Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo takes us back to England, and St. Ives in Cornwall, at the start of a beautiful day. Feel free to share this photo with your loved ones. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools. Have a great week, and enjoy the holiday with your friends and family.

"My body needs laughter as much as it needs tears.  Both are cleansers of stress."                    -Mahogany SilverRain

Seniors See Health Benefit from Soccer

Oh FIFA, what have you done to me? USA vs. Belgium, Netherlands vs. Mexico—it seems I just can’t get enough of 2014 World Cup Brazil. Watching those men run up and down the soccer pitch had me wondering, is this just a young person’s sport?

Apparently not.

A recent Danish study shows that its never too late to start playing what the rest of the world calls football. Researchers from the Copenhagen Centre for Team Sport and Health at the University of Copenhagen recruited 27 inactive men, ages 63 to 70, and had them take part in either football training, strength training, or no training at all. After four months of twice-weekly one-hour workouts, tests showed quite a difference between groups regarding aerobic fitness and muscle strength.

For those who practiced and played soccer, maximum oxygen uptake increased by 15 percent, muscle function was improved by 30 percent and bone mineralization in the Femoral neck (of the thigh bone) increased by 2 percent.

senior soccer

Image courtesy of tungphoto / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

“Our study shows that intense training such as football can change the lives of elderly men,” said study leader Professor Peter Krustrup, in a press release.

And 70 is the new 30 if you’ve been playing soccer all your life. Krustrup added, “Our previous studies have shown that 70-year-old men with lifelong participation in football possess a postural balance and rapid muscle force that is comparable to that of 30-year-old untrained men.”

The benefits of soccer enhance life off the field as well. Playing soccer has been shown to reduce high blood pressure in the elderly and also reduces the risk of falls and bone fractures.

Caregiverlist® has always believed that senior fitness is a major component of healthy aging. Caregivers can learn about fitness and nutrition in order to help seniors live their best possible lives. Caregiverlist Basic Training, powered by Caregiver Training University, provides easy-to-access online caregiver training for professional and family caregivers.

MapMyRun App Suggests Run Routes, Tracks Progress: Caregiverlist Senior Care App Review

Exercise, particularly cardio, provides stress relief and fitness for senior caregivers to maintain health. The MapMyRun app makes it easy for anyone to start running and track their progress over time by offering suggested routes using GPS and tracking distance run, time and calories burned. 

Running provides a great exercise option because it allows the user to set the pace of the activity, so caregivers can start out their training regime by alternating between walking and running and then build up to more vigorous and continual running as their endurance improves. Caregivers can select a suggested running route from those built into the app with set mile lengths such as roughly 2.5 or 5 miles, or they can simply start running and the GPS function on their phone will pick up on the route as they run. 

The Live Tracking option that can be enabled allows users and their friends within the app to see the progress of the run as it takes place. Once a run is complete, the app provides stats including overall distance, duration and pace. Users also have the ability to enter a run into the system after it has occurred if they were unable to use their phone to log it as they ran. 

Listening to music during a workout can help motivate the runner, so the app also allows users to select a playlist to play while they run without having to switch back and forth from MapMyRun to the music app on their phone. Once users begin to log runs on a regular basis, they can look at their log of runs and see how their health and endurance have improved. The paid version of the app also includes extra features, such as a coaching function to help encourage runners and assist them in getting the most out of their workout.

MapMyRun is available for Apple and Android platforms. 

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discover additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia: What's the Difference?

It happens almost imperceptibly — a misplaced wallet, a forgotten word or name, short-term memory loss. These incidents can be normal blips in memory, but sometimes they can be indications of a more serious cognitive degeneration. The fear of being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease can keep a person in the state of denial. In fact, new figures show half of those who are diagnosed with dementia waited at least six months before seeing their doctor.

The Alzheimer’s Association says that of more than 6000 people surveyed, nearly a quarter of list Alzheimer’s disease as the second most frightening condition they most fear getting, behind cancer. More than 80% believe that the disease is a normal part of aging, and nearly 40% of people believed that only those with a family history of the disease could be affected.

But Alzheimer’s disease is not a normal part of aging. It's a disease that causes brain cells to malfunction and ultimately die. Neurons are the chief type of cell destroyed by Alzheimer's disease. That causes memory changes, erratic behaviors and loss of body functions. It’s a sad fact that Alzheimer’s has no survivors. The disease is the 6th leading cause of death in the United States.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. The Alzheimer’s Association is asking everyone affected by the disease to show their commitment to the cause by wearing purple and posting to social media sites like Facebook. As they say on their website, “Everyone who has a brain is at risk to develop Alzheimer's—but everyone can help to fight it.”

