Tasty App Provides Caregivers With Visual Recipes

If you have a Facebook account, it's likely that you have seen videos on your feed from an account called Tasty showing how to make many different types of recipes. For senior caregivers, cooking at home or for senior clients may seem complicated and time-consuming. The new Tasty app offers caregivers the ability to view recipe videos and easily view how to make each part of the recipe as they go along.

When users first open the app, it asks them if they'd like to log in using their Facebook account. Then, once caregivers connect the app, it asks them if they'd like to see only vegetarian recipes or if they'd like to see all of the recipes. Users also need to select if they'd like the app to send them notifications or not.

Once users are logged in, they're taken to the home screen which shows different kinds of recipes broken into different categories. The recipe categories include summer produce, dips, Japanese-inspired and comfort food.



Once users decide on a recipe they like and click on it, the app takes them to the detailed recipe page. This includes the full Tasty video of how to make the recipe, as well as a written list of ingredients and a step-by-step version of the video.

In step-by-step mode, the app shows the instructions one at a time and the accompanying portion of the video. This will be especially useful for caregivers who don't have a lot of cooking experience, as each step is described both written and in video form. Once caregivers complete a step, they can swipe left to continue on to the next instruction. 

Caregivers can like recipes to store them in the My Recipes area of the app. This section will also display all of your recently viewed recipes, in case you need to go back to something you forgot to "like." Users can also export the ingredient list for their next trip to the grocery store. The one downside to the recipes is that they don't list nutrition information, so caregivers will need to make their own judgements on if a recipe is healthy or fits into a senior client's diet.

If caregivers have a particular dish in mind that they'd like to make, they can also search within the app itself. Users can enter a keyword or pick from the suggested ones. Some are based on Difficulty such as "5 Ingredients or Less," or "Under 30 Minutes" while others focus on occasion, such as "Casual Party," "BBQ" or "Weeknight."

The Tasty app is available for Apple platforms.

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discover additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

- Paige Krzysko

Grilling App Helps Caregivers Prep for Holiday Weekend

With the Fourth of July holiday on Tuesday, many caregivers and their senior clients may be planning to celebrate by attending a party or grilling at home with loved ones. While old stand-bys work, the Weber Grill app offers a wide selection of recipes to try this year.

The recipes are the main star of the Weber Grill app. When caregivers first open it, they are greeted with a home screen full of photos of featured recipes, such as California Hamburgers with Guacamole Mayonnaise or Caribbean Swordfish with Mango Salsa. As caregivers scroll down, new recipes continue to populate the screen.

Caregivers can also scroll through categories of recipes by selecting the different icons at the top of the screen. Categories include new recipes, red meat, pork, poultry, seafood, veggies, dessert, etc.

When users see a recipe that they'd like to make, they can click on the photo to see all of the details. At the top, caregivers can see the number of servings it makes, the prep time and the grilling time. As they scroll down, they can also see the ingredients and the cooking instructions for the dish. 


If caregivers want to make a recipe, they can add it to their Grocery List within the app and it will prepopulate with all of the ingredients that they need. Then, when caregivers are at the grocery store, they can easily scroll through the list of ingredients and place a check mark next to the items as they place them in their grocery cart.

The app also includes a built-in timer, so when you place your food on the grill you can easily cook it for exactly the time specified in the recipe. And even more helpful is the Grill Guide area. Here caregivers can pick the type of meat they're cooking, it's approximate thickness and the desired cook, if it's something like beef. Once the info is entered, the app will tell you approximately how long to cook it for to get the desired cook.

The Weber Grill app is available for Apple platforms.

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discover additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

- Paige Krzysko

Healthy Recipes in App in Time for the Holiday Season

It's the most wonderful time of the year, and the one with the most calorie-heavy dishes. With Thanksgiving next week and the following month full of once-a-year treats, abandoning healthy eating for indulgence can be tempting. However, caregivers can use the Kitchen Stories app to find new recipes to make at home or for senior clients to eat in moderation, despite the time of year. 

When caregivers download the Kitchen Stories app and open it to their main feed, they will see a rotating set of featured items as well as several recipes below. When caregivers click on "Filter" in the upper right-hand corner, they can adjust the recipes they see on the home feed by category, difficulty, diet or preparation time. The diet preferences include: vegetarian, vegan, sugar-free, lactose-free, gluten-free or alcohol-free.

Under the Search tool, the app features a variety of recipes sorted into several categories, such as 20 minute dishes, low carb, weeknight dinners, vegetarian and under 400 kcal. While not every category represents a "healthy" recipe, caregivers can sort through the options and find a recipe to meet certain dietary needs. However, for other dietary needs such as low-sodium or low-fat, caregivers might need to make their own adjustments and substitutions to the recipes. 


