Are Brain Games Vital to Great Senior Care?

Whenever my older sister misplaced things, or forgot a word or phrase, or walked into a room and couldn’t recollect why, she was fond of saying that she was having a “senior moment.” While it’s true that memory and processing speed can be challenged as we age, there are some aspects of the cognitive mind that are sharper in the elderly than in the young. Older people have a depth and breadth of knowledge and experience from which to draw. Decision-making processes can be stronger and certainly, the elderly probably have better language skills than their younger counterparts. But, as with the rest of the body, the mind should exercise or face possible atrophy.

According to Marbles, the Brain Store, the brain is malleable and can continue to create more neurons and neuronal connections, even older adults can exercise their brains and improve areas that they may not be as sharp in. SharpBrains, an independent research and advisory company on brain fitness, concurs. Cofounder and CEO Alvaro Fernandez states in an article on Social Work Today, that brain fitness is becoming a standard in older adult residential facilities, with more than 700 facilities in the United States alone installing computerized cognitive training programs since 2007.

Although I love computers, I wanted to find some good old-fashioned offline games to help increase brain strength. With that in mind (pun intended), I’ve enlisted the help of my local Marbles to give caregivers an idea of some games they can play with their seniors. Here are some of the suggestions from their website:

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Marbles Good Thinking Kit – This portable kit boasts over 100 activities to help improve memory, critical thinking, coordination, visual perception and word skills.

 

Pengoloo – Pengoloo is as much fun as one of penguins’ favorite pastimes: sliding down icy hills on their bellies! The best part? This charming game works your memory without you even realizing it. (The greatest brain health games are sneaky like that.)

 

Rush Hour – This multi-award winner is one of Marbles’ bestsellers; my kids love it too. Perhaps it’s the fun of setting up the game board based on pictures of traffic jams and then plotting your escape as you slide cars and trucks out of the way. Although it looks like a kid’s game, it’s challenging to even the best adult puzzlers.

 

 

 

Sherlock Deluxe – As Sherlock searches for clues, players are asked to recall objects on a facedown card. If the player is correct, the card is turned face-up and Sherlock moves on. If Sherlock lands on a face-up card, the player gets to keep that card. The first player to collect six cards wins. For adults, the game just might help you remember that you left your keys in the freezer.

 

And because we are not always around or available to play, a good solitary brain game continues to be:

Little Black & White Book of Crosswords – Of course, there areother crossword puzzles out there. But The New York Times Crossword is the gold standard. The bible. The one that all others are measured against. Now you can get 200 of these brilliant bad boys in The New York Times Little Black (and White) Book of Crosswords from puzzle master Will Shortz.

Caregiverlist® suggests that the next time you think of healthy aging and senior caregiving, remember to add some brain exercises. Along with physical activity and good nutrition, it will help you help your senior to age well.

Sun Safety Especially Important for Seniors

Ah, June! Finally, the cold, dreary days of winter are gone and the summer sun warms our bones. Last weekend, city pools were full to capacity. This is perfect weather — the recent numbing cold weather is a just a memory, and we well know that unbearable heat that will have us scrambling for air conditioning is right around the corner. But for right now, we will take advantage of these halcyon days and spend every available moment outdoors.

Before caregivers head outside with their seniors, it’s important to know that skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the U.S. In fact, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation, the odds of developing skin cancer rise as you age; in fact, between 40 and 50 percent of Americans who live to age 65 will have at least one skin cancer.

Why is it that those over 70 years old have the highest incidence of skin cancer of any age group? I remember the days when baby oil was used as suntan lotion. A recent study conducted in Germany concluded that repeated sunburns during a lifetime increased the chances of melanoma later in life, writes Susan Evans, MD.

Tanning beds, introduced into the U.S. in 1979, were touted as the epitome of health and fitness. Tanning salons became hugely popular. However, we now know that using a tanning bed will increase your chances of getting skin cancer. The American Academy of Dermatology says studies have shown people who have been exposed to UV rays from indoor tanning have a 59% increase of developing melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. And just recently, the FDA reclassified them as "moderate-risk devices" instead of "low-risk". (The Skin Cancer Foundation, along with a host of other experts, feels that the reclassification doesn’t go far enough.)

