Caregiver Registry California for Professional Home Care Aides

California's caregiver registry was created as part of the Assembly Bill 1217 (AB1217) Consumer Protection Act requiring senior home care agency's to be licensed by the state and all professional caregivers working in homes to meet minimum requirements.

Caregivers must complete a training course that includes 2 hours of Orientation training, 3 hours of Safety Training and 5 hours of Core Competency caregiving skills training for a total of 10 hours of training in their first year. Then each following year caregivers must complete 5 hours of renewal training on core competency skills. Here is the California caregiver training course information.

The California Department of Social Services manages the licensing process and the Caregiver Registry.

California caregivers must pass a background check clearance and requires a signed declaration under penalty of perjury regarding any prior criminal convictions and to confirm they are free of active tuberculosis.

California Home Care Aides are also required to have a valid driver's license or state issued I.D. or a valid Alien Registration Card. Fingerprinting is part of the background check program to confirm a caregiver is the person they say they are and prevent identity theft fraud.

The California State Department of Social Services manages the California Home Care Aide Registry.

Become a California Caregiver by taking an online caregiver training course and submit your job application to be considered by a senior care company near your California town.

Join the P.A.C. to receive caregiver training, t-shirt and lapel pin to meet state training requirements.

Updated Delaware Nursing Home Costs and Star Ratings

Delaware  nursing homes costs rank fifth in the nation, with an average room rate of $314 for a semi-private room, which is an annual cost of approximately $114,610.


According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Delaware’s estimated population as of July 2016 was 952,065, with 17.5% or 166,611 aged 65 and over. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that 84.9% of nursing home residents are aged 65 and over, and 41.6% are 85 and over. Most seniors are referred to nursing homes after a hospital stay, particularly for rehabilitation services. Some seniors may require a longer nursing home stay beyond the 100 paid days from Medicare. In these cases, nursing home care will need to be private pay or paid by long-term care insurance.


Planning for senior care in Delaware requires an understanding of nursing home costs and how those compare to other alternatives, such as assisted living and home care. Research results from AARP show that the vast majority of Delaware residents desire to receive their long-term care at home. Most people, however, do not understand the costs of long-term care and often find themselves having to gather information quickly because of an immediate medical need.


Gaining an understanding of long-term costs for seniors is chief among the concerns of Caregiverlist® readers. For that reason, we regularly update our nursing home cost database and have just released the latest cost and ratings for Delaware nursing homes.Delaware_Costs_Rating_Info.png


Caregiverlist® uses a proprietary rating system for nursing homes, taking into account the overall Medicare rating for the nursing home, the percent of short-stay residents with bedsores, the certified nursing aide (CNA) hours per resident per day, and the percent of residents whose need for help with daily activities has increased. The average Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Star Rating for Delaware nursing homes is 3.1 on a 5-point scale.


Total Number of Delaware Nursing Homes: 49

Average Single Room Price: $346

Average Double Room Price: $314

Average Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Star Rating: 3.1


Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Star Rating snapshot for Delaware:

5-Star: 5

4-Star: 23

3-Star: 16

2-Star: 1

1-Star: 4


The highest-rated Delaware nursing home for seniors is Manor House in Seaford, Del., with a rating of 4.6 stars (out of 5). There are 60 certified beds at Manor House, with the daily cost of a single room coming in at $325, which is 6.09% lower than the state average for a single room. The daily cost of a double room is $295, 6.31% lower than the state average.


For those seniors preferring to receive their care at home, especially if around-the-clock care is not a requirement, then in-home caregiving is an alternative. Says Darryl Hartz, director of operations for Senior Helpers, “We help keep ageing Americans safely in their own home, an environment that is comfortable and familiar. This can make all the difference, particularly when caring for someone with dementia. And we can provide this care at a fraction of the cost of a retirement community.”


Caregiverlist® offers a care plan to help seniors and their loved ones understand the costs of care and evaluate options. If you need to research nursing home costs and ratings in a state other than Delaware, please consult the Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Directory, the only resource providing this vital information.

Gait Belt Transfers for Safe Senior Care

How to safely transfer using a gait belt? Senior caregivers must be sure their senior clients are able to move from standing to sitting and bed to chair and back safely and the gait belt makes transfers safe for both the caregiver and the senior.

Caregiver Training University courses teach safe transfer skills. Watch this video to learn how to use a gait belt from Certified Nursing Aides and professional caregivers.


Become a Certified Caregiver by taking online caregiver training meeting your state's requirements and apply for a caregiver job near you.

Chicago Certified Nursing Assistant and Caregiver Appreciation Day June 16, 2017

C.N.A. Day of Celebration 2017

Caregivers and Certified Nursing Assistants provide the hands-on care to assist seniors to age-in-place and to live a healthy lifestyle.