Once caregivers pick a recipe, they can click on it and see how to make that recipe two different ways. At the top of each recipe page, the app provides a video showing each step of making the recipe, from raw ingredients to cooking methods to the finished product. Underneath that, caregivers will see the traditional recipe format, showing the text list of ingredients and step-by-step instructions for how to cook the item. 

Also included on the recipe page is the basic nutritional information for the dish: calories, protein, fat and carbohydrates. A rating system on the recipe also shows what other users thought of the dish after having made it on a scale of one to five stars. The one-star rating says, "I didn't enjoy this," and the five-star rating says, "Absolutely delicious!"

The How To section of the app features short videos showing different cooking techniques for those who are still learning. The topics range from "How to prepare beets" to "How to knead dough (and why)." On average they range from one to three minutes long, so caregivers can watch them and emulate the techniques in their own kitchen. 

Once users find recipes they like, they can add them to their saved recipes for reference. They can also add ingredients to the shopping tab so they know what they need to buy when they go to the store. 

The KitchenStories app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discover additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko 

Learn to Cook for Caregivers With Video Recipe App

Looking at a recipe on a piece of paper and following the instructions to the best of your ability only to have the end result turn out nothing like it's supposed to can be frustrating. Sometimes learning to cook requires more than step by step printed instructions. Caregivers can learn how to cook new recipes by watching videos for each step using the Yummly app. 

When users first download the Yummly app, they are asked to enter some personal information such as age and who you most often cook for. Caregivers then pick their favorite types of cuisines. Options include Asian, Cajun & Creole, Greek, Mexican, etc. There's also a category for Kid-Friendly, in case there's a child you often cook for. 

The next section asks for information on specific allergies, such as dairy, gluten or soy, or diets, such as vegetarian, paleo or vegan. The next section breaks down foods the user dislikes, with options such as alcohol, bacon, beef, mayonnaise, etc. If you often cook for a senior client, it might be beneficial to complete this section with them so the recipes are tailored to their preferences. 

Users then rank their cooking skills as beginner, intermediate or advanced. Then caregivers are presented with an array of recipes that they can scroll between, either clicking Yum or skipping. This part gives the app an idea of actual recipes you might enjoy to further personalize your recommendations. In addition to personalized recommendations, users can also browse popular recipes in their area if they so wish. 



When caregivers scroll through the homepage and find a recipe they're interested in, they can click on it to see a snapshot including the number of ingredients, calories per serving and how long it takes to make. After that, they can scroll up to see the recipe itself and, if applicable, the accompanying video.

Not every recipe in the app has an accompanying video, but it's easy to distinguish which ones on the homepage have them because a play button appears over the image. The videos provide a good step by step overview of the recipes, as well as advice on how to properly apply cooking techniques and avoid pitfalls not fully described by printed recipes. 

Caregivers can rate the recipes from the app after cooking them to share their experience and how the recipe turned out. The Shopping List area of the app also provides a place for users to record what they need to buy, and it even integrates with Instacart to provide delivery of ingredients within an hour. 

The Yummly app is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Cook New Meals Using New York Times Recipe App

Whether you're looking to surprise a loved on Valentine's Day, to share something special with a senior client or to spoil yourself, try cooking a homemade meal. The New York Times Cooking app offers a variety of tasty sounding recipes ranging from basic recipes for daily cooking to fancier recipes for a special occasion. 

The homepage of the app features the Latest Recipes category by default. An array of new recipes such as Wild Rice and Quinoa Stuffing or Vegetarian Skillet Chili show up here for users to browse. Recipes like the Vegetarian Skillet Chili are comprised of  ingredients typically found in a pantry, such as canned tomatoes and beans plus garlic and onion. 


The length of time needed to make the recipe and the number of servings appears at the top for a quick decision about how much work it will take. A recipe like this one would be perfect for caregivers to make on a day off and eat throughout the rest of the week for dinner, or to share with a senior client who's trying to eat healthy. Users can also see how many stars the recipe has from fellow app users who have previously made the dish. Unfortunately, the app does lack a comments area to read about any tips or difficulties other users experienced when making the recipe. 

Back on the homepage, other topics for sorting recipes include Vegetarian, Times Classics, One Pot, For Two and Gluten-Free. For other dietary restrictions, caregivers can type in the search for terms like Low-Sodium, Low Cholesterol, Low Sugar, Kosher or Vegan. This feature serves particularly useful for caregivers whose senior clients have dietary restrictions set by their doctors. Narrowing down the recipes by diet restrictions still gives caregivers plenty of options. A search for Low-Sodium recipes offers 514 recipes to choose from. 