A number of celebrities have banded together to support Alzheimer’s awareness. Recently, actor and Alzheimer’s activist Seth Rogan spoke to congress about the need to allocate more funding to research and eradicate the disease that strikes so many, including his mother-in-law.

BradleyCooper

Bradley Cooper proudly promotes purple to #ENDALZ.

All Alzheimer’s disease is dementia but not all dementia is Alzheimer’s. Dementia is an overall term that describes a wide range of symptoms. Although Alzheimer’s is the most common form of dementia, there are a variety of other dementia types. These include Vascular dementia, or post-stroke dementia, which accounts for about 10% of all dementia cases. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) sufferers are more likely than people with Alzheimer's to have early symptoms such as visual hallucinations and muscle rigidity. Parkinson's disease, frontotemporal dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus are also types of dementia. Some of these diseases are treatable. Unfortunately, no cure or treatment slows or stops some of these progressive dementia diseases, like Alzheimer’s. But there are drug treatments that may temporarily improve symptoms.

Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) is often, but not always, a precursor to dementia. If you’ve been diagnosed with MCI, or are caring for a senior with Mild Cognitive Impairment, there’s a lot you can do to ease the ease and reduce the signs of MCI. For example, it’s been found that, coupled with a healthy diet, regular exercise can have a very positive impact on the brain and cognitive function.

Caregiverlist® urges if you are a senior caregiver whose family member or client presents any symptoms of memory loss, to seek the counsel of a doctor. Early detection is key in order to benefit from treatment and to plan for the future. Some dementia disorders are treatable — such as depression, drug interactions, thyroid problems, excess use of alcohol or certain metabolic disorders, such as a vitamin B12 deficiency .

If you or your beloved senior has Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, share your story with the world. Reach out to us on Twitter @Caregiverlist and don't forget to use #gopurple and #endalz to join the conversation. It’s time we destigmafy Alzheimer’s and other memory loss diseases.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. Summer is finally here! This week's photo features a day on the beach on the southern coast of England.  Feel free to share this photo with your loved ones. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools. Have a great week. 

"Tension is who you think you should be.  Relaxation is who you are."  -Chinese Proverb

Long Term Care Scorecard: Best and Worst States

When I was a kid, Florida and Arizona were the retirement states of choice. My parents and their friends decided that, after decades of Midwestern winters, the promise of warmth and sunshine, coupled with the notion of never picking up a snow shovel again proved too enticing to pass up. At their first opportunity, many of the “snowbirds” declared permanent residency in those sunshine states. Did they make the wrong move?

This week, AARP in conjunction with the Commonwealth Fund and the SCAN Foundation, released the 2014 State Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) Scorecard. In it, they rate states based on long-term services and support for the elderly, people with physical disabilities, and family caregivers. State performance was measured across five categories:

  • affordability and access,
  • choice of setting and provider,
  • quality of life and quality of care,
  • support for family caregivers, and
  • effective transitions

The report shows that in terms of quality of long-term care, Florida ranks in the bottom quartile compared to other states, although it fares better than Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi, and Tennessee in affordability and transitions from nursing home care back to the community. This interactive map shows each state’s ranking:

The top-ranking states for long-term care and services are Minnesota, Washington, Oregon, Colorado, and Alaska; perhaps it’s not quite time to put those snow shovels on eBay.

It’s a well-known fact that few of us prepare for long-term care, although about 70% of people age 65 and up will need some sort of assistance with the activities of daily living. While most people would prefer to age at home, Medicare doesn’t cover the cost of home care provided by a Home Care Agency. Few of those in their 40s, 50s and 60s carry long-term care insurance and Medicaid is available only for low-income seniors with few assets. And before we all decide to retire to Minnesota or Washington, it’s important to note that long-term care is unaffordable for most middle-income seniors in all states.

The authors of the study see the need for a guide at the federal level to establish minimum long-term care performance standards below which no state should fall. No one anywhere in the U.S. should fear that their state cannot provide the needed level of assistance. Susan Reinhard, one of the study’s authors and senior vice president of Public Policy at AARP told Forbes magazine that she is optimistic in the incremental improvements she’s seen since a similar study was published in 2011, but admits all states can do better.