But all is not lost. Damage can be mitigated and we can safeguard ourselves and our seniors from destroying any more precious skin cells. The following precautions can keep keep skin damage at a minimum and reduce the chance of future melanoma:

  • Wear waterproof sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  • Cover up with broad brimmed hats, protective clothing, and UV-filtering sunglasses.
  • Seek shade instead of direct sunlight, especially during 10am and 4pm, when the sun is strongest.

In the meantime, seniors should arrange for regular skin cancer screenings with their doctors and educate themselves on what types of skin changes for which to be vigilant. Caregivers should also know the indicators of melanoma and be on the lookout for any skin anomalies.



Caregiverlist® invites you to learn more about helping seniors age well with Caregiverlist® Basic Training, powered by Caregiver Training University. The 8-hour training course provides easy-to-access online caregiver training for professional and family caregivers and meets senior caregiver orientation training requirements for many states.

German Nursing Homes to Try 3D Printed Food for Seniors

Senior caregivers can find it quite challenging to keep the elderly well-nourished, especially if the senior has problems with chewing and swallowing. A steady diet of baby food-like mush can make seniors dread their next meal. Dealing with the challenges of feeding those seniors can lead to caregiver stress.

So, the European Union is funding a consortium of five European countries along with 14 companies called PERFORMANCE (which stands for PERsonalised FOod using Rapid MAnufacturing for the Nutrition of elderly ConsumErs), to help develop 3D-printed “smoothfood” to create a more appetizing-looking meal.

German company Biozoon created Smoothfood, in which deconstructed foods that are safe to ingest without chewing are reconstructed to look like conventional meals by using plant-based solidifying agents and poured into food-shaped silicon molds. While the food retains its shape on the plate, it completely dissolves in the mouth, making it safe for those with chewing and swallowing impairments.

Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing food, affects as many as 15 million Americans and according to the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR), over 60,000 Americans die from complications associated with swallowing dysfunctions each year. Many times, victims of stroke find themselves unable to chew and swallow regular food.Currently, those seniors have no choice but to eat a variety of pureed foods, much like baby food. Needless to say, a constant diet of unappealing and uninteresting food has been shown to cause a loss of appetite and lead to malnutrition.

Nursing homes and assisted living facilities are already overtaxed and overburdened with senior care, so the objective of the PERFORMANCE project is to utilize new processing approaches and tailor-made technologies for the use by small and medium sized (SME) food producers to produce personalised food for the frail elderly European consumer, thereby improving the quality of life.

Over 1,000 retirement homes in Germany have already implemented the smoothfood concept according to Wired UK. The PERFORMANCE project is hoping to take that idea and, by applying automated 3D printing technology, make it easier and more affordable to use on a broader scale by nursing homes and assisted living facilities.

But how does that food taste? Sandra Forstner, the project manager at Biozoon spoke to food blog Munchies about the taste of 3-D printed food. “The food tastes like normal food. It is made from fresh ingredients, so the taste doesn’t change. One of our goals is not to change the flavor; the texturizing system doesn’t change it.”

Senior Housing Building Boom: Too Much Too Soon?

I am part of a very substantial population of the United States known as Baby Boomers. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, 76.4 million American children were born post-World War II, between the years 1945 and 1964, making up almost 40% of the American population. As much as we would love to age in place, the fact is that if we see 80+ years old, we will need some sort of help with Activities of Daily Living, and the cold, hard truth is that a lot of us will receive that help in some sort of assisted living community.

It’s no wonder that many real estate developers are banking on building for a significant niche market. Home and commercial real estate building in 2014 point to a post-recession recovery. However, are those developing housing for the elderly building too much too soon?

Analysts say that a glut in the supply of senior housing is destined to hurt hurt health-care real estate investment trusts (REITs). Bloomberg News reported that the jump in supply is forecast to cut growth in senior-housing net operating income to 1.8 percent in 2015 and 1.4 percent in 2016 from 3.3 percent this year, according to Green Street Advisors Inc. These projections have translated into a 17 percent fall in the Bloomberg health-care REIT index during the last 12 months.

Brookdale Senior Living Inc. (BKD:US), is buying competitor Emeritus Corp. (ESC:US) for about $1.4 billion, Green Street Advisors told Bloomberg, making it the biggest owner of senior properties, with 1,161 senior care facilities in 46 states.

While the supply of senior care communities is increasing, the over-85 population is projected to increase to just 7 million by 2020. Senior housing won’t be in full swing for a few more years, when the nation’s “oldest old” could number as many as 31 million in 2050, although Jacob Gehl, managing director and founding partner of Blueprint Healthcare Real Estate Advisors, a brokerage and advisory firm in Chicago, told Bloomberg that peak demand is projected to be 15 to 20 years away.

