What are Caregiver Job Descriptions and Names: Understanding C.N.A., C.H.H.A., Personal Care Assistant, Certified Caregiver, Assisted Living Certified Caregiver

Senior caregivers assist seniors with what is referred to us "ADL's, meaning Activities of Daily Living. Learning how to help a senior with ADL's is the first caregiving skill in order to properly provide care. However, there are many additional skills needed depending on the senior's care needs and care environment. In order to properly be sure caregivers are trained to meet the senior's care needs, the federal and state governments have stepped in to regulate the industry.

Certified Nursing Aide (C.N.A.), also called Certified Nursing Assistant: this is a federal certification requirement for ALL nursing assistants working in nursing homes, assisted living communities, hospitals and hospice care. The C.N.A. process is governed by a federal law which requires each state to approve schools to give the C.N.A. training course and to manage the certification exam process. A minimum of 75 hours of training are required along with in-the-field clinical training. Individual states may require more training. The number of hours of training for nursing assistant certification can be from 75 hours to 180 hours, with just 13 states only requiring 75 hours of training. All L.P.N.'s and R.N.'s become trained as C.N.A.'s first as they progress through their education.  Find C.N.A. training programs in your state to become a C.N.A. and you may begin learning skills by applying as a professional caregiver where a senior care company will provide you with training.

Certified Home Health Aides (C.H.H.A.'s): this designation is used in the state of New Jersey to identify the specific job duties required for caregivers working in the home. As caregivers must supervise their duties each day and interact with other family members and are individually performing work in a home, it is important that these caregivers are trained in documenting care plan notes. New Jersey provides specific training requirements for professional caregivers working in the home and calls them C.H.H.A.'s.

RAISE Family Caregivers Act Passed by U.S. Senate -

The U.S. Senate passed the RAISE Family Caregivers Act this week (and this bill is actually supported by both Democrats and Republicans), which will require the development of a national strategy to support family caregivers. The bill goes to the House next for consideration. The Department of Health and Human Services would be required to develop, maintain and periodically update a National Family Caregiving Strategy. Federal departments would also be required to share any data that can assist with creating a national caregiving strategy.

Advocates are hoping this will help make senior care a national agenda item in the upcoming presidential election. Currently, only candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton, who cared for her own mother at home, has called for more support for family caregivers. 

This summer, New Mexico Representative Michelle Lujan Grisham reintroduced a bill to create a national Care Corps program, modeled after the Peace Corps, in which volunteers would help family caregivers. New York state's Representative Nita M. Lowey also introduced legislation that would give caregivers a Social Security earnings credit when they take unpaid time off from their jobs to provide care.

Advocates behind RAISE hope that increasing awareness will eventually spark political action.

Why?

Medicare does NOT pay for long-term care and nursing home costs can easily be from $150 to $350 per day. About 40 million Americans care for family members, which works out to an unpaid workforce worth around $470 billion per year. They typical caregivers is the oldest adult daughter or another relative. 

A congressional caucus was formed to focus on the needs of family caregivers earlier this year, with the backing of AARP. RAISE would specifically require the development, maintenance and updating of an integrated national strategy to recognize and support family caregivers. More caregivers and more programs to support caregivers will be needed to support our nation's growing senior population.

Senior caregivers are already in demand, as seniors rarely plan ahead for care and will be quickly discharged from a hospital to a nursing home or to their home while still needing assistance with activities of daily living. Anyone with a caring personality may become a senior caregiver by taking a basic caregiver training course and applying to a part-time or full-time caregiving job in their area.

AARP Offers this hotline to call your U.S. Congress Representative to urge them to support the bipartisan RAISE bill in the House at 844-453-9952 (Toll Free).  Remember, this legislation simply begins the process for a strategy to be developed around family caregiving.

Personal Care Aide Senior Home Care Training

Personal Care Aides are the name given to caregivers in some states, such as New Hampshire and Minnesota.  Personal Care Aides assist seniors with activities of daily living and are employed by senior care providers.

By learning the basic caregiving skills, personal care aides can deliver caregiving services more safely, while having the knowledge needed to complete each tasks.

PCA Skills include:

  • Care Plan Implementation and Notes
  • Communication Skills
  • Safe Transfers
  • Abuse and Neglect Identification and Reporting
  • Memory Loss (and Alzheimer's) Care
  • HIPAA (Privacy and Confidentiality Policies)
  • Infection Control
  • Personal Care

Review Personal Care Aide training and take an online PCA training course to become certified as a PCA and apply for a professional caregiving job in your area (senior care companies are constantly hiring).



How to Become a Senior Caregiver for Employment by Senior Care Companies

Caregiver employment opportunities are increasing, as America's population of seniors has escalated in recent years. Senior care companies are hiring companion caregivers, live-in caregivers and nursing aides. Anyone with a caring personality can become a senior caregiver. Learn how you can become a caregiver and apply on Caregiverlist to be considered for part-time and full-time caregiving jobs in your area (and refer your friends). Caregiving will be the most fulfilling work you will probably ever do, while also earning a paycheck.