Caregiverlist® champions the need for change in the long-term care arena and urges you to contact your state legislature or your state’s Department on Aging and let them know how important it is to improve services in providing high-quality, well-coordinated, affordable long-term care.

MayoClinic App Eases Communication Between Patients, Doctors: Caregiverlist Senior Care App Review

Assisting seniors as a caregiver brings many challenges, including the challenge of communicating with both the senior, their family members and their medical doctors. Now, senior caregivers and their senior clients can make communicating with their doctors easy by using the MayoClinic app. Users of the app can search locations, schedule appointments, see their medical records and view publications. 

Making a doctor's appointment for a senior client can potentially result in a game of phone tag between the patient and the medical office. With the Mayo Clinic app, senior caregivers can help their senior clients make appointments within the app. Further communication with the doctor's office within the app includes recommended health actions by their physician. 

Another useful area of the app once an appointment is made allows users to plan for their visit to the clinic by reading about specific information on the clinic and hospital buildings, maps and parking. Lodging and restaurant information also makes it easy for patients who may be traveling to their appointments to find accommodations. A video guide also shows users various aspects of the clinics, from arriving at the local airports to tours of the downtown area and entering the clinic. 

The My Health section of the app allows users access to their medical records and health information on demand, as well as to see recommendations for health actions from their doctor. This function comes in handy when senior clients may be visiting a different doctor for an regular exam, such as the dentist, and they ask for any changes in medical history. Caregivers can help senior clients pull up the medical history on the app to compare with the data on file at that office.

Patients can also message their doctors through the app if they have a minor health question, such as a clarification on the instructions for taking a medication. In the Our Locations sections you can also search all Mayo Clinic locations in case of a need to see a physician while away from home. The flip through organization of the categories of the app with subcategory descriptions below allows for easy navigation. 

The Mayo Clinic app is available for free for Apple and Android platforms.

Senior caregivers, let us know your feedback on this app and keep us posted if you discover additional apps that assist with caregiving duties and help relieve caregiver stress. You may also refer-a-friend to a senior caregiving job and win prizes weekly and monthly on Caregiverlist. 

-Paige Krzysko

Seniors Need Protection from Nursing Home Abuse

It’s a story I hate to write or even read, but sticking my head in the sand will not make the problem go away. And because June 15 was World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD), I thought it would make sense to talk about the issue today.

Elder abuse takes many forms; physical, emotional, sexual and financial abuse unfortunately affects hundreds of thousands of seniors each year. Nursing home residents are especially vulnerable.

Back in February 2014, a Bronx New York nursing home employee was charged with raping an elderly resident who is unable to communicate. Manhattanville Health Care Center LLC had a Medicare overall rating of 5 stars, whereas, because of its number of reported bedsores and its low C.N.A.-staff-to-resident ratio, the facility’s Caregiverlist’s® Nursing Home Star Rating was a mere 3 stars.

Recently, a Florida nursing home CNA's father received a 7-year sentence in an identity theft case, where he used stolen identification information to file fake tax returns and get refunds, according to an article in McKinght Long Term Care News. Palm Garden in Polk County, Florida, also received only a 3-star Caregiverlist® Nursing Home Rating.

An evaluation published in the Journal of Elder Abuse and neglect details a seven state Criminal History Screening (CHS) program for long-term care workers. The report states that popular support for enhanced criminal history screening (CHS) procedures for long-term care workers in the United States is evident; case studies and news stories regarding abuse, theft, or neglect of long-term care residents are abundant yet repugnant to a society that aims to protect those that are physically and/or mentally frail.

Results of the evaluation found that, of the 204,339 completed screenings, 3.7% were disqualified due to criminal history, and 18.8% were withdrawn prior to completion for reasons that may include relevant criminal history.

The federally-funded pilot program points to a vital need to conduct thorough background checks for any potential senior caregivers, whether they be in an institutional or home setting.

The Administration on Aging has provided these tell-tale signs that a senior may be suffering elder abuse or neglect:

  • Bruises, pressure marks, broken bones, abrasions, and burns may be an indication of physical abuse, neglect, or mistreatment.
  • Unexplained withdrawal from normal activities, a sudden change in alertness, and unusual depression may be indicators of emotional abuse.
  • Bruises around the breasts or genital area can occur from sexual abuse.
  • Sudden changes in financial situations may be the result of exploitation.
  • Bedsores, unattended medical needs, poor hygiene, and unusual weight loss are indicators of possible neglect.
  • Behavior such as belittling, threats, and other uses of power and control by spouses are indicators of verbal or emotional abuse.
  • Strained or tense relationships, frequent arguments between the caregiver and elderly person are also signs.