Chicago Caregivers and C.N.A.'s and any individual interested in becoming a C.N.A. or Caregiver are invited to join us in celebrating the 40th Annual National Nursing Assistants Week. Genevieve Gipson, a Registered Nurse in Ohio, created the C.N.A. Network and advocated for professional certification for nursing assistants. Her efforts enabled national legislation for the training and certification of nursing assistants nationwide.

Free C.N.A. Day of Celebration

Friday, June 16, 2017

9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Morning Workshops from 9 a.m. to 12 noon will be repeated in afternoon from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.)

Midwestern Career College, located on Chicago River near Metra train and El trains

100 South Wacker Drive, Lower Level

RSVP to Attend 

More Caregivers and C.N.A.'s are needed as America's seniors continue to live longer lives while needing senior care to assist them with their Activities of Daily Living (ADL's).

Become a professional senior caregiver in Illinois by taking an online 8-hour course meeting the state's training requirements. Certified Nursing Aides are required to attend an approved C.N.A. school such as the Midwestern Career College and to then pass the state exam for official "certification" as a nursing aide. This is the first step in the career ladder for working in the healthcare field which is predicted to be a top employer in the coming decade.

You may begin your caregiving career by applying for a job on Caregiverlist and you will then be considered for employment as a companion caregiver or C.N.A. by licensed senior home care agencies.

Join us on June 16th for Workshops on how to pay for C.N.A. school (you can qualify for funding of your tuition), attend mini-training courses by C.N.A. instructors and meet employers. View the agenda for the C.N.A. Appreciation Day - and you also receive a goody bag and free food and snacks!


Long-term care insurance caregiver training

Long-term care insurance policies require caregivers to be trained to meet the policy requirements. The caregiver training requirements will vary based on the policy but usually require a caregiver to have professional training meeting their state requirements or to be a Certified Nursing Assistant (C.N.A.) by passing the state C.N.A. training course and state exam.

Learn about caregiver training requirements in your state to purchase training meeting your LTCI policy.

How to Become a Caregiver for Senior Care with State Approved Caregiver Training

Senior caregiver training requirements vary by state, based on state law requirements for licensed senior home care agencies and private duty senior care (caregivers hired and paid privately - this is still an old-school term used in the industry: "private duty").

Why do states regulate senior care? Because most senior care fraud starts in the home by a loved one or caregiver. Senior care can take an emotional toll on the caregiver and sometimes this can lead even good caregivers to take a wrong turn to justify financial, emotional or physical elder abuse.

In addition, many of our modern employment laws, such as payroll taxes which an employer takes out of each check for the employee and also contributes additional money for each payroll, provide for Social Security benefits, Worker's Compensation benefits and insurance protections and healthcare benefits.

States are passing legislation to protect both the caregiver and the senior. 

Caregiverlist provides a training portal to allow senior care companies to easily train all of their caregivers and track the training renewals while giving the caregivers a competency exam to test retention of the training skills.

Family caregivers and hire-direct caregivers can also take online caregiver training to learn basic caregiving skills to make sure they are maintaining safety and staying current with elder-abuse laws, privacy laws and the latest Alzhiemer's disease care and approved medications and other age-related disease care. Caregivers may view training required in their state and join the Professional Association of Caregivers to receive a t-shirt and lapel pin along with their online training course.




Receive Online Caregiver Training + T-shirt and Lapel Pin

Illinois Nursing Home Workers Fighting for $15 an hour Wage

Nursing home daily rates are usually above $100 per day and can be higher than $400 per day, as the Caregiverlist Nursing Home Costs directory shows. Many Illinois nursing homes charge more than $300 per day for a private room and the median cost for a single room is $208 per day. Studies show that nursing home workers are among the most underpaid working women and men in the country with 1 in 3 nursing assistants relying on public assistance for some of their family's living needs.

Chicago Illinois nursing home workers participated in rallies on Thursday, April 14, 2017, to showcase their need for a higher hourly pay rate, seeking $15 per hour. Politicians, including two high-profile Democratic candidates for governor, Chris Kennedy and J.B. Pritzker, joined the rallies.

Image result for photos of illinois nursing home workers fighting for $15 minimum wage

The Paraprofessional Health Institute reports in their research that nursing assistants and workers providing laundry, food and housekeeping services are underpaid, often viewed "as a cost to be managed rather than an asset to invest." Keeping the wage floor low leads to 50% of nursing home workers leaving their positions each year and adds to the dramatically growing gap in available trained long-term care providers.

Nursing homes employ Certified Nursing Assistants (C.N.A.'s) who must meet minimum training requirements and pass a state certification exam to care for residents.