Become a Senior Caregiver as a Professional Caregiver to Assist Seniors Aging-in-Place

Senior caregiver employment opportunities are plentiful and will only continue to increase as America's seniors are living longer while preferirng to age-in-place in their own homes. As adult children often do not live within a 1-hour drive of their parents and grandparents, and also are retiring later in life, professional senior caregivers are now providing the senior home care.

As senior care can be very complicated, sometimes specific training is required (for stroke care, memory loss care and for other age-related illnesses). Anyone with a caring personality can begin a caregiving career and obtain online caregiver training meeting the requirements for their state. Senior care industry executives anticipate more states will be passing legislation to require specific training as senior care moves to the home. Hospitals also are preparing to care for more of their patients in a home setting by enabling video technology and other tracking tools to stay on top of vital signs no matter where the patient resides.


Apply to a senior caregiving job near you today by submitting Caregiverlist's job application which will reach multiple employers in your area. Both part-time and full-time opportunities are available as some seniors require around-the-clock care. Live-in caregiver jobs also are available, where you stay with the senior for a few days at a time, enjoying meals together and sleeping at night and returning to your own home for the rest of the week. Hiring needs by senior care companies are constant as seniors rarely plan ahead for caregiving services and when a medical emergency, such as a fall or stroke, occur, the senior immediately needs care services. Senior care companies hire both companion caregivers where no formal training or experience is required (the senior care company will provide the training or you may take the basic training online) and Certified Nursing Aides who must complete a program meeting federal training guidelines and attend a local C.N.A. School.


Professional Association of Caregivers Provides Tools for Senior Caregivers

Caregivers working for senior care companies sometimes find themselves suddenly looking for a new job because their senior client has passed away or their condition has improved and they no longer need caregiving services. It can be frustrating to need to start over again to share your experiences and skills with a new senior care company.

The Professional Association of Caregivers understands these challenges and helps to support the senior caregiver by providing basic training and certification to show the caregiver has passed the course, along with membership recognition through a lapel pin and t-shirt and showing an agreement to follow the code of ethics.

Senior caregiver jobs are plentiful and will only continue to increase as the number of seniors increases by 10,000 daily. There were only 3.1 million seniors age 65 or older back in 1900. Today, more than 40.3 million Americans are age 65 or older. Our new social demographics show that as families are having children at an older age (age 30 and above) and both women and men are able to enjoy fulfilling careers, more than 50% of the time seniors do not live in the same town as their children.

Become a professional senior caregiver and apply to a caregiving job to be hired for part-time and full-time jobs in senior care. Caregiving brings fulfillment beyond a paycheck and as more senior caregivers are needed, you may want to refer any friends who are looking for fulfilling work to become a professional caregiver. P.A.C. membership includes online caregiver training to learn basic caregiver skills such as how to communicate effectively, safe transfers, taking care plan notes, activities for seniors with memory loss, infection control, environmental safety, HIPAA privacy guidelines, elder abuse reporting an dmore.


 

Alzheimer's Disease Strikes Chris Graham at Age 39

A rare form of Alzheimer's disease is passed on via a faulty gene, which strikes much before retirement years. Chris Graham's father died when he was just 42 years old and his aunt passed away at age 38. His brother now lives in a nursing home, at the age of 43. Now, Chris knows he is carrying the faulty gene too and will develop Alzheimer's disease.

Chris has decided to make the most of his life now, and has began a 16,000 mile bike ride across the U.S.A. and Canada to fund raise for dementia research. He started the bike ride in April, 2015, after discovering he had the faulty gene in 2010. He has lost four relatives from this disease, all passing away in their 40's.

One of four kids, he knew he had a 50-50 chance of inheriting the gene. He and his brother did inherit the gene while his two sisters did not. You read Chris Graham's blog posts on Alzheimer's Research UK.

As the number of seniors with memory loss continues to increase, as more seniors are living longer, having more professional senior caregivers has become a concern. Learn about how you can become a part-time or full-time caregiver or refer-a-friend to a caregiving job.


Giving a Loved One the Tools to Stay

Home With In-Home Care

Aging impacts an individual's life in unexpected ways. An aging parent or family member might not have the physical ability to continue cooking meals, paying bills or keeping a home clean, but that does not mean he or she feels ready to move from home. By using in home care in Scottsdale,

Arizona and working with professionals, a family can help a loved one stay home longer and still enjoy a healthy lifestyle.





Determining What Aging Loved Ones Need

A loved one's needs will depend on the situation and his or her health. In some cases, a loved one only needs assistance with basic cleaning and cooking due to the physical aspects of the tasks. In other cases, a loved one needs more comprehensive in home health care due to a physical or emotional ailment that impacts his or her health and wellbeing.