Most importantly, be alert. The suffering is often in silence. If you notice changes in a senior’s personality or behavior, you should start to question what is going on.

President Barack Obama, in his 2012 presidential proclamation decreed June 15 as World Abuse Awareness Day stating, “Every American deserves the chance to live out the full measure of their days in health and security. Yet, every year, millions of older Americans are denied that most basic opportunity due to abuse, neglect, or exploitation. On World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, we call attention to this global public health issue, and we rededicate ourselves to providing our elders the care and protection they deserve.”

If you are a caregiver, consider taking Caregiverlist’s® Caregiver Training Course. With it, you can learn the types of abuse and neglect, legal requirements for reporting (and legal punishments for not reporting) and how to protect your senior client and yourself from physical, emotional, sexual and financial abuse.

Caregiver Stress Relief Photo of the Week

Caregivers employed with senior care companies know the realities of caregiver stress. Caregiverlist invites all family caregivers and professional caregivers to take a moment for relaxation with our photo of the week and inspirational quote. This week's photo takes us Alicante, Spain, and recalls a relaxing afternoon by the sea. Feel free to share this photo with your loved ones. Thank you caregivers and certified nursing aides for caring for our seniors and please refer your friends to apply for part-time and full-time job positions on Caregiverlist.com and visit our career center for additional career tools. Have a great week. 

"Releasing the pressure, it's good for the teapot and the water.  Try it sometime."    -Jeb Dickerson

Senior Driving Safety

School’s out and that means a whole slew of new teen drivers will be on the road. While the thought of a 16-year-old behind the wheel makes me nervous, senior drivers who have not recently evaluated their driving skills can also make me run for cover.

June is National Safety Month and the National Safety Council has designated this year’s theme as "Safety: It takes all of us," and was inspired by the idea of continuous risk reduction. The Council’s emphasis this year is on putting an end to distracted driving but I think its a great time to revisit the challenges facing the mature driver.

It’s been written that “Adult children would rather talk to parents about funeral plans than about taking away the car keys.” It’s a difficult conversation—many seniors associate driving with independence (that they don’t want to relinquish.) For the adult children of driving seniors, revoking that driving privilege can mean picking up the slack and becoming chauffeur to mom or dad, at least until Google’s self-driving car becomes available.

So how do you know if it’s time to take away the keys, or are there steps to ensure the senior can hang on to those keys just a little longer?

Caregiverlist® provides our own Safe Driving Checklist. We’ve provided some basic red-flags that might mean it’s time to reexamine a senior's on-road capabilities. These include:

  • Vision: Is the senior able to pass a vision test? (Cataracts, Glaucoma and Macular Degeneration can all impact vision quality).
  • Are there any unexplained dents in the paint of the car or on the garage?
  • Does the senior allow others to ride in the car with them when they are driving?
  • Does the senior seem nervous or extra anxious when driving? Does the senior take alternate routes to avoid major highways?
  • Does the senior fail to stop at red lights or stop signs?
  • Are speed limits obeyed (Not driving too slow or too fast)?
  • Have neighbors or others who see the senior driving (anyone who also attends a regular event they may drive to) observed anything unsafe? 

Also, talk to their physician to see if any of their medications can affect their driving ability.

If the above are not at issue and your senior is feels relatively safe to drive, the Massachusetts Registry of Motor vehicles suggests some self-imposed limitations which may include driving only during daylight hours, staying home when weather conditions are poor, avoiding rush hour, and driving less.

AAA, the leader in driver safety, offers many online tools to evaluate and improve senior driving skills. They also suggest taking driver improvement courses. These can teach older drivers how to adjust for slower reflexes, weaker vision and other changes. Taking and passing a comprehensive driving improvement course can result in potential discounts on insurance premiums.

It’s important that seniors realize the risks associated with accidents. Statistics say drivers age 85 and older are injured or killed in crashes at a higher rate than any other age group. This is due primarily to increased fragility that comes with age. Older senior drivers are generally less able to withstand the forces of a crash, so they are more likely to become injured.

Effective September 30, 2010, drivers 75 years of age or older can only renew a driver's license at an DMV branch or AAA office. The operator must either pass a vision test or present a completed Vision Screening Certificate. If you need to contact your local DMV, check out Caregiverlist’s® Department of Motor Vehicles by State list.

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