  • 91% of Nursing Assistants are Women
  • 1 in 3 C.N.A.'s rely on taxpayer-funded public benefits such as food stamps, energy assistance or Medicaid
  • Insufficient staffing levels contribute to high injury rates and high turnover
  • The average turnover for nursing assistants exceeded 50% in 2012
  • More than 1.3 million older Americans and people with disabilities currently reside in nursing homes
  • 10,000 Americans turn age 65 daily and the number of older Americans age 85+ will triple by 2050
How difficult would it be for a nursing home to pay more? Medicaid, the government program for low-income seniors, reimburses nursing homes for their fees for seniors on Medicaid. Medicare, for all seniors age 65 and over, pays for up-to-100 days in a nursing home. Others must private pay for the rooms. Review the cost of nursing homes near you. 

C.N.A.'s continue to be in demand and can always find local hospitals, nursing homes, and senior care companies hiring. Learn more about caregiver and C.N.A. jobs and training near you and submit a job application to be considered for openings. Caregivers may provide one-on-one care in the home for a senior and gain skills with an online caregiver training course. C.N.A.'s working in nursing homes may care for as many as 12 or more residents.


Become Professional Senior Caregiver with State Caregiver Training

Professional senior caregivers now may take formal training curated to meet state licensing requirements for senior care. As Americans are living longer, while needing care for some of those years and end-of-life care, both professional and family caregivers may join the Professional Association of Caregivers to keep up with industry news and research. The online caregiver training delivers skills for safety for both the senior and caregiver. Learn how to communicate with seniors, understand age-related illnesses, medications, infection control, environmental safety, transfer skills from bed to wheelchair to walker and more.


Join the P.A.C. Professional Association of Caregivers to receive t-shirt, lapel pin and online caregiver training certification.
JOIN NOW Created by Senior Home Care Industry Professionals for the Industry - Built for Caregivers

Modern Caregiver Training for Senior Caregivers

Caring for seniors includes understanding age-related illnesses and the techniques proving successful in providing for care in each situation. Senior care companies can easily train all of their caregivers by enrolling them in just 2-clicks and caregivers keep their log-in to easily revisit the training and obtain renewal training for annual state certification requirements.

Caregivers may now enjoy digital caregiver training showcasing real-life skills to incorporate into their senior caregiving services, such as this scene from the movie Still Alice where the nursing home uses baby-dolls to keep the seniors with Alzheimer's disease comforted and engaged. Purchase individual Caregiver Training or Contact Caregiverlist for COMPANY CAREGIVER EMPLOYEE TRAINING in Bundles of training passes that do not expire and are smart-phone and tablet-friendly.

Online caregiver training by Caregiver Training University incorporates modern tools to provide skills you can implement to provide quality senior care for age-related illnesses, such as baby-doll therapy showcased in the movie Still Alice. Caregivers stay engaged in training incorporating audio + photos + videos.

Senior care companies may call 312-669-8821 for a demo of the digital caregiver training sold in cost-effective bundles which do not expire and are current with digital technology. Or email: susan@caregiverlist.com

Staying Alive vs. Living Life

My 100-year-old Grandma Martha may be nearing the end of her life. While she has lived a long life we are reminded that she is from a generation that really does not talk about death. Her generation had a life expectancy of age 75. 

Dr. Jessica Nutik Zitter wrote an article for The New York Times this month titled "First, Sex Ed. Then Death Ed". She shares the statistic that 80% of Americans would prefer to die at home, but only 20% actually do. She notes that often people in intensive care units may be restrained and have no idea they are dying. You can read more of Dr. Zitter's articles on her website.

Grandma has a pacemaker which has extended her life. But she also has macular degeneration which has caused her to lose most of her vision. Losing your eyesight dramatically impacts your quality of life. Which lead her to tell her doctor to only give her a "2-year battery" for her pacemaker last year. How do we better plan for death?

How do we decide to say "no" to medical procedures which may extend our life but not improve a diminished quality of life caused by a health condition which cannot be cured? 

My father, at age 79, is also living life right now by volunteering in Ecuador. He just shared his whitewater rafting photos.


That's Dad in the back seat of the raft, hanging with the 20-year-old's.

My Dad is still living life, for sure. He has mentioned more than a few times that the adventure travel company assigned him a 26-year old lady from Argentina to accompany him to be sure he could manage. See, not everything about aging is negative! There are no right answers to some questions. We have to find the best possible answer for ourselves. The spirit of life pulls us forward. My Grandma still has the fight in her and we can see that and are assisting her to keep on going in all ways possible. 

She is still living life. With a whole lot of help from family members and doctors and nurses and nursing aides and caregivers and friends. She still has a very sharp mind and memory. But she also is living with pain each day, which we cannot take away.

Starting the conversation about how we would like to experience aging and what we would not want done to extend our life if the quality of life will not be there should become a part of our care plan for senior care. Medical technology has allowed us to do what could not be done before for physical care and we need to become modern enough to discuss the emotional components of aging and caregiving as well.

Senior care companies and senior caregivers can begin the conversation about death with adult children by sharing stories of scenarios of aging that are positive and negative. By talking about death we can spark new ideas and solutions to learn how to age in a way that truly allows someone to not only be alive but to be living life.

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