Find out if a loved one has a physical diagnosis of any health concerns. In home care works around a loved one's needs by providing services based on any medical conditions and health concerns. A professional helps with the basic necessities and makes recommendations for meals and nutrition that focuses on a loved one's current situation. 

Stay up-to-date with any changes so that a professional can address the situation. A loved one's needs will change as he or she ages and shows signs of potential challenges.




Providing Personal Assistance

Personal assistance from a family member or friend allows a loved one to feel comfortable while gaining the tools he or she needs to stay at home. A loved one's quality of life depends on his or her situation and environment while he or she ages. Personal assistance takes many forms, including simple companionship and enjoying meals as a family.

Give a loved one the assistance he or she needs after hiring professionals to handle the medical aspects of his or her lifestyle. For example, help a loved one keep bills paid by organizing the mail and paperwork on a desk. Remind a loved one about the bills and help with the cleaning to reduce to the risk of slip and fall accidents.


Make Use of Technological Advances

Technology changes constantly and some technology helps an aging loved one stay at home longer, particularly when compared with in home health care and professional services. Make use of devices that specifically assist a loved one with mobility, cleaning or even just monitoring his or her health and wellbeing. 

Advances in technology allow individuals to help a loved one connect with emergency personnel when problems arise, even if they cannot reach a phone or other tools. It also helps improve comfort in the home when a loved one might feel more aches, pains and general discomforts due to aging and old injuries. For example, putting in a tub or shower that has a low risk of slip and fall accidents will allow a loved one to stay home longer without taking unnecessary risks with his or her health.

Combine technology with in-home care in so that a loved one has companionship and appropriate tools to handle any emergencies or challenges. The technology provides peace of mind when an aging loved one stays home, even when he or she does not require significant health services due to a healthy and active lifestyle. The in home care allows a loved one to stay consistent and identify potential problems early while the technology handles unexpected emergencies or challenges.

Helping a loved one maintain a healthy body and mind requires the right tools and services. By working with in home care professionals, a family feels confident that an aging parent or loved one has the assistance and companionship he or she needs to stay at home and enjoy a high quality of life. The combination of appropriate tools, professional services and personal assistance gives a loved one the freedom and flexibility to stay home longer.



Brain Health Index Score Helps Seniors and Caregivers Manage their Minds

Brain health may soon be proved to be the most important component of healthy living and aging, as our brains connect to all the other functions in our bodies. The human operating system is turning out to be greatly impacted by our state of mind. Researchers now say our brains are the most important organ, creating memories, driving emotions and controlling every movement in our bodies. Now you can be proactive about managing your brain health with an online brain check-up tool.

One of our favorite authors, Deepak Chopra, and his pal Dr. Rudi Tanzi, also have a new book coming out called "Super Genes, Unlock the Astonishing Power of Your DNA for Optimum Health and Well-Being", as a follow-up to their book "Super Brain" and you can pre-order it. This book discusses how 95% of disease-related gene mutations are fully deterministic and influenced by diet, behavior and other environmental conditions.

Cleveland Clinic's Six Pillars of Brain Health can help us preserve our memory and lower our risk for brain disease. The recent suicide of actor Robin Williams, who was suffering from Lewy Body dementia, we now know, reminds us how vital it is to be able to properly diagnose our health issues. However, some types of dementia are difficult to diagnose in the early stages. Especially when there is an early onset of Alzheimer's disease, it can be mistaken for schizophrenia, drug abuse and all kinds of ailments that add even more stress to the situation.

Keep Memory Alive is a non-profit organization created to increase awareness and raise funds for the research, management and treatment of brain disorders (they are located in Las Vegas and receive sponsorship money from Caesar's - it's good to know there are gambling dollars going towards something positive). The Cleveland Clinic's Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health is supported by Keep Memory Alive and treats patients with:

  • Alzheimer's Disease
  • Huntington's Disease
  • Parkinson's Disease
  • Fronto-temporal Dementia 
  • Multiple Sclerosis
The Healthy Brains free brain check-up will help you manage your brain health and to be "mindful" of how to best care for your brain. When you take the Cleveland Clinic's free online brain check-up, you can also join their healthy brains research registry which also connects you to a community of people who are willing to participate in clinical research as we work to better understand how to treat illnesses impacting the brain.

6 Pillars for Brain Health
  1. Physical Exercise
  2. Mental Fitness
  3. Food & Nutrition
  4. Sleep & Relaxation
  5. Social Interaction
  6. Medical Health
Clinical trials are necessary to study better ways to treat memory loss. Right now, more than 70,000 volunteer participants are needed for more than 150,000 Alzheimer's Disease and dementia clinical trials. Participants are needed who are both healthy as well as those who already have a diagnosis of memory loss. Find clinical trial openings at Cleveland Clinic. Plan ahead for senior care needs or those of a loved one by learning about what Medicare and Medicaid cover and available care options near you.

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