It will be interesting to see how these new properties compete by way of staff, amenities, and senior housing costs. It will also be interesting to see if the trend in preferring to age at home with the assistance of quality home care continues. A lot can happen to the senior care landscape in 20 years.

Caregiverlist® would love to know about you and your family's projected needs. Where do you see yourself living when you are in need of assistance? Are you hoping your family will care for you? Do you see yourself moving into some sort of assisted living well before you absolutely need it?

Advanced Style: Celebrating Over-Sixty Chic

I’ll admit it — I’ve been known to occasionally fall down the rabbit hole of online fashion sites. I’ll start at LE CATCH, drift over to FashionIndie, then lose a few hours on The Sartorialist. But because the nature of my job is to acquaint myself with all things senior and elder-related, I’ve always held a very soft spot in my heart for Ari Seth Cohen and his amazing New York street-style blog, Advanced Style.

The Advanced Style blog documents older women (and men) who dare to express themselves in fashion. Mr. Cohen began the blog in 2008 after moving to New York City, where he roams the streets looking to document the fashionable over-60 set — both male and female. As he states on his site, “Respect your elders and let these ladies and gents teach you a thing or two about living life to the fullest."

The international popularity of the blog has translated into a book, and even a coloring book. Now Mr. Cohen brings seven stylish ladies, aged 63 to 95, to the big screen in his affectionate and inspiring documentary, Advanced Style. Advanced Style had its U.S. premier at the Montclair Film Festival in New Jersey on May 3. Below is the long trailer of this fantastic film featuring some of the world’s most stylish seniors. Directed by Lina Plioplyte and produced by Ari Seth Cohen, I’m hoping the documentary finds wider distribution here in the U.S.

 As the American Baby Boomer generation ages, coming into one’s own style is just one aspect of aging well. Since we’re all living longer, it just makes sense to do it on your own terms. Or as Jean, of Valerie & Jean, the duo behind Idiosyncratic Fashionistas puts it, “I dress for myself. If someone doesn’t like what I’m wearing, I don’t give a sh*t.”

Mother's Day Gift Ideas for the Senior Mom

The day my daughter was born — my firstborn — I held her in my arms, looked into her eyes and fell deeply and unbelievable in love. Then I picked up the phone, called my mother, and apologized for every rotten thing I had ever done to her (especially during my teenage years.)

You certainly don’t need to be a mother to celebrate your mother. If you are lucky enough to have mom or a grandmother around to honor, we have a few suggestions that go beyond Chanel No. 5 (not that there’s anything wrong with that.)

Peace of Mind
If you mother lives alone (over 80% of American women outlive their male spouses), making sure she’s safe can be a great gift. Senior-proof the home to help prevent falls. Buy her a Medical Alert system. Technology is a beautiful thing and some systems come equipped with GPS tracking if your mother is a senior on the go.

Stay in Touch
The best cell phones for seniors have have large buttons that are easy to read and a high contrast LED screen. Look for amplified sound and, in some cases, urgent care monitoring, similar to the response she’d receive through an alert system. Two of the most popular cell phones especially made for seniors are Snapfon and Jitterbug with 5Star Urgent Response (which is running a Mother’s Day promotion for $20 off.)

I’ve recently set my mother up to Skype her family halfway around the world. At 83, she believes her flying days are over, but she is always delighted to speak with her brother in Poland face-to-face.

Preserve Memories
Remember when photos were printed on paper? Most seniors have boxes and albums full of memories, but they may be difficult to get to. Scan those photos and present them to her on a digital photo frame. She can watch her favorite memories play on a continuous loop.

A Little Help Here?
Many times we find our schedules so hectic, we forget that the elderly mom might need a little help with day-to-day activities. Perhaps she could use help with shopping, light housekeeping, or simple companionship. You can hire a fully vetted and bonded companion caregiver for just a few hour per week through a quality home care agency.

Time
Let’s face it — the best present you can give is your presence. Stuff is just stuff. If you can, spend a little time with your mother this holiday and show her what she means to you.

Cargiverlist® wishes all the mothers and grandmothers out there a happy Mothers Day. If you have some special gift suggestions, we’d love to hear about them in the comments.

Older Americans Month: Safe Today. Healthy Tomorrow.