The major other area of the app features lessons on How to Cook. For example, the first screen that appears after selecting the category says, "Learn to Cook Salmon." Ideal for caregivers who are new to the kitchen, this area of the app serves as a step by step guide for not only the act of cooking salmon, but also selecting the correct cut and giving it the right preparation to be successful. 

This section of the app provides detailed instructions and videos on all of the various ways to cook salmon. Caregivers can learn to sauté, poach, sear, roast, broil or cook en papillote with their fish. Underneath the details for some of the techniques, the app brings up recipes which use that method for caregivers to choose from. This area of the app also features some videos and photos to augment the learning process. 

An additional feature of the app gives caregivers the ability to save recipes for later use if they create an account. The NYT Cooking App is available for Apple platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discovers additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Chicken Paratha Rolls: Leave Your Leftovers Cold-Turkey

The days following Thanksgiving are notorious for leftover kitchen concoctions -- turkey sandwiches, turkey soup, mashed potato pie -- but sooner or later you'll be left with a hole in your appetite and no stuffing to fill it. While personal feast withdrawals are hard enough to handle, Caregivers have the added responsibility of keeping seniors healthy and happy. Fortunately a great way to color a client's palate and help fend off withdrawals is to whip up these Chicken Paratha Rolls.

Ingredients:

• 1/2 kilogram Boneless Chicken 1-inch cubes 

• 2 tablespoon Raw Papaya Paste 

• 1 tablespoon Ginger paste 

• 1 tablespoon Garlic paste

• 1/2 teaspoon Green Chili paste

• 1/2 teaspoon Red Chili powder 

• 1/4 teaspoon Garam Masala powder 

• Salt to taste

• 1/4 cup Butter melted 

• Onion rings as required

• Green chutney as required

• 2 cups of flour

• 2 tbsp oil

• Water as required

Directions:

1. Mix together the papaya, ginger, garlic and green chili pastes with chili powder, garam masala powder, and salt. Apply this on the cubes of the chicken. Set aside in the refrigerator for three hours to marinate. 

2. Pressure-cook the marinated chicken cubes with one cup of water till the pressure is released.

3. Remove the lid when the pressure reduces and check if there is any liquid remaining. If yes, then cook till all the water evaporates. Remove from the pressure cooker and set aside.

4. Heat a grill and grill the chicken cubes till completely cooked. Baste with melted butter from time to time so that mutton does not dry out.

5. Combine all the dry ingredients for the dough. Add water, oil and form smooth dough. Add more water or oil if required. Cover the dough and keep aside. The dough should be pliable and soft, not hard.

6. Roll the paratha into a disc of 3-4 inch diameter. Make sure to put flour on the area you’re rolling, so it doesn’t stick. 

7. Fry the paratha on griddle with oil. Don’t fry the paratha on low heat otherwise they will become hard. The griddle should also be hot enough before you put paratha for frying.

8. Lastly, take the paratha and spread a thin layer of green chutney, sprinkle some onions and add the mutton on top. Roll the paratha roll evenly on both sides. Take a bite and enjoy!

 

Apple Sauce for a Crisp Fall Day

Keeping a healthy snack around can sometimes be a challenge, especially when dealing with the extra stress of caregiving.  And since an apple a day keeps many bad things away, apparently, why not spice your apples up with just a couple of simple ingredients to create healthy apple sauce.

Caregivers can also use cooking as a way to engage with their senior client.  As we are in the middle of apple season here in the Midwest, talking about memories that surround apples and autumn could lead to some interesting stories.  Did someone in your senior's family bake the best apple pie ever?  Do they still have the recipe?  Or did they instead make an apple crumble or cobbler?

One of my former senior clients told a story about her family farm in Virginia where all the heirs of the 8 children who grew up on the farm still get together every October to do a weekend of apple butter making.  They collect apples from the orchard on their farm and build a huge bonfire and cook the apples down all night long.  Family members sign up for shifts to stir the apples.  Then they go home with jars of apple butter made on their family farm.

Healthy and Easy Apple Sauce 

3 Ingredients:  Apples, Cinnamon or Apple Pie Spice, Apple Juice

The amount of each of the ingredients varies based on how many apples you use and how much spice you like.  Use the below amounts as a starting point and then add more juice if you need a bit more moisture and more spice as needed to please your palate. No sugar needed!

4 Apples

1/4 cup Apple Juice

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Peel and core apples and slice.  Add to sauce pan on stove top.  Pour in 1/4 cup of apple juice and a teaspoon of cinnamon.  Cook on medium to medium low, stirring and mashing the apples with a wooden spoon until completely cooked down to sauce.

