Caregiver Recruitment Tools for Joining Largest Growing Industry

Senior caregivers will be one of the fastest growing industry sectors for employment in the coming decade.  Why?  Because America's seniors are living longer while needing care services for more of their senior years.  In addition, senior care services are moving to the home and with the new Affordable Care Act, there is a drive to reduce the need to be hospitalized over and over again for the same health issue.

While the new healthcare law has continued to be debated over and over again, one of the positive aspects of the law is what is called "accountability of care".  This portion of the law pretty much makes sense to everyone.  I mean, who wouldn't want to be not held accountable for their job.....which is probably another blog post.......but back to the topic which is being accountable. The new healthcare law says, "Hey Mr. Hospital, if you are going to discharge a patient from the hospital because you say they are well enough to go home, if they come back into the hospital in a few days or the next week, then maybe something is wrong with your patient care system, and, because of this, Medicare is no longer going to reimburse you at the higher hospital patient care rate."

This means hospitals must now be more accountable for their senior care, or, they won't be paid as much.  And the result is that the hospitals now actually care where you end up when you leave the hospital.  That is a good thing which also means more hospitals really want to be sure there are quality senior caregiving services in place when a senior goes home.

Caregiver recruitment now has become a priority by senior home care agencies to enable them to always have a quality caregiver to staff to the new senior clients they receive each day and week as the seniors are discharged from the hospital.

Professional senior caregivers must meet certain requirements such as:

  • Successfully Pass Criminal Background Check
  • Professional Caregiver Training Meeting State Requirements
  • Consistent to Work Track Record
  • Personal or Professional Senior Caregiving Experience
  • Interest in Fulfilling Employment Assisting Seniors

Online caregiver recruitment tools include producing a professional caregiver resume, obtaining a criminal background check and completing a basic caregiver training course for professional senior caregiving positions.  

Senior care employment includes working for the following senior care companies:

Assisted Living Communities

Senior Home Care Agencies

Home Health Agencies (Medicare/Medicaid Services)

Nursing Homes 

Part-time, full-time and "live-in" positions are available as some age-related illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease require around-the-clock care.  Live-in care does not mean that you actually move in and live with the client but instead is a term to refer to the position requiring full household management where the caregiver will spend the night with the senior and sleep at night.  Live-in caregivers go to the senior's home for a few days in a row and earn a full week's pay in just a few days.

Learn more about becoming a senior caregiver and apply to a professional senior care job in your area on Caregiverlist.  Senior care companies subscribe to Caregiverlist's recruitment platform to allow them to efficiently hire new caregivers each week in order to keep up with their staffing needs.

 

 

 

 

Veteran's Benefit for Senior Caregiving: Aid & Attendance

Senior veterans who have served in certain wars qualify for a senior care benefit in the home called:  Veteran's Aid and Attendance Benefit for senior care.  This is not a benefit that seniors are always aware of but the additional benefit is that veteran's spouses also qualify.  This benefit pays for senior caregiving services in the home, provided by licensed senior home care agencies with pre-approved Care Plans.  You may submit a request for senior home care in your area to obtain the licensed companies servicing veterans through the Aid & Attendance benefit.  Professionally trained caregivers are supervised in providing the care.

Here is the scoop for senior Vet's to qualify for Aid & Attendance benefit:

  • Served in World War II, World War I, Vietnam Era, Korean Conflict, Persian Gulf War, Mexican Border War, Spanish-American War, Indian War
  • Served at least 90 consectuive days in these wars and conflicts
  • Less than $80,000 in Assets

A senior must qualify to need caregiving services with a doctor's approval and the proper government paperwork must be filed.  You may download the Veteran's Aid & Attendance filing forms and learn more about both qualifications and benefits for Aid and Attendance benefits on Caregiverlist's research section.  

 

Senior Spoons May Soon Join Baby Spoons as Age-Related Gift

Seniors with age-related illnesses sometimes experience difficulty with eating, because of tremors which cause shaking in their hands and arms. Now, a new spoon offers a solution. Many times it is not the disease, but the medications taken to treat the disease, which result in a side-effect causing tremors in the body. This “shaking” results in the inability to control body movements.

Seniors and their caregivers must then cope with the additional side-effects, such as the inability to eat or walk without assistance.  Now, new technology has stepped in to assist seniors with this added challenge.

Lift Labs researchers have developed a spoon which counteracts the movements of a wavering grip, reducing the shaking by 70%.  A knife and fork will soon be added to this technology.

A new baby often receives a new baby spoon to celebrate their birth and now all of us may be receiving a senior spoon to assist us as we celebrate, or lament, entering into our senior years.

Aging comes with challenges, as we lose many of the freedoms we may have taken for granted when we were younger.  The ability to know you can eat a meal on your own is one such freedom. Perhaps as the senior population continues to grow, more technologies will transfer over to innovate solutions for healthy aging. Senior caregivers may learn more about these new spoons at Lift Labs.

Seniors needing additional care may also explore the costs of senior care and their care options in their area with a digital care plan.

Nursing Home Dental Care May Be Lacking Report Shows

Nursing homes care for senior residents who have a wide variety of care needs.  However, the level of staffing of Certified Nursing Aides to the number of senior residents they are caring for directly impacts the quality of care. You can review the C.N.A. to resident staffing levels in Caregiverlist's easy-to-use Nursing Home Star-Ratings directory.

Dental care for nursing home residents can impact their overall health.  This sort of makes sense, because everything needs more attention as we age and our new cells stop regenerating quickly to replace the old cells. And now we have a little research to back this up.

This means a new question to ask nursing homes when you are considering moving a senior into one for rehabilitation, should be:  "how often do you assist residents to brush their teeth?  And, "what do you do if they are resistance to dental care?"

A survey by the Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors says seven states have evaluated nursing home residents since 2011.  The findings show that there may be a growing epidemic in cavities, cracked teeth and gum disease in nursing home residents due to a lack of oral hygiene.

The association report gives the example of Kansas state, where nearly 30% of 540 older residents in 20 long-term-care facilities (that means nursing homes), had substantial oral debris on at least 2/3rds of their teeth and that regular oral care had become scarce.  

In Wisconsin, the report shows that about 31% of 1,100 nursing home residents from 24 different homes had teeth broken to the gums with visible roots, while about 35% had substantial oral debris.

Nursing home care includes dental care and the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987 requires brushing the teeth of nursing home residents who cannot do it themselves.  However, this is easier said than done.  As Certified Nursing Aides, or C.N.A.'s, know, if a senior is resistant to assistance, it can be very difficult to brush their teeth for them.  C.N.A.'s are required by law to be staffed at nursing homes to assist with the daily hands-on care.  

Seniors who have neglected their dental care for years prior to be admitted to a nursing home present an additional challenge.  Medicare does not pay for routine dental care.  Perhaps new technology can assist with finding a better way to assist C.N.A.'s to perform dental care in nursing homes.  The family members of seniors should be aware that they may have to step in to assist if the senior does not want to cooperate with the brushing of teeth and oral hygiene.

As assisting senior can be a challenging job, although always fulfilling, there is an ongoing demand for more Certified Nursing Aides - apply for a companion caregiving job in your area (Part-time and Full-time positions are available) and learn about becoming a C.N.A.

 

Dementia (Memory Loss) May Show Early Signs

Memory loss actually may be first noticed by the person with the condition - meaning the person who is losing their memory realizes they are forgetting things and that something has changed even before anyone else does.  But as this is a confusing process, most people find it difficult to identify exactly what is happening.  This is why it usually is not until memory loss has escalated that it truly is identified.  Many seniors have needed senior caregivers for ten or more years as their memory loss has progressed.

The Alzheimer's Association conference in Boston this week presented studies which show that some types of cognitive concerns were more likely to have Alzheimer's pathology in the brain although dementia would only fully develop later.  People with more concerns about memory and organizing ability were more likely to have amyloid, a key Alzheimer's-related protein, in their brains.

As millions of dollars are poured into Alzheimer's research, in order to prepare for caring for what will become 5 million seniors with the disease, it still is not known exactly how the amyloid protein escalates in some individuals and causes the "tangles" that seem to be present when Alzheimer's disease is present.

Dr. Rebecca Amariglio, a neuropsychologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, presented the research which shows there are people who have their own sense that their memory and thinking skills are slipping.  This is being called the "subjective cognitive decline".

Mayo Clinic's Alzheimer's center presented a similar preliminary study result.  However, the problem remains that even early testing for amyloid in the brain does not necessarily help as we still do not know exactly who will have this condition escalate into Alzheimer's disease and why.

Perhaps as technology advances, all the research along with the caregiving for seniors with memory loss can collide to help move us closer to identifying a cure for this disease.  The federal government's National Alzheimer's Project is a step in this direction.

 

 

Senior Caregiver Training

Senior caregivers assist seniors to remain independent in their own homes and sometimes also assist seniors living in assisted living communities and nursing homes.  This is because often nursing homes staff 1 Certified Nursing Aide to care for as many as 10 to 15 residents. Because of this, most seniors prefer to have one-to-one caregiving services in their own home while needing rehabilitation care or on-going senior care services.

Senior care services cannot always be administered quickly - senior caregiving, as experienced caregivers know, requires all the extra attention to detail you receive when enjoying a meal at a fine dining restaurant.  It cannot be done in fast-food style. Senior care also requires a wide variety of skills in order to understand how to cope with the aging process and promote dignity while providing caregiving services.

Caregiver training enables senior caregivers to provide quality care to seniors while maintaining a safe environment for themselves and for the senior.  By following consistent systems for the care routine, each caregiver can know what to expect and also quickly document when a care condition changes.

Certified Caregiver training verifies a caregiver has been taught the basic caregiver training skills.

Understanding how to take proper Care Plan notes, how to make objective observations and how to safely assist with bathing, meals, maintaining a clean and safe environment and making sure germs and infections are not spread.  Even tasks such as hand-washing, which is the #1 way to stop infections, must be done correctly.  

Caregivers can learn the basic senior caregiver training skills (which includes how to safely wash your hands - did you know properly drying your hands is very important, for instance?), and be confident they will deliver quality care with an online training course meeting industry standards.

Begin a career in senior care by purchasing an online certified training course and apply for a part-time or full-time caregiving job position to receive additional job training by a professional senior care company. Review the caregiver training requirements in your state as many states now do require basic training for professional senior caregivers and purchase the industry's approved certified caregiver training.

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