Professional caregivers know that the primary responsibility they have to their senior client is to keep them safe and healthy. This entails keeping them mentally and physically (within capabilities) active, well-nourished, but perhaps most importantly, injury-free.

May is Older Americans Month and this year’s theme, Safe Today. Healthy Tomorrow, is focused on injury prevention. Older adults are at a much higher risk of unintentional injury and even death than the rest of the population.

Senior fall prevention can be the first line of defense in preventing unintentional injuries. According to the Center for Disease Control, one out of three older adults (those aged 65 or older) falls each year. Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries. In 2010, about 21,700 older adults died from unintentional fall injuries.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Administration for Community Living hope to raise awareness and help older Americans take control of their safety, thereby living longer and healthier lives.

Older Americans Month was established by President John F. Kennedy in May of 1963, after meeting with the National Council of Senior Citizens. At that time, there were 17 million Americans aged 65 and above. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter changed the designation to “Older Americans Month.“ In 2012, the census bureau counted 43.1 million people who were 65 and older in the United States. Older Americans Month is celebrated across the country through ceremonies, events, fairs, and other activities, in order to recognize the contributions of older persons in the community.

Here are some events that are taking place around the country:

Seattle/King County, Washington
A series of short films will be presented in a new festival dedicated to broadening the ways we think about aging.The Healthy Aging Partnership Film Short Festival takes place on Tuesday, May 6, with a reception and screening.

Albany, New York
Senior Citizens' Day 2014 will be held on Tuesday, May 6 at the Hart Theater in the Egg at the Empire State Plaza. The ceremony will honor older citizens from around New York State, with a focus on those who have lent their expertise to their communities through volunteerism.

Evanston, Illinois
The 16th Annual Aging Well Conference is a free half-day conference on May 9 providing strategies for healthy aging for older adults, their families, caregivers and professionals. The conference includes a continental breakfast and a choice of two workshops.

Nationwide
National Senior Health & Fitness Day is held nationwide on the last Wednesday in May during Older Americans Month. Over 1,000 locations across the nation will hold health and fitness events. 2014 marks the 21st year of the program.

For information on events, workshops, and in your area, contact your local Area Agency on Aging or call 1(800) 677-1116 to find ongoing opportunities to celebrate and support older Americans. You can also keep up with the latest events and news by following #OAM2014 on Twitter.

A great way to keep seniors safe is to make sure their caregivers are qualified. Caregiverlist recommends working with a quality home care agency in order to assure that the caregiver has received qualified caregiver training such as the training and certification offered by Caregiverlist Training University’s Basic Caregiver Training. Home care agencies also routinely perform background checks and drug testing prior to employment.

Springtime Senior Caregiving

Spring is finally in the air — mild temperatures and a little sun are a welcome respite from a long and brutal winter. Seniors and caregivers who have been cooped up for so many months can finally step outside for some much-needed fresh air and a little vitamin D. It’s the perfect time to have some fun outdoors (before turning your attention to caring for the elderly during summer.)

Outdoor activities for seniors can range from a simple walk in the neighborhood to some more interesting and challenging recreation. Fresh air and physical activity have been shown to have positive effects on both physical and mental well-being. Some seniors can play tennis or ride bikes; others may need slightly more sedate activities. As always, senior safety and welfare should be the guiding factor.

Here are some ideas for excursions for both seniors and their caregivers:

Gardening
Start with a visit to a garden center and confer with experts. Perhaps a full-blown vegetable garden is a little more daunting an undertaking than some seniors want to take on, but there are many fruits, vegetables and flowers that do very well in containers if space and activity level is limited. In addition to tending to growing plants, seniors (and their caregivers) can look forward to enjoying a nutritious bounty at harvestime!

Flea Markets and Craft Fairs
Flea markets and craft fairs are ideal places for seniors to buy gifts (for themselves or others) on a budget. It’s also a great way to connect with people — vendors love to talk about their goods. Go early to avoid crowds.

Walks in Nature
In Chicago, we’re lucky enough to have a beautiful preserved lakefront ideal for walking. But almost all towns have parks or nature centers. Even strictly urban walks can be restorative. Just remember to take care and apply sunscreen, wear a hat and bring water. And comfortable shoes are a must.

Hobbies and Games
Bird Watching, fishing, kite flying are all low stress outdoor activities that can be enjoyed by those of any age. Not sure where to start? Visit your local library and check out how-to guides. Many communities offer clubs for seniors to get together and enjoy outdoor activities.