Chicken Tortilla Soup: Caregiverlist Recipe of the Week

A chilly fall afternoon calls for a nice warm cup of soup. Some store bought canned soup can be surprisingly high in both sodium and fat content, but homemade soup allows senior caregivers the ability to control all of the ingredients. Our Chicken Tortilla Soup comes together in a medley of several types of vegetables, low sodium chicken broth and black beans for a delicious but surprisingly nutritious dinner. 

Ingredients
1 fresh tomato
1 fresh green pepper
1 fresh red pepper
1 small white onion
1 tablespoons olive oil
10 cups low sodium chicken broth
1 can black beans, drained and rinsed
3 limes
1 single use packet taco seasoning
1 lb boneless skinless chicken breast
1 avocado
Low fat shredded Mexican cheese mix
Low fat sour cream
Tortilla chips or strips, optional

Directions
Chop the tomato, red pepper, green pepper and onion into small pieces. Spread one tablespoon of olive oil over the bottom of your pot and add the vegetable medley. Sauté until the vegetables are cooked. Add chicken broth and taco seasoning mix to the pot and stir. Bring the broth to a boil then drop uncooked chicken breasts into the pot, cover and simmer. Allow the chicken breasts half an hour to cook then pull them carefully out of the soup. Place the cooked chicken breasts on a plate and shred using two forks pulling in opposite directions. Add shredded chicken breast back to the pot then squeeze the lime juice into the soup. Stir then serve. Garnish with low fat sour cream, low fat Mexican cheese mix and chopped avocado to taste. Eat with tortilla chips or add tortilla strips to the soup if desired.  

Caregivers and their senior clients can customize the recipe based on their personal tastes. Almost any favorite taco topping can be incorporated. Add brown rice if you'd like more fiber full carbohydrates, substitute kidney beans instead of black beans or add garlic and jalapenos for a stronger flavor. The result is a dish with a much lower sodium count than canned soup with fresher ingredients and low fat dairy products keeping the overall unsaturated fat content low. 

Heart Healthy Tacos: Caregiverlist Recipe of the Week

Tacos make a fairly easy go-to dinner for any group because they're totally customizable. Try our version of the classic taco with some substitutions for heart health. Share them with a senior client, a friend or just enjoy them yourself.  

Using lean ground turkey instead of ground beef, greek yogurt instead of sour cream and low fat cheese significantly decreases the amount of saturated fat in the dish. Adding avocado brings in some monounsaturated fat, which helps lower cholesterol. Avocados also have a high nutrient count and contain fiber to keep you feeling full for longer. 

For caregivers or senior clients who may be allergic to gluten, corn tortillas make a great substitute to still be able to enjoy this dish. Likewise, for those who are simply trying to eat healthier, using a whole wheat tortilla will get more fiber which can help lower blood sugar and cholesterol for heart health. 

Ingredients
1 pound lean ground turkey
1 packet taco seasoning
1 head romaine lettuce
1 tomato
1 avocado
1 8oz container plain greek yogurt
1 package low fat shredded mexican cheese mix
1 package tortillas of choice (flour, wheat, corn)

Directions
Brown ground turkey in pan until completely cooked. Drain excess fat then return to pan and season with taco seasoning packet. Chop the lettuce, tomato and avocado as desired. Assemble ingredients on tortilla and enjoy. 

Other ingredients to try in your tacos include green or red bell peppers, brown rice or black beans for extra protein. If you'd like to serve with a side, try a small salad with low fat dressing or a side of beans and brown rice. 

Teriyaki Bowl Makes for Surprisingly Quick Dinner

Senior caregivers spend long hours at work and once they come home, the idea of cooking dinner from scratch can seem like a daunting and time consuming task. Many home cooks don't realize how easy making their own sauces from scratch can be nor how little time it takes. Myfamilydish.com shares with us their homemade teriyaki sauce recipe, which they say can be made in less time than it takes to pick up an order from your local Chinese restaurant. 

Teriyaki sauce from Myfamilydish.com

 

The basic ingredients for the teriyaki sauce include garlic, ginger, soy sauce, water, Mirin and vinegar. Health benefits of creating your own sauce include being able to control the specific ingredients that make up the final product. If you or a senior client have a dietary restriction limiting your daily sodium intake, then that need can be accommodated with a homemade sauce recipe by using low sodium ingredients or a salt substitute. In this particular recipe, take note of the amount of sodium in the soy sauce you plan to use before purchasing. 

Once the safe is made, combine your favorite Asian noodle with vegetables of your choice. Try broccoli, snap peas, eggplant or cabbage and add some cooked shrimp or chicken in for additional protein. Top with your teriyaki sauce and serve. The recipe overall shouldn't take more than twenty minutes for a healthy customizable dinner.

 

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