiver stress. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for your hard work and caring for our seniors. Please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools.  We hope you have a great week. 


"Not the sun or summer alone, but every hour and season yields its tribute of delight."  

 -Ralph Waldo Emerson

Caregiver Career Advancement With LinkedIn App

LinkedIn offers caregivers a chance to connect with people and organizations that they may be interested in working with in a professional online space. The LinkedIn app offers caregivers the ability to make connections, participate in group discussions and look for local organizations on the go. 

When new users download the LinkedIn app, they need to either link their existing LinkedIn profile to the app or create a new profile. To create a LinkedIn profile, new users can either upload their resume for the computer to autofill information or they can simply go through and manually type in some details of their work history. If you need assistance building a resume, use the Caregiverlist Resume Builder. In addition to work history, users can also list professional training on their profile, such as Caregiverlist Basic Training

Then, LinkedIn gives the option to upload a photo. Placing a picture on your profile provides a nice touch, just remember to use a professional looking headshot. If you don't have an existing photo that meets that criteria, put on a nice shirt and ask a friend to snap a few pictures of you against a neutral background. 

Once users have entered their profile information, they are taken to the newsfeed which serves as the homepage within the app. Users can see what their connections have shared lately on this feed. A menu on the left side of the app pops out when users click the LinkedIn logo displayed in the top bar. It's not obvious that this will bring up a menu, but once users click on it options for Jobs, People You May Know, Connections, Companies, etc. will appear. 



One of the features of LinkedIn gives applicants the ability to look at a company profile with snapshot information about the size of a company, their overall company summary and current staff. Say you search for a position at a care agency in our Caregiving Career Center and would like to learn more about the company. By going to LinkedIn and searching the name of the company, you can pull up their profile and read more about them. Plus, information about a recruiter who works for that company might be included on their profile so you can contact them directly for more details on the position. 

The more people you connect with on LinkedIn, the more opportunities you create to be introduced to someone professionally. Say you have a connection with a fellow caregiver who used to work for an agency where you now decided to apply for a job. LinkedIn will show you that your connection is also connected to someone who works at that agency, and you can request that they introduce you to that person for online networking. 

Groups on the LinkedIn app also provide more networking. Search caregiving and you will find local and national scale groups devoted to caregiver issues and networking. 

The LinkedIn app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 


Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discover additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 




-Paige Krzysko



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