Take the Indoors Outdoors
Almost anything you enjoy indoors can be taken outside. Reading a book on a bench in the park or on a patio in sunshine can be preferable to reading by lamplight in a stuffy room. Chess, backgammon, and card games work just as well on a picnic table as a kitchen table. And speaking of picnics, enjoy a meal al fresco. Chances are you won’t be alone, and the people-watching will provide seniors and caregivers much to talk about.

Getting outside and enjoying activities can foster closer connections between seniors and their caregivers. Remember to ask what your senior client or loved one might like to do, but make suggestions for activities outside the box. You’re never too old to try new things!

Photo by: Betty Roggenkamp

Senior caregivers are a vital to enabling the elderly age more enjoyably. If you are a certified companion caregiver, consider becoming the next career step in your caregiving career. Become a Certified Nursing Aide by taking a local C.N.A. course. Visit the Caregiverlist Career Center for more information.

Word Search + App Provides Themed Puzzles for Cognitive Exercise: Caregiverlist Senior Care App Review

Senior caregivers and their clients may find that they tire of playing the same games over and over again to keep up cognitive activity. The Word Search + app provides a fun way for seniors to exercise their brains while completing themed puzzles.

Intellectual activity stimulates the brain and keeps it functioning in top shape. Just like physical activity is required to keep the body in shape, mental exercise is required for seniors to maintain a fit brain as they age. The Word Search + app provides 16 free categories of word searches with options to play on Easy, Medium or Hard levels. Categories range from Dog Breeds to Classical Composers to Ancient Civilizations and range from puzzles with six words to 12 words depending on the level of difficulty.

Words can be displayed horizontally, vertically or diagonally within the block of text. When a user finds a word from the bank below in the puzzle, they simply select it in the puzzle by sliding their finger along the letters of the word in the puzzle to highlight it. A timer also keeps track of how quickly a user completes the quiz, in case they would like to attempt to beat their own time in the future. 

In addition to simply finding the words, caregivers and their senior clients could learn from the words in the given categories. If seniors choose a specific category for the puzzle such as Artists, as they complete the search they will look for names of famous painters which could remind them of a favorite work or peak their curiosity about an artist that they've never heard of before. After finishing the puzzle, caregivers can help their senior clients look up any topics or people generated by the quiz that they would like to learn more about. 

 

The Word Search + app is available for Apple platforms.

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discover additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

When Seniors Live at Home, It's Safety First

Seniors in America, by and large, prefer to age in place, at home. In fact, according to AARP, over 80 percent of seniors want to stay in their own homes as they age. However, many seniors need help with ADLs or activities of daily living, such as eating, dressing, bathing, toileting, shopping and medication management. Family caregivers many times find themselves stretched to a breaking point. Between work, caring for their own children, and other day-to-day demands on their time, caring for a senior may be a burden too great to bear.

Assisted living and nursing homes are options when family believes their loved-one can no longer live safely at home alone. But if 24-hour care isn’t needed, the autonomy, independence, and comfort-level of aging at home is preferential for most seniors. The biggest concern for seniors aging in place, at home, and many times alone, is safety.

A safe home is especially important in later years, as seniors begin to experience reduced eyesight, poorer balance, reduced flexibility, etc. AARP has identified the following primary living space concerns:

  • Safety features such as non-slip floor surfaces.
  • Bathroom aides such as grab bars.
  • A personal alert system that allows people to call for help in emergencies.
  • Entrance without steps.
  • Wider doorways.
  • Lever-handled doorknobs.
  • Higher electrical outlets.
  • Lower electrical switches.

In-home caregivers need to be chosen with safety in mind. Adrienne Sierra addresses the home care provider choice in her recent U-T San Diego Healthy Aging column, Feel Safe and Secure with In-Home Care. In it she discusses the precautions and safeguards that go into choosing a professional caregiver and keeping a safe home environment a priority.

Caregiverlist recommends working with a quality home care agency in order to assure that the caregiver has received qualified caregiver training such as the training and certification offered by Caregiverlist Training University’s Basic Caregiver Training. Home care agencies also routinely perform background checks and drug testing prior to employment.

Safety and security should be the number one priority for seniors and their families. With proper precautions, seniors should be able to remain in the comfort and familiarity of their own homes and lead independent lives